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Why do people make fun of others that buy quality things? - Page 3

post #31 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by word View Post
People prioritize their spending differently. How is this hard to figure out?

There are people that can't justify spending money on anything nice.

I have an old friend that came to my old loft, which was not exceptionally nice, but very nice for the city I was living in. He said, "I know you like nice things, but how often are you really here"?

Well, I'm at work for 8 hours, so assuming you're talking about weekdays, I spend 2/3 of my day here. If you can't justify spending money on your home, what can you justify spending money on? There are people that literally own nothing at all that is quality, nice, or unique. Most of them probably can't afford these things, but even if they could, they probably wouldn't seek them out.
post #32 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by computerpro3 View Post
This is something that has been really bothering me lately. It seems I can't talk to anyone about the stuff that I either own or enjoy without getting made fun of - even when they bring it up!

Even if an item will save money in the long term, is clearly high quality, offers health benefits, or just plain improves the quality of your life, people still don't seem to get it. Perhaps it's just the social circles I walk in, but it's starting to get to me.

For example - I spent $450 on a pre-owned Miele vacuum recently since I have mold and dust problems in my place and the Miele was a quality 100% sealed HEPA vacuum in my pricerange. A friend saw it sitting in the corner recently and asked about it. He eventually asked me how much it cost and I told him that I got it for about half the price or retail since I bought it used. He looked at me and told me I was a complete idiot for spending $450 on a vacuum.

Stuff like this happens to me all the time, ranging from my Thinkpad, to the Glaser bag I'm considering, a quality keyboard for my desktop, my audio system, clothing, etc, etc.

And on the flipside, these people have no problem dropping $400 on a poorly constructed Coach bag or $120 on Kenneth Cole square toed shoes.

It seems like this forum is the only place where people understand that value is not what something costs up front, but what you get from the item long term.

I just don't get it.

I think if you actually truly like something, and you can afford it, then nobody should question why. I have a few things that people probably think are a ridiculous waste of money, but at the end of the day, when I use them, it makes me happy that I get to enjoy owning them...cant really put a price on ones own happiness.
post #33 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian1976 View Post
I think if you actually truly like something, and you can afford it, then nobody should question why. I have a few things that people probably think are a ridiculous waste of money, but at the end of the day, when I use them, it makes me happy that I get to enjoy owning them...cant really put a price on ones own happiness.
+100. Agree, completely.
post #34 of 105
people who constantly ask other people how much their possessions cost are tedious and make me not want to hang out with them people who constantly talk about their possessions and how much they cost are equally tedious, though
post #35 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by suited View Post
There are people that literally own nothing at all that is quality, nice, or unique. Most of them probably can't afford these things
Ugggh! You mean POOR people?

Quote:
Originally Posted by HRoi View Post
people who constantly ask other people how much their possessions cost are tedious and make me not want to hang out with them

people who constantly talk about their possessions and how much they cost are equally tedious, though
And CRASS people? Where are we?
post #36 of 105
Quote:
He looked at me and told me I was a complete idiot for spending $450 on a vacuum.
He's right. Especially if you don't have serious liquid assets before pissing money like this. That's called "ghetto"
post #37 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spats View Post
And CRASS people? Where are we?
well, all bets are off in the safe haven of Styleforvm, of course
post #38 of 105
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reevolving View Post
He's right. Especially if you don't have serious liquid assets before pissing money like this. That's called "ghetto"
Pissing money away on my health? And on merely a $450 purchase? Guess we have the uneducated on SF as well.
post #39 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by computerpro3 View Post
Pissing money away on my health? And on merely a $450 purchase? Guess we have the uneducated on SF as well.
That's not what he means. He's trying to say you need to spend within your means. If you make $100,000+ a years and work from home, $450 vacuum would be a good investment since you spend most of your time at home, the hygiene improvement would be beneficial and you make enough to buy it without impacting your disposable income too much. Now if you make $35,000 and are a traveling salesperson, that's a dumb idea.
post #40 of 105
Simple explanation: for most people, beyond basic utility, value is determined by peer perception. They lack either the patience, willingness, or ability to develop a taste for things. When they do indulge in luxuries that happen to be truly special, it's invariably because a desire for status or prestige led them to it, and then they only feign appreciation. The truth is they can't tell the difference at all. This describes 90% of all BigLaw lawyers.
post #41 of 105
The more important question is why are you even friends with these kinds of people who like to criticize you?
post #42 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by cchen View Post
The more important question is why are you even friends with these kinds of people who like to criticize you?

Come on, that's not fair. If I waited to make friends only with people who understand my material tastes, I'd hardly have any. Anyway, it's fortunately pretty unimportant whether your friends like your clothes, your car, or your appliance choices.
post #43 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
Simple explanation: for most people, beyond basic utility, value is determined by peer perception. They lack either the patience, willingness, or ability to develop a taste for things. When they do indulge in luxuries that happen to be truly special, it's invariably because a desire for status or prestige led them to it, and then they only feign appreciation. The truth is they can't tell the difference at all.

This describes 90% of all BigLaw lawyers.

What I hate is when well-moneyed philistines ruin a perfectly good thing for everyone else. A great example is wine. I have spent a good deal of the past 9 years learning, from the ground up, how to taste and appreciate and collect and care for wine. I do not have a multi-million-dollar cellar and even more expensive collection. Far from it. But unfortunately -- due to all the dumb money that has poured wine "collecting" just as a way to blow off excess cash -- collectors are now judged purely by the total monetary value of their collections. Someone like Jamie Dimon, for instance, is instantly catapulted to "greatest wine appreciator evAr!" simply because he has the spare $30 mil to drop on a collection. Art collecting works in pretty much the same way, and unfortunately, that's another hobby I've spent many good years getting into.

I am infinitely more impressed with someone who's got a story for every bottle, or someone who has clearly defined and articulated preferences with art, than with big timers who drop stacks just because they can. Unfortunately, pretty much no one else in the world feels this way.
post #44 of 105
^^^ I sympathize. I hate talking to people about anything I enjoy because it's almost guaranteed that I'll get annoyed by their pomposity and posturing. Ignorance is forgivable--we each have different interests, after all--but snobbery disgusts me. My real issue is when people project their own snobbery onto me. The acquaintances that know I like watches, clothes, food, etc., often assume I like them for status-oriented reasons. On the occasions where I actually try to explain why I like certain things, I tend to draw blank, confused stares. Usually, I just nod and smile, then try to change the subject.
post #45 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arrogant Bastard View Post
Someone like Jamie Dimon, for instance, is instantly catapulted to "greatest wine appreciator evAr!" simply because he has the spare $30 mil to drop on a collection. ......Unfortunately, pretty much no one else in the world feels this way.

Great post. So true. Applies to logo based clothing as well. But, I think lots of people push back on this. Almost everyone in the wine world bashes Parker scoring points whores, etc. I assume you've seen Mondovino?
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