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RANCOURT & Co. Shoes - Made in Maine - Page 240

post #3586 of 4975
Update: Yes, they can do hooks now. No, they cannot to eight eyelets, only seven. They were on break, and the boots will be done in a few weeks.
post #3587 of 4975
Do the beefroll penny loafers run true to size, or do you normally size down a half size?
post #3588 of 4975

Odd request:

 

I'm looking at picking up a pair of beefroll penny loafers, and I'm torn between Rancourt and Oak Street.  I've been planning on getting the OSB variety, purely because I love my OSB Trail Oxfords, but as someone living in Maine, I'd love to own a pair of the Rancourts.  I went into Portland Dry Goods today to try the Rancourts on, and they had a beautiful makeup with dark olive CXL (almost imperceivably green, but truly stunning) and lactae hevea crepe soles (with a heel) that I immediately fell in love with.  Unfortunately, when I tried them on, the beefrolls and moc stitching seemed awfully narrow to me...and while I know they shouldn't be big/clunky shoes, I think I want the stitching/beefrolls to be a tad bit wider.  The fit itself would be fine (once stretching occurs), but that stretching would likely have minimal effect on the width of the beefrolls and moc stretching, so I fear they won't suit my aesthetic.

 

So, I'm hoping somebody out there might have a pair of beefrolls by both companies that would be willing to measure the width between the beefrolls to tell me how different the two designs are, if at all.

 

Thanks in advance.

post #3589 of 4975

I just received my Caramel Cordovan Beefroll Penny Loafers from Rancourt. I must say I'm pretty pleased with the way they turned out. Hopefully I'll get a few minutes this weekend to take and post some pictures.


Edited by dddrees - 1/9/14 at 6:09pm
post #3590 of 4975
Congrats! I can't wait to see them
post #3591 of 4975
Quote:
Originally Posted by rydenfan View Post

Congrats! I can't wait to see them

 

Thank you sir.

post #3592 of 4975
Quote:
Originally Posted by RecoveringChef View Post

Do the beefroll penny loafers run true to size, or do you normally size down a half size?

I hate to say this, but it depends.

 

My CXL beefrolls were a little snug at first, but have stretched to the point where I need to either wear thick socks or add insoles. If you get shell cordovan they won't stretch like that. If you plan to go sockless or wear very thin socks, you should probably size down.

 

The length of the shoe is perfect though, so even if I sized down I'm not sure if they'd fit.

post #3593 of 4975
Quote:
Originally Posted by RecoveringChef View Post

Do the beefroll penny loafers run true to size, or do you normally size down a half size?

I have shell venetian loafers and shell pennies and would say TTS for those, because they'll never stretch much.
post #3594 of 4975
Quote:
Originally Posted by PartagasIV View Post


I have shell venetian loafers and shell pennies and would say TTS for those, because they'll never stretch much.


I went TTS for each foot (different sizes) on my custom Beefroll Shells just because I figured the same thing.

post #3595 of 4975
The issue of Rancourt's insole materials seems to come up a lot in various online forums, and I wanted to chip in on that discussion with a perhaps different perspective. As many of you are probably aware, Rancourt's insoles are texon, a compressed cotton fiber board used in sneakers, hiking boots, and work boots. They wrap it in leather and add some padding. The insoles are replaced during each recrafting, since the insoles have to be stitched through to resole the shoes. The two complaints I hear leveled against using texon are longevity, which the recrafting process makes moot, and durability. It's on this last point that I feel like materials snobs really go off the deep end with fantasies about what they're going to do to their shoes.

As I mentioned, Texon insoles are used, in non-replacable form, in backpacking boots and work boots. Chippewa uses them for damn near everything, Red Wing uses them in many models, (and Poron in many more), and on and on. Now, I've worn boots made with either, and I do prefer leather. Leather conforms to the foot differently. But these guys are buying LOAFERS, not work boots. And they don't bat an eye at cork filled leather insoles on shoes like Aldens, despite cork not being even remotely durable, and also needing replacing. Within two years, my feet compacted through the cork of my perfect fitting Aldens so badly that they needed inserts. (I was walking in them a bit too much.) With the Rancourts, you get the feel of leather on your foot, a cheaper price, and no sacrifice in the longevity of the shoe.

