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Crate of Shackleton's Antarctic Whisky Found Perfectly Preserved

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
http://en.mercopress.com/2010/08/14/...did-not-freeze

The famed traveller brought the liquor with him during his 1907 Nimrod expedition and the cases were ultimately discovered encased in ice under the floor boards of the hut.

Whyte and Mackay master blender Richard Paterson previously called it "a gift from the heavens for whisky lovers... If the contents can be confirmed, safely extracted and analyzed, the original blend may be able to be replicated. Given the original recipe no longer exists, this may open a door into history."
post #2 of 23
In before Pio sees this and decides to pick up "whiskey preserving" as his new hobby.
post #3 of 23
It's like the Catherina von Flensburg for booze!
post #4 of 23
Cool and all, but one question: if the blend was so great, why didn't the company that bought them out save the recipie? They'll sell a bunch anyway if they hype of the Shackleton stuff though. Hell, I would be tempted to grab a bottle just for the heck of it.
post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
It's like the Catherina von Flensburg for booze!
Exactly what I thought... I read this story when it came out and thought about how there will be and endless supply of it making it the new salvaged Russian Reindeer.
post #6 of 23
who's going to drink it?
post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nosu3 View Post
who's going to drink it?

post #8 of 23
I heard from a friend in the industry who intimated, but did no confirm that he tasted it, that the whisky is not very good at all. Rather crudely distilled and lacking complexity.
post #9 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ama View Post
I heard from a friend in the industry who intimated, but did no confirm that he tasted it, that the whisky is not very good at all. Rather crudely distilled and lacking complexity.

Why wouldn't he confirm he tasted it?
post #10 of 23
I read about this..I think on the BBC. I thought the whole point was just to get the recipe out and make it the same since the recipe was lost...not drink it. At any rate, a limited edition bottle will come out soon after this.

A few years back, they were selling what's left of the Tsarist imperial wine cellar and I think there were even tastings for that.
post #11 of 23
I guess I am no Scotch expert, but A) how could they determine the blend from just analyzing the whiskey since all the components that went into the blend are long gone? and B) when I visited Johnnie Walker they told me that the blend for their whiskeys changes every