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Who were some of your worst, rudest, and/or most ignorant customers? - Page 36

post #526 of 654
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cold war painter View Post



Not that common, but definitely exists:


"lanolin sensitization has remained at a relatively low and constant rate even in a high-risk population"

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...277.x/abstract


"Among 899 consecutive patients .. 48 females and 12 males, gave a positive reaction to lanolin and/or its derivatives"

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...824.x/abstract

I feel for these people who have to wear polyester suits.
post #527 of 654
Dude, I read about 2/3 of your stories, half the time you come off as a crochety old man with a short fuse - very much like Red Foreman from "That 70's Show" At times you remind me of some salespeople I've met, and since avoided. With some salespeople, you can't just browse the store, or ask one question without being subject to a whole salespitch. A few weeks ago I was at a store admiring a really nice Zegna suit - it was on sale, but the tag didn't actually say what the sale price was (they were in the process of doing markdowns that day.) I asked a guy how much it was, and got a pretty steep response. I would have left it at that, but he proceeded to get me try on like 8 suits I wasn't even interested in, then gave me a dirty look when I didn't buy anything. Another time I was in Brooks Brothers and asked where the gloves were, the salesperson showed me where the gloves were, stood over me, and showed me every single pair of gloves one by one and looked at me like "OK.... now buy something." After 2 or 3 minutes of looking at the gloves, I realized they weren't very nice compared to other ones I saw, and it was pretty awkward since I didn't want to just say "the store across the hall has better stuff then you - kthnxbai" but he wouldn't take a hint. I'm also guessing you work at Moore's or a store like that. Why not get a job at a high-end menswear store? The higher price tags probably weed alot of the riff-raff
post #528 of 654
I just had a wealthy dilettante who told me he is known as "the clothing guy" tell me that bespoke pattern-making is not rocket science or brain surgery. He wanted me to make patterns and clothing for him that he could take to production. (He didn't know what bespoke meant.)

I told him that is true, and asked him how many bespoke tailors there are in Los Angeles, and how many neurosurgeons.

I could clog this thread up with stories from my New York days, which was my whole life up until recently.

If you ever get a call from the former superstar Lauryn Hill, I would suggest not getting too enthusiastic, for example.
post #529 of 654
Oh man, I just remembered this one guy, a pompous Brit who walked in one day a couple of years ago without an appointment. My father looks more Jewish than I because my mother is not Jewish. He said to my father, "Oh good, I have been looking for a Shylock tailor in the States like you." He is lucky I was out at a fitting.
post #530 of 654
Somewhat ironically, we made a lot of clothing for the currently running production of Merchant of Venice on Broadway. Including Al Pacino as... Shylock! I joked to my father that we only got the job so Mr. Pacino could use him as character research. He told me that was not just funny but probably true. We talked about how we knew we were research while we were in London doing Jersey Boys- we caught the British lead who played Frankie Valli (a great guy) following us on the street while we chatted one day! Since JB has so many productions, I have been confused as a Frankie Valli alternate at the theater at almost all of them.
post #531 of 654
Quote:
Originally Posted by FidelCashflow View Post
I'm also guessing you work at Moore's or a store like that. Why not get a job at a high-end menswear store? The higher price tags probably weed alot of the riff-raff

high end stores actually tend to attract riff raff and young kids who like to come in and try on stuff they don't intend to buy, to mess around, take pics of stuff they try on and leave.
post #532 of 654
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacobkozinn View Post
Somewhat ironically, we made a lot of clothing for the currently running production of Merchant of Venice on Broadway. Including Al Pacino as... Shylock!

I joked to my father that we only got the job so Mr. Pacino could use him as character research. He told me that was not just funny but probably true. We talked about how we knew we were research while we were in London doing Jersey Boys- we caught the British lead who played Frankie Valli (a great guy) following us on the street while we chatted one day!

Since JB has so many productions, I have been confused as a Frankie Valli alternate at the theater at almost all of them.

Please shut the fuck up already.
post #533 of 654
Please shut the fuck up already. This is hilarious.
post #534 of 654
The funny thing about wool is that, yes, some people have a lanolin allergy... But with suits, the only place that the wool is actually touching is your legs. I doubt most people with lanolin allergies are affected by wearing lined sport coats made out of wool.
post #535 of 654
Quote:
Originally Posted by CYstyle View Post
high end stores actually tend to attract riff raff and young kids who like to come in and try on stuff they don't intend to buy, to mess around, take pics of stuff they try on and leave.

welll, I mean other than SF'ers....
post #536 of 654
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuitMyself View Post
Your mother has sensitive skin, not an allergy to wool. Tell her to ask her doctor. Wool is composed of the same chemical compund (keratin) as human hair, skin, and nails.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SuitMyself View Post
I feel for these people who have to wear polyester suits.

I didn't want to dignify your idiocy with a serious response, but I did want to ask you if you've trouble tying your shoe laces.
post #537 of 654
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay Gatsby View Post
Please shut the fuck up already.
+1. I popped on his 'bespoke tailoring' site, and he charges $10K for 'membership', before he can even discuss talking about making a suit for you. Sounds like Hermes custom order..
post #538 of 654
Years ago, I worked in a men's clothing store and one of the brands we carried was Belvest. Back then, most people were used to the US sizing (40R, 42R, etc.) only. But, Belvest (and most european clothing) is sized in centimeters. So, our labels showed the closest US sizing equivalents (50cm = 39.5 inches and 52cm = 41 inches).

