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Trouble with Topys

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Maybe I got shoddy work done, or maybe it's the way I walk, but many of my topys are peeling away from the tips of the sole at the toe.

I've even taken them back to the cobbler and he applied more bonding, but the same thing happens again after maybe 10 wears.

Is this a common topy problem? Or was the work just poorly done? Or perhaps it's the way I walk, I dunno
post #2 of 16
Use metal toe-taps as well.
post #3 of 16
I think it is the way you walk. You probably twist the toe section of your shoes. You will probably do better with Top-taps.
post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by furo View Post
Maybe I got shoddy work done, or maybe it's the way I walk, but many of my topys are peeling away from the tips of the sole at the toe.

I've even taken them back to the cobbler and he applied more bonding, but the same thing happens again after maybe 10 wears.

Is this a common topy problem? Or was the work just poorly done? Or perhaps it's the way I walk, I dunno

Work done poorly.
he probably take short cut and only sand sole of shoe,
he need to also sand topy so it attach proper,
many shoe repair don't sand topy so it lift.
Find another repair place.
post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by furo View Post
Maybe I got shoddy work done, or maybe it's the way I walk, but many of my topys are peeling away from the tips of the sole at the toe.

I've even taken them back to the cobbler and he applied more bonding, but the same thing happens again after maybe 10 wears.

Is this a common topy problem? Or was the work just poorly done? Or perhaps it's the way I walk, I dunno

Does the cobbler tell you to come back again at least 24 hours later?

I was in a rush for a flight once and told him I needed it within 2 hours and that was the only time it separated. He said you need time for the adhesive to set, or they will separate.

Once it is separated, it would be best to remove the entire piece, sand the thing down and bond them again rather than just to work on the affected areas.

If this is not the case, then you probably need toe taps in addition to topy.
post #6 of 16
I have stopped years ago having Topys added, as I used to have this problem all the time. As a matter of fact, I do not lift my feet very well and I always kick on pavement stones and the like; the left foot is worse than the right one. I know, as a child I should have listened to my mother and grandmother: "Lift your feet, boy.". It's to late now to change my walk, so I'll have to live with my shortcomings (don't we all).

I have learned through bitter experience and I will no longer wear any rubber-soled shoes, where there is not an additional row of stitching holding the soles. That rules out not only Topys, but many Vibram-type soles which rely on the glue connection: the shoe might be stitched, but that stitching goes only down to the middle-sole which then provides a platform for the cemented (glued) connection.
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by bengal-stripe View Post
I have stopped years ago having Topys added, as I used to have this problem all the time. As a matter of fact, I do not lift my feet very well and I always kick on pavement stones and the like; the left foot is worse than the right one. I know, as a child I should have listened to my mother and grandmother: "Lift your feet, boy.". It's to late now to change my walk, so I'll have to live with my shortcomings (don't we all). I have learned through bitter experience and I will no longer wear any rubber-soled shoes, where there is not an additional row of stitching holding the soles. That rules out not only Topys, but many Vibram-type soles which rely on the glue connection: the shoe might be stitched, but that stitching goes only down to the middle-sole which then provides a platform for the cemented (glued) connection.
^+100 And you'll forgive me if I add "doh!" to the general concept.
post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bengal-stripe View Post
I have stopped years ago having Topys added, as I used to have this problem all the time. As a matter of fact, I do not lift my feet very well and I always kick on pavement stones and the like; the left foot is worse than the right one. I know, as a child I should have listened to my mother and grandmother: “Lift your feet, boy.”. It’s to late now to change my walk, so I’ll have to live with my shortcomings (don’t we all).

I have learned through bitter experience and I will no longer wear any rubber-soled shoes, where there is not an additional row of stitching holding the soles. That rules out not only Topys, but many Vibram-type soles which rely on the glue connection: the shoe might be stitched, but that stitching goes only down to the middle-sole which then provides a platform for the cemented (glued) connection.

This is an interesting point. I guess we are both "toe draggers" then.

I also noticed that a pair of triple soled shoes with a bottom sestriere rubber sole are breaking away between the bottom and middle layer, right at the tip of the shoe. I noticed immediately after catching the toe in a crack in the floor as I drug my toe, a typical "toe drag" for people like you and I.
post #9 of 16
I have Topy put on all my leather soled shoes and have yet to run into the problem you're describing. Maybe poor work? myke
post #10 of 16
I've been using topys for years and yeah, if you stub your toe on a step or something it may break the glue bond. Answer...glue it back down and your done. Contact cement, crazy glue, whatever. I've actually worn right through a pair and have had them redone. All my soles are the same thickness as they were when new. I'll never resole leather soles again.
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by upnorth View Post
I was in a rush for a flight once and told him I needed it within 2 hours and that was the only time it separated. He said you need time for the adhesive to set, or they will separate.

you're in a rush and you think about applying topys to your shoes, that's next level shit...
post #12 of 16
Have your cobbler taper the edge of the topy at a 45 degree angle. It should eliminate it pulling away when you walk. Also, a toe plate on top of the topy is another way to protect the very front of the sole. Both the sole and the topy needs to be sanded and using a premium cement will hold the bond much better than the cheaper cements available to the trade.
post #13 of 16
That's the way to protect Topys:




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post #14 of 16
You need something like this (image courtesy Nick V from B.Nelson)



I got one pair done similarly with inset metal toe-taps and topy and I really like the combo. Nick did a great job.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Harrydog View Post
I just had Nick put taps on four pairs. I dropped them off on Monday and picked them up on Friday. Outstanding job. Better than the ones Edward Green put on a recent MTO I did. For some reason EG used rounded head screw instead of flat screws. Had me worried about my wood floors until I wore them on pavement to wear them down a bit.

Nick's shop did a great job. I dropped off five more pair when I picked up the first four. Will follow that up with another five or so and that will pretty much take care of my main rotation. Having some wear does not seem to prevent the installation of the taps.

I don't find them loud at all. They save from wearing the toes. They look very neat and clean.
I find the nailed on teflon or metal taps to be very unattractive. Compare:

A new G&G with nailed on taps



To a pair of EG Nick just did:





Granted, the G&G are new, but once worn, the inset taps will look much more finished and refined. If you are going to pay 1K+ for shoes, why cut corners with a cheepo installation on the taps. I suspect that many people don't have access to a place to have it done well.

Now we have Nick!
post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by srivats View Post
You need something like this (image courtesy Nick V from B.Nelson)


Looks pretty good, but what did that cost? I live near Boston so not sure if someone around here can do this
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