Is leather better? Hell yeah. And I'd love to see them offer it, just as a luxury option. But if you get your shoes resoled, you know what they're gonna do with those nice leather insoles? Throw them in the trash, because they replace them. I'm really glad that they go all out with their stitching (waxed horse hair), leather, cordovan, and soles, and yet keep the cost pretty accessible to people by omitting a luxury unnecessary to the shoe's actually lasting longer.
post #3596 of 4975
Interesting. Thanks. It seems to me as if you are someone who can speak to durability of materials and construction from experience.
post #3597 of 4975
I mostly just feel like...Okay, you know the kind of guy who carries a $200 tactical pen for self defense, but can't walk a flight of stairs without being winded? People do that with shoes a lot. If you are jumping out of planes to fight fires, yes, you need White's boots with Kevlar stitching and yadda yadda. If you fancy going for strolls? WITH PUDDLES, even? Ranger moccs will probably cover it.
post #3598 of 4975
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattBernier View Post

The issue of Rancourt's insole materials seems to come up a lot in various online forums, and I wanted to chip in on that discussion with a perhaps different perspective. As many of you are probably aware, Rancourt's insoles are texon, a compressed cotton fiber board used in sneakers, hiking boots, and work boots. They wrap it in leather and add some padding. The insoles are replaced during each recrafting, since the insoles have to be stitched through to resole the shoes. The two complaints I hear leveled against using texon are longevity, which the recrafting process makes moot, and durability. It's on this last point that I feel like materials snobs really go off the deep end with fantasies about what they're going to do to their shoes.

As I mentioned, Texon insoles are used, in non-replacable form, in backpacking boots and work boots. Chippewa uses them for damn near everything, Red Wing uses them in many models, (and Poron in many more), and on and on. Now, I've worn boots made with either, and I do prefer leather. Leather conforms to the foot differently. But these guys are buying LOAFERS, not work boots. And they don't bat an eye at cork filled leather insoles on shoes like Aldens, despite cork not being even remotely durable, and also needing replacing. Within two years, my feet compacted through the cork of my perfect fitting Aldens so badly that they needed inserts. (I was walking in them a bit too much.) With the Rancourts, you get the feel of leather on your foot, a cheaper price, and no sacrifice in the longevity of the shoe.

Is leather better? Hell yeah. And I'd love to see them offer it, just as a luxury option. But if you get your shoes resoled, you know what they're gonna do with those nice leather insoles? Throw them in the trash, because they replace them. I'm really glad that they go all out with their stitching (waxed horse hair), leather, cordovan, and soles, and yet keep the cost pretty accessible to people by omitting a luxury unnecessary to the shoe's actually lasting longer.

Good perspective there, I agree.

Besides, most of us rotate shoes and wear them for style.
post #3599 of 4975
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattBernier View Post

I mostly just feel like...Okay, you know the kind of guy who carries a $200 tactical pen for self defense, but can't walk a flight of stairs without being winded? People do that with shoes a lot. If you are jumping out of planes to fight fires, yes, you need White's boots with Kevlar stitching and yadda yadda. If you fancy going for strolls? WITH PUDDLES, even? Ranger moccs will probably cover it.

tactical pen? What's that? Wait. I don't want to know... 😄

Agree here too. Once you get to a certain level of construction and quality I think you've met or exceeded the average wearer's daily needs. Of course we all like to be able to talk about what we could do with our gear. Mostly though we don't do those things.
post #3600 of 4975
My shoes need, on a daily basis, to handle the possibilities of mud, snow, wet grass, puddles, concrete, and still be okay in a business casual environment. Any of the CXL moc-toe shoe makers cover this perfectly (though Rancourt has long been my go-to). For non moc-toe shoe seasons, I wear CXL or shell cordovan shoes, really been focusing on my natty CXL Alden Indy's this winter. I stopped wearing calfskin shoes as my daily wear, because the dew on the grass would soak through within seconds.

Of course, obviously my situation is a bit more idiosyncratic than others'. I'm also fortunate that I can get away with wearing these sorts of shoes to work on a daily basis, usually with twill or corduroy pants (can't wear jeans, and chinos get ruined by the dogs).
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