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The Tailor and the Sweater - Page 2

post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by kfitzpatrick
Sure, absolutely, and I've tried it. And I think it looks pretty bad. To be certain, it may work for you and other men, but on me a turned back sweater cuff comes off looking ill-fitting.

I've recently come to the conclusion that just because I'm not proportionate to the normal small, medium, and larges of the world doesn't mean my casual clothes shouldn't fit correctly. I'm just your normal 5'6-5'7 guy, bit of a gut but otherwise muscular, long torso, short limbs. And, I can't find a darn thing that actually fits me.

If I could spend twice as much on an article of clothing that actually fit all around I probably would, so an alteration fee doesn't seem all that bad.

BTW, kitonbrioni, I regularly check out your blog and love seeing what other fashion-interested guys are wearing.

Thanks
-Kevin
Funny, when I was a kid my dad taught me that sweater sleeves were supposed to be turned back. Maybe that's a particularly trad affectation?
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad
Funny, when I was a kid my dad taught me that sweater sleeves were supposed to be turned back. Maybe that's a particularly trad affectation?
Some are made with a really long ribbed portion with the seam on the "outside" at only the last 2-3" of the edge, which indicates that it is meant to be turned back. Lots of the older style raglan sleeve v-necks and shetland sweaters are this way. I like it because I can wear them long - even though the seam is showing, I don't care.
post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 
Interesting, I guess it's just a personal choice on the whole sleeve turning back thing.
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