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Gaijin, prease! - Page 10

post #136 of 200
^^^ Yes I have. Its not too bad, just tastes like salt. I had never even heard of it till a buddy of mine (Japanese) ordered it at a sushi place. I was kinda apprehensive about trying it but that may have been because I had just eaten okra/natto.
post #137 of 200
Gaijin, prease! Heading back not only to/for teh Suzuka really really boring F1 on Oct 8-10 so suggestions for a place near there Nagoya etc to stay as teh JTB etc 'tour package' cartel want silly yen$... US$1000/night for teh Hilton even LeoPalace is asking US$250/night... Yelp... Yokoso.
post #138 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acéphale View Post
Gaijin, prease!

Heading back not only to/for teh Suzuka really really boring F1 on Oct 8-10 so suggestions for a place near there Nagoya etc to stay as teh JTB etc 'tour package' cartel want silly yen$... US$1000/night for teh Hilton even LeoPalace is asking US$250/night...

Yelp... Yokoso.

Stay in Nagoya for the two nights and take the limited express to Suzuka. Thats what I did when I went to the Pokka Japan Super GT a few years ago. Having a paddock pass for the Yellow Hat section of the pit made it much more entertaining.
post #139 of 200
I haven't even been, but i'm beginning to understand why the japanese don't like gaijin's. The gaijin trying to pick-up local japanse girls are funny as hell, there has to be more.
post #140 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by hboogz View Post
I haven't even been, but i'm beginning to understand why the japanese don't like gaijin's. The gaijin trying to pick-up local japanse girls are funny as hell, there has to be more.

+1 Exactly.

The reason they are not liked is because they do a lot of crazy stuff they would never think of doing at home.
post #141 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragon View Post
+1 Exactly.

The reason they are not liked is because they do a lot of crazy stuff they would never think of doing at home.

Doesn't everyone do crazy shit when not home (not that I am defending stupid ass gaijin makin us normal people look bad). Japanese Men and Women go in sex tours of Thailand, or when in the US I have known a lot of Japanese that did as many drugs as possible and wore sweat pants/shirts every day, even out of the house, but their justification was all the other college students were doing it.
post #142 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by ratboycom View Post
Doesn't everyone do crazy shit when not home (not that I am defending stupid ass gaijin makin us normal people look bad). Japanese Men and Women go in sex tours of Thailand, or when in the US I have known a lot of Japanese that did as many drugs as possible and wore sweat pants/shirts every day, even out of the house, but their justification was all the other college students were doing it.

I think a lot gaijin leave the concept of respect at home. Taking the example above of gaijin hitting on Japanese women...there is nothing wrong with hitting on the women, but the way they do it. They (not everyone) would not hit on women at home the way they do in Japan.

The sex tours and drugs is a little different, I think. That is more commercial/business. For example, I don't think there is anything wrong all the gaijin visiting the soaplands if they want. As for the sweat pants, I think they were just trying to blend in, as that is what everyone wore in the States too
post #143 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragon View Post
I think a lot gaijin leave the concept of respect at home. Taking the example above of gaijin hitting on Japanese women...there is nothing wrong with hitting on the women, but the way they do it. They (not everyone) would not hit on women at home the way they do in Japan.

The sex tours and drugs is a little different, I think. That is more commercial/business. For example, I don't think there is anything wrong all the gaijin visiting the soaplands if they want. As for the sweat pants, I think they were just trying to blend in, as that is what everyone wore in the States too

I suppose you do have a point. Though are you limiting your definition of Gaijin to Westerners especially Americans? You know of the Halloween Train right?
Those not in the know, its when around Halloween a large group of foreigners get really drunk and or high and invade the Yamanote line in Tokyo (big circle line that covers most of the major neighborhoods), they then proceed to cause shit, starting fights, yelling, jumping off the walls/hanging from the handle bars, etc. Eventually the cops/train security intervene, but it is the fact that it happens on a yearly basis is the biggest black eye on the foreigner community here.

I think what I was trying to get at with the sweat pants was that, just because Americans do it doesn't mean it's right. Then again, a very large portion of the American students at my school dress like shit on a daily basis just like they would in the US, so they are not trying to blend in at all either, or they dress like Japan is Halloween every day. This is especially true for the Otaku crowd and the visual kei fans.
post #144 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by ratboycom View Post
I suppose you do have a point. Though are you limiting your definition of Gaijin to Westerners especially Americans? You know of the Halloween Train right?
Those not in the know, its when around Halloween a large group of foreigners get really drunk and or high and invade the Yamanote line in Tokyo (big circle line that covers most of the major neighborhoods), they then proceed to cause shit, starting fights, yelling, jumping off the walls/hanging from the handle bars, etc. Eventually the cops/train security intervene, but it is the fact that it happens on a yearly basis is the biggest black eye on the foreigner community here.

