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What did you wear to go see Snakes On A Plane?? - Page 2

post #16 of 43
LO(MF)L. I was just IMing a friend about that, j. It's even more fun to acronymize famous Samuel L. Jackson speeches.

SWA!SWA,IDY.IDDYMF.SWOMGDT.
post #17 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saucemaster
LO(MF)L. I was just IMing a friend about that, j. It's even more fun to acronymize famous Samuel L. Jackson speeches.

SWA!SWA,IDY.IDDYMF.SWOMGDT.
Hahahaha!
YTDTD! AIHTBIH!
post #18 of 43
M... TIATB!

(shout filter killer)
post #19 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnrswitch
Not to be a movie snob, but I am going to be a movie snob. I am boycotting this movie, because I would rather see a real B-movie... like shark attack 1-4, sasquatch, megalodon, etc, etc. Big money to make a movie crappy? Sounds like a waste of money to me.

Big money? You have to be kidding. How much was Titanic again? Alexander? The Hulk? Crappy movies get made all the time with high budgets, The average movie costs 65 million to make, and 35 million to market.

SoaP cost less than $40 million to make and market, which is NOTHING for a hollywood movie.

They ended up spending less than 10% of their marketing budget for this movie, due to word of mouth advertizing, fan blogging, and home-made t-shirts/hats/ and merch.

If you don't want to go see it, thats fine, but not seeing it because it isn't a "real" B movie is a lie. this is the biggest B movie of all time, a movie that made it onto screens and will make money BECAUSE of the fans. We WILLED this movie to be made, and now that its here, it belongs to us.

New Line, by the way, is also a great distributor of B movies straight to video and has a very solid catalog of horror, scifi, fantasy, comedy, and etc. that fans of B movies will enjoy.

Even though Lions Gate is currently my fav. dist. house, New Line has been solid and great since the early 90's.
post #20 of 43
Wow, didn't mean to offend. Sorry I insulted the movie of the masses. And yes crappy movies do get made all the time, but titanic, alexander, the hulk, etc. all were made with the intention of being good movies. This movie was made with the intention of being a "B"style movie. It shows you how inflated movie budgets are when 40 million is considered slim pickens. Hell I would rather watch tokyo drift than this movie. I actually did watch tokyo drift and was rolling on the theatre floor LM'MF'AO (for all the sam jackson fans). Hell there was plenty of space on the floor cuz no one was in the theatre.
post #21 of 43
I saw and enjoyed both Snakes on a Plane and Tokyo Drift...