One day a couple walks in and the wife says that her husband is looking for a sport coat in size 40. So, I pull both the 39.5 and 41 for him to try on. The wife asks me why I pulled two different sizes of the same sport coat. I explain the sizing (as per above). She gets a little miffed and says that her husband is a perfect size 40 and that's what she wants. After a little bit of just letting her rant, she finally just sits down and lets me help the husband.

He tries on both the jackets and we (the tailor, the customer and myself) all agree that the 41 fit the best. At that point, wifey gets all up and arms and says that her husband is a size 40 and that a size 41 is too large. So, the husband says he'll take the 39.5 instead and the tailor does the alterations.

The couple comes back a week after they pick up the SC. Wifey goes directly over to the owner and asks him what size coat is equivalent to a US size 40. The owner responds by repeating exactly the same as I explained above, but he adds that generally he finds that most people who are a size 40 fit into a 41 better. At that point, wifey says that I purposely fit her husband into the wrong size (39.5) and that I didn't know what I was doing. The owner apologizes and swaps out the 39.5 for a 41.

When the couple left, I explained to the owner what happened when I sold them the SC. He smiled, laughed and said, "Welcome to retail."

Another time, a customer walked in to buy a suit. He was about 6'2" and fit into a 41L perfectly. He finds a suit that he loves and I call down the tailor to have it fitted. As the tailor is fitting him, the customer states that he wants the suit to also fit his brother in case he wants to borrow it. We both try to explain to him that it would compromise the fit. The customer states that his brother is very close to his proportions and he doesn't mind if the fit is somewhat compromised, so we wait for his brother to show. As his brother walks into the store, we see that he was about 5'9" and weighed 250 lbs. The look on the tailor's face was priceless...
post #539 of 654
Quote:
Originally Posted by ginlimetonic View Post
+1. I popped on his 'bespoke tailoring' site, and he charges $10K for 'membership', before he can even discuss talking about making a suit for you. Sounds like Hermes custom order..

I truly respect Hermes, more than almost all others. If you talked about me and them in the same sentence, even if just to ridicule me, I am delighted.
post #540 of 654
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomboys View Post

Years ago, I worked in a men's clothing store and one of the brands we carried was Belvest. Back then, most people were used to the US sizing (40R, 42R, etc.) only. But, Belvest (and most european clothing) is sized in centimeters. So, our labels showed the closest US sizing equivalents (50cm = 39.5 inches and 52cm = 41 inches).

One day a couple walks in and the wife says that her husband is looking for a sport coat in size 40. So, I pull both the 39.5 and 41 for him to try on. The wife asks me why I pulled two different sizes of the same sport coat. I explain the sizing (as per above). She gets a little miffed and says that her husband is a perfect size 40 and that's what she wants. After a little bit of just letting her rant, she finally just sits down and lets me help the husband.

He tries on both the jackets and we (the tailor, the customer and myself) all agree that the 41 fit the best. At that point, wifey gets all up and arms and says that her husband is a size 40 and that a size 41 is too large. So, the husband says he'll take the 39.5 instead and the tailor does the alterations.

The couple comes back a week after they pick up the SC. Wifey goes directly over to the owner and asks him what size coat is equivalent to a US size 40. The owner responds by repeating exactly the same as I explained above, but he adds that generally he finds that most people who are a size 40 fit into a 41 better. At that point, wifey says that I purposely fit her husband into the wrong size (39.5) and that I didn't know what I was doing. The owner apologizes and swaps out the 39.5 for a 41.

When the couple left, I explained to the owner what happened when I sold them the SC. He smiled, laughed and said, "Welcome to retail."

Another time, a customer walked in to buy a suit. He was about 6'2" and fit into a 41L perfectly. He finds a suit that he loves and I call down the tailor to have it fitted. As the tailor is fitting him, the customer states that he wants the suit to also fit his brother in case he wants to borrow it. We both try to explain to him that it would compromise the fit. The customer states that his brother is very close to his proportions and he doesn't mind if the fit is somewhat compromised, so we wait for his brother to show. As his brother walks into the store, we see that he was about 5'9" and weighed 250 lbs. The look on the tailor's face was priceless...

Stupid woman.

And stupid grown man who wants his grown brother to wear/borrow his suits. Only teenage girls share and borrow clothing, not grown men.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Metlin View Post

I didn't want to dignify your idiocy with a serious response, but I did want to ask you if you've trouble tying your shoe laces.

I can tie my shoe laces just fine. I can also tie a bow tie.


Quote:
Originally Posted by musicguy View Post

The funny thing about wool is that, yes, some people have a lanolin allergy... But with suits, the only place that the wool is actually touching is your legs. I doubt most people with lanolin allergies are affected by wearing lined sport coats made out of wool.

+1

Right on, brother!


Quote:
Originally Posted by CYstyle View Post

high end stores actually tend to attract riff raff and young kids who like to come in and try on stuff they don't intend to buy, to mess around, take pics of stuff they try on and leave.

+1

You said it, brother!
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