I think what I was trying to get at with the sweat pants was that, just because Americans do it doesn't mean it's right. Then again, a very large portion of the American students at my school dress like shit on a daily basis just like they would in the US, so they are not trying to blend in at all either, or they dress like Japan is Halloween every day. This is especially true for the Otaku crowd and the visual kei fans.

That's quite obnoxious what you described.

What is "Otaku" and "visual kei"?
post #145 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by HORNS View Post
That's quite obnoxious what you described.

What is "Otaku" and "visual kei"?

Otaku are "Fan Boys", often of anime, manga, video games, etc. They're kind of like comic book, WoW, comicon, anime geeks over here.

From Densha Otoko (actually a pretty decent j-drama):




Visual Kei means "Visual Style" in which the fans wear over the top outfits, makeup, hairstyles, etc for maximum visual effect; usually trying to emulate their favorite Visual Kei rock and pop stars.

post #146 of 200
Question for my Gaijin brothers:
If you hear someone talking about you on the train or otherwise in public, do you use that as an opportunity to start a conversation or do you just let it mellow? I mean this for positive things, negative shit I usually just give them a nasty understanding look or tell them to "fuck off" straight to their face.

I often hear kids around my neighborhood talking about how freakishly tall I am (only 190cm). That situation I usually look at them and smile and tell them my height. Most of the time it kinda freaks them out that I knew what they were saying and could respond.

I occasionally hear people/couples on the train who are trying to figure out what my B&N Nook is. Usually they are like A:"is that an iPad?" B:"nah, I dont think so. What is it?" A couple was talking about it for a good five minutes, I considered talking to them but didnt.

And of course, I hear the occasional girl(s) say I look cool when I walk by. Most of the time, if they are cute, I turn and give them a smile, if not I keep walking.
post #147 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by ratboycom View Post
Question for my Gaijin brothers: If you hear someone talking about you on the train or otherwise in public, do you use that as an opportunity to start a conversation or do you just let it mellow? I mean this for positive things, negative shit I usually just give them a nasty understanding look or tell them to "fuck off" straight to their face. I often hear kids around my neighborhood talking about how freakishly tall I am (only 190cm). That situation I usually look at them and smile and tell them my height. Most of the time it kinda freaks them out that I knew what they were saying and could respond. I occasionally hear people/couples on the train who are trying to figure out what my B&N Nook is. Usually they are like A:"is that an iPad?" B:"nah, I dont think so. What is it?" A couple was talking about it for a good five minutes, I considered talking to them but didnt. And of course, I hear the occasional girl(s) say I look cool when I walk by. Most of the time, if they are cute, I turn and give them a smile, if not I keep walking.
It's situations like this, for which I usually carry a squirt gun filled with kerosene and a book of matches.
post #148 of 200
I get that height thing too. I just laugh when adults talk openly that I must be 2meters but get surprised when I tell my real height. Kids stare when they see me walking but I just smile.

In the past, I used to get a lot of middle school kids coming up to me trying to use their newly learned English. But now less so because more kids learning English privately much earlier.
post #149 of 200
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ratboycom View Post
Question for my Gaijin brothers:
If you hear someone talking about you on the train or otherwise in public, do you use that as an opportunity to start a conversation or do you just let it mellow? I mean this for positive things, negative shit I usually just give them a nasty understanding look or tell them to "fuck off" straight to their face.


I usually ignore it. When I first came I would sometimes make eye contact if a cute girl made a "kakkoii na" comment but that would usually scare the crap out of them. I had two high school girls on the train talking about how big my nose was the other day. I just ignored them.
post #150 of 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alter View Post
I usually ignore it. When I first came I would sometimes make eye contact if a cute girl made a "kakkoii na" comment but that would usually scare the crap out of them. I had two high school girls on the train talking about how big my nose was the other day. I just ignored them.

Yeah, just approaching or even acknowledging most girls freaks the shit out of them, its either the foreign nature of me or the fact that most Japanese guys are wieners and dont approach girls so girls get freaked out when a guy flirts with them. In many ways it explains the low birth rate.
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