m
post #22 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnrswitch
Wow, didn't mean to offend. Sorry I insulted the movie of the masses. And yes crappy movies do get made all the time, but titanic, alexander, the hulk, etc. all were made with the intention of being good movies. This movie was made with the intention of being a "B"style movie. It shows you how inflated movie budgets are when 40 million is considered slim pickens. Hell I would rather watch tokyo drift than this movie. I actually did watch tokyo drift and was rolling on the theatre floor LM'MF'AO (for all the sam jackson fans). Hell there was plenty of space on the floor cuz no one was in the theatre.
I'm not really offended, I just think that your reason for not going to see it sucks. Especially if you went to go see Tokyo Drift. SoaP is in my opinion, a better movie. I think here that there is a disparity of opinion about what a "b" movie is. Just so everyone knows... historically, a B-movie was a short or a secondary filler movie that played along with the "A feature" or "A movie". Roger Corman, who is often termed "King of the B movies" would be the first to point out that he did NOT in fact make B movies, since the custom of the double feature had died out before he started making them, he made low budget "exploitation films". Regardless, the exploitation genre was catagorized in with the sci-fi and horror genre's to create the base of the modern definition of a "B-movie". In the 1970's there was a resurgance in the production of exploitation, sci-fi, and horror movies, thanks to New Line Cinema, Canon, Golan Globus, Film Ventures, and Independant International Films. Almost ALL these films were lower budget than your typical studio fare, and many were not released widely. At the advent of cable television and video, many of them skipped the theater circuit entirely and went straight to cable, VHS, or Betamax. the B-movie directors in the 1980's, John Carpenter, Sam Raimi, Roger Corman, and etc. frequently spent millions of dollars on their films. Escape from NY's budget is anywhere from $5.5 million to over $7 million, and this is 1976/77 money. That wasn't even a lot for a movie BACK THEN! That was slightly below average. There are a handful of movies out there that were made for less than a million dollars in the modern age, Evil Dead, El Mariachi, and The Blair Witch Project are the three that come to mind, but its not a realistic goal and hasn't been since the early 70's. The cost of film stock and processing, or recently DV media, effects, and processing has made the sub $1 million dollar movie pretty unreasonable. Basically in Seattle we are talking about: One exterior location, one interior, five shooting days, less than a handful of principal non union actors, minimal crew, minimal sound effects, home made visual effects, no post pro or camera effects, three takes or less for every scene, handheld DV cameras or homemade dollys, self editing, self color correction and sound, and REALLY knowing what you are doing in an editing suite and are capable of keeping your onsite editing down to about 8-10 hours. Then maybe you have a 90 minute movie that will probably suck, and about enough money to promote it in a local newspaper. Thats gonna run your budget up about $100,000+ depending on where you shoot and what sort of permits you have to get. Film will cost more, take longer to edit, and ultimately will probably look worse than DV at that price point. So basically, unless you come up with a concept film, like Blair Witch, that utilizes crappy work as part of the atmosphere, your movie is probably going to sit on a distributors shelf until the building is condemned. Quality wise, probably in between what your home movies look like, and the cheesy re-inactments on America's Most Wanted. The 70's and early 80's saw sci-fi and horror take off in popularity, causing the line between b-movie and big budget A movie to blur. This is why the modern definition of "B" is so important. "B movies" are effectively sci-fi, Horror, or exploitation movies, shot for less than industry standard. There really is no other applicable designation. By nature B-Movies are all meant to be "bad" in some way, because filmmakers understand what they can and cannot do with the budget they are given. If you have a $5 million total budget to make a movie about a genetically mutated crocodile that goes on a killing spree, your movie is going to suck, because the CRAPPY, CHEESY effects that are within your price range for this are going to suck up 2 million of your budget over the two to six months that it takes to create maybe 20 minutes of footage. Your script, acting, lighting, score, editing, foley, permits, dv or filmstock, transportation, room and board, crew, mastering, and etc. are going to eat through that last 3 million in about six to eight weeks. You better hope the weather cooperates, and learn to shoot fast!
post #23 of 43
I'm going to wear mother fucking snakes in a mother fucking plane to this movie. w00t, got it all out :P --Wade
post #24 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by lupin23rd
I saw and enjoyed both Snakes on a Plane and Tokyo Drift...

me too hahah

oh yeah, and for the record I wore:

Black Alphanumeric hoodie
OD colored Uniqlo tee
Nudie RRDG
Royal Elastic sneakers
post #25 of 43
Forget SNAKES ON A PLANE - now it's all about WANTED UNDEAD OR ALIVE, the zombie-western.

post #26 of 43
IMHO this movie proves the truism that no one ever went broke underestimating the American public.
post #27 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim
I'm not really offended, I just think that your reason for not going to see it sucks. Especially if you went to go see Tokyo Drift. SoaP is in my opinion, a better movie.

I think here that there is a disparity of opinion about what a "b" movie is.
Just so everyone knows... historically, a B-movie was a short or a secondary filler movie that played along with the "A feature" or "A movie". Roger Corman, who is often termed "King of the B movies" would be the first to point out that he did NOT in fact make B movies, since the custom of the double feature had died out before he started making them, he made low budget "exploitation films".

Regardless, the exploitation genre was catagorized in with the sci-fi and horror genre's to create the base of the modern definition of a "B-movie". In the 1970's there was a resurgance in the production of exploitation, sci-fi, and horror movies, thanks to New Line Cinema, Canon, Golan Globus, Film Ventures, and Independant International Films. Almost ALL these films were lower budget than your typical studio fare, and many were not released widely. At the advent of cable television and video, many of them skipped the theater circuit entirely and went straight to cable, VHS, or Betamax. the B-movie directors in the 1980's, John Carpenter, Sam Raimi, Roger Corman, and etc. frequently spent millions of dollars on their films. Escape from NY's budget is anywhere from $5.5 million to over $7 million, and this is 1976/77 money. That wasn't even a lot for a movie BACK THEN! That was slightly below average.

There are a handful of movies out there that were made for less than a million dollars in the modern age, Evil Dead, El Mariachi, and The Blair Witch Project are the three that come to mind, but its not a realistic goal and hasn't been since the early 70's. The cost of film stock and processing, or recently DV media, effects, and processing has made the sub $1 million dollar movie pretty unreasonable.

