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If you had Bill Gates' and Micheal Dell's money for a month... - Page 2

post #16 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Ivan, you should also source out some YSL for Dior, Trapeze Collection 1958.

If I had that amount of money, I would make Louis XIV look modest.
Though I don't doubt that you have the vision, I doubt that even Gates' and Dell's fortunes would be enough to build Versailles. As a matter of fact I don't know if that level of craftsmanship can be had for any price these days.
post #17 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edward Appleby
Though I don't doubt that you have the vision, I doubt that even Gates' and Dell's fortunes would be enough to build Versailles. As a matter of fact I don't know if that level of craftsmanship can be had for any price these days.
I recall reading that Versailles would cost about 9 billion to build today. And I have no idea about China's Forbidden City, which has 9,999 rooms.
post #18 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivan Kipling
Yves Saint Laurent is a genius. His designs at the time, were deemed too avant-garde for the Dior clientele. By avant-garde, we're talking turtle neck, under a suit jacket. Forget the crocodile vests and the boots. He was ahead of his time; thankfully YSL was able to go out on his own. Did you know that Pierre Berge and YSL, met at Dior's funeral?

Much as I love YSL couture . . . his rive gauche holds a special place in my heart, not just because my sister wore it for more than 25 years, but because the rive gauche line often went further than the couture, in terms of thought and experimentation. And to get back, to this particular thread's purpose . . . I'd hunt down each and every Saint Laurent coat for women, that I could procure. They were my favorites.

The shawl lapel coat displays a perfect fit.

YSL Rive Gauche was chic, possibly even more chic than the couture due to its inherent RTW qualities.
post #19 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
I recall reading that Versailles would cost about 9 billion to build today. And I have no idea about China's Forbidden City, which has 9,999 rooms.
Of course, you've also got a spectacular amount of help, and again, I really don't know that the skills to create something on par with the utter decadence of Versailles exist in craftsmen today.

Plus, it's not like Dell and Gates together have that much in liquid assets. Of course, this entire exercise is pure fantasy, so I don't know why I'm being such a nitpick.
post #20 of 34
With that much money I'd buy Louis and Wilkes for my own private use, then I'd buy a Gulfstream and fly to Naples and buy 5 "K" suits from Kiton, do 3 dozen Anna Mattuozzo bespoke shirts, then fly to London for bespoke shoes...or Tokyo, maybe for Suzuki shoes.

...or I'd just settle for a second home in Italy.
post #21 of 34
I found this on wiki. Interesting, though of course spectacularly devoid of any citation.
Quote:
The 2001 McDougal Littell text book, World History: Patterns of Interactions, places the cost of building at approximately 2 billion dollars (USD) in 1994. This figure is regarded by many as a gross underestimate of the costs of the estate. [citation needed] Surviving government records from the period have mentioned the figure of 65 million "golden" livres. It is unclear whether the "golden" livre referenced is meant to mean the golden "Louis D'Or" coin (which was worth 24 livres) or the standard livre currency. In any case, if these figures are to be believed and one uses today's values for Gold ($600 per ounce) and Silver ($12 per ounce), the cost of the Versailles estate soars to a minimum cost of $12,480,000,000 and a maximum cost of $299,520,000,000.
(My emphasis)
post #22 of 34
The wiki bit is a direct rip from Answers.com article on Versailles, that article notes that the memoirs of duc de Saint-Simon say that more money was spent on Château of Marly than on Varsailles. Oh, I'd spend the money by commissioning every single bespoke tailor in the world to make me 1,000 garments a piece and build a vast mansion to accomdate such a collection. Every material and every shade of color would be featured. It'd be brilliant. Complete with a digitial rotating and collection system, and probably a dewey decimal coding system, so that I could find the right garment without spending days hunting for it.
post #23 of 34
I wouldn't buy clothes, I'd buy candy, comic books, video games, and hookers. Oh, and a mountain of blow.

post #24 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim
I wouldn't buy clothes, I'd buy candy, comic books, video games, and hookers. Oh, and a mountain of blow.


At least you're honest ;p

Anyway, I'd make full use of those funds to get vicuna everything. I'd have overcoats, suits, sports jackets, pants, and just about anything else I could think of made of vicuna. Anyone who's touched the fabrics from LP's Zenit collection knows what i'm talking about. Cashmere feels like regular wool compared to vicuna.

Aside from that, what Z said, except I'd probably go a bit more diverse on the shoes. Oh, and I'd go crazy with Cucinelli, Malo, Avon Celli and LP cashmere sweaters, and I'd get enough cashmere socks to last a lifetime as well as cashmere robes, PJs, and sweats :P
post #25 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt
I would look somewhere more stylish than England for my tailoring. Why the Mahon shirts? People seem to be so interested in them, but they sound very iffy to me. His suits look nice, but I would definitely head south.
How is England less stylish than other places? It simply depends what "style" you are looking for, my friend. The Mahon shirts are because many of us would want a soft, natural feeling shirt to go along with the soft construction of his suits.
post #26 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jovan
How is England less stylish than other places? It simply depends what "style" you are looking for, my friend. The Mahon shirts are because many of us would want a soft, natural feeling shirt to go along with the soft construction of his suits.
There are much softer shirts that are better made than Rayner and Sturgess. I love very soft tailoring. I wear shirts that are as soft as you could ever find. I think that Mahon's tailoring looks really nice. I tend to find British styling slightly staid. I like the look of more handstitching. If I was limited to Britain, I would certainly look at Mahon first, but I am not. Also, as soft as his clothing is, it is not as soft as a middle of the road Italian feel. English clothing is different. It is always correct, but it is never as luxurious.
post #27 of 34
Um... whatever you say.
post #28 of 34
Do I have to give it back at the end of the month? If so, I'd invest it and have, say, $300mm, to play with after I'd returned it. If I could do whatever I wanted with it and return what's left at the end of the month, I'd spend a bunch (clothes, antiques, wine, books etc), found a free university dedicated to actual learning, and give the rest to worthwhile charities and medical research. I'd tell Bill and Mike "sorry Dbags, but you guys would only have wasted it on vanity projects". Then I'd give them cabfare to get home.
post #29 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jovan
Um... whatever you say.
You are probably right since I have seen and tried both .
post #30 of 34
That doesn't mean your opinion is correct.
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