Basically in Seattle we are talking about:
One exterior location, one interior, five shooting days, less than a handful of principal non union actors, minimal crew, minimal sound effects, home made visual effects, no post pro or camera effects, three takes or less for every scene, handheld DV cameras or homemade dollys, self editing, self color correction and sound, and REALLY knowing what you are doing in an editing suite and are capable of keeping your onsite editing down to about 8-10 hours. Then maybe you have a 90 minute movie that will probably suck, and about enough money to promote it in a local newspaper. Thats gonna run your budget up about $100,000+ depending on where you shoot and what sort of permits you have to get. Film will cost more, take longer to edit, and ultimately will probably look worse than DV at that price point. So basically, unless you come up with a concept film, like Blair Witch, that utilizes crappy work as part of the atmosphere, your movie is probably going to sit on a distributors shelf until the building is condemned. Quality wise, probably in between what your home movies look like, and the cheesy re-inactments on America's Most Wanted.

The 70's and early 80's saw sci-fi and horror take off in popularity, causing the line between b-movie and big budget A movie to blur. This is why the modern definition of "B" is so important.

"B movies" are effectively sci-fi, Horror, or exploitation movies, shot for less than industry standard. There really is no other applicable designation. By nature B-Movies are all meant to be "bad" in some way, because filmmakers understand what they can and cannot do with the budget they are given. If you have a $5 million total budget to make a movie about a genetically mutated crocodile that goes on a killing spree, your movie is going to suck, because the CRAPPY, CHEESY effects that are within your price range for this are going to suck up 2 million of your budget over the two to six months that it takes to create maybe 20 minutes of footage. Your script, acting, lighting, score, editing, foley, permits, dv or filmstock, transportation, room and board, crew, mastering, and etc. are going to eat through that last 3 million in about six to eight weeks. You better hope the weather cooperates, and learn to shoot fast!


Nevertheless, I ain't paying 10 bucks to see a movie I can watch on the sci-fi channel. Like Python Vs. Boa... now that was a good movie. Snakes on a Plane maybe when it is on video, and only if I am trashed, and only if I can talk through the entire movie, and only if I can make fun of Sam Jackson.

I see your point, but still don't agree that low budge movies are technically "B-movies" because the director/producer knows they can't make it well because of budge concerns. It was the intention of making this movie "bad" meaning cheaply, and I guarantee it comes back with a bigger budget when it is Snakes on a Plane 2: slither or die.
post #28 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnrswitch
I see your point, but still don't agree that low budge movies are technically "B-movies" because the director/producer knows they can't make it well because of budge concerns.
No, my point is that low budget sci-fi, exploitation, and horror movies are ALL B-movies. They just happen to be BAD because of their budget. Either that or they stumble upon an original idea that can be done for less money than is normally possible.
Quote:
It was the intention of making this movie "bad" meaning cheaply, and I guarantee it comes back with a bigger budget when it is Snakes on a Plane 2: slither or die.
Yeah, most B movies are made with the intention of them being cheap. Thats the whole point of making B movies. Make them cheap because your chances of making a profit from them increase dramatically the less it actually costs to produce. And I'd probably agree with you on the sequel having a higher budget, because almost all sucessfull B-Movies with sequels have bigger budget sequels. Evil Dead 2 and Army of Darkness, Escape from LA, Desperado and Once Upon A Time In Mexico, Blair Witch 2, Leprechaun 2, Aliens, Phantasm II, The Excorcist II, Shaft In Africa, The Road Warrior, Dawn of the Dead, Bride of Reanimator, etc. It is VERY RARE for a B-Movie sequel NOT to double the budget of the first. Its a general film rule, because the sequel usually aims to be "bigger and better" than the original. Oh and Python v.s. Boa was fun. But also is higher budget than any of the films preceding it. (Python, Python2, and New Alcatraz) Still not as much as a feature film, since it was made for TV, but a few million nonetheless.
post #29 of 43
The list of bad/dumb films I need to see keeps growing - I'll probably add SOaP. I still need to see Doom. Have I mentioned that Air Force One is one of the worst films I have seen? Deja vu?
post #30 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by skalogre
The list of bad/dumb films I need to see keeps growing - I'll probably add SOaP. I still need to see Doom.
Have I mentioned that Air Force One is one of the worst films I have seen?
Deja vu?

The list of bad/dumb films will never stop growing, you need to play serious catch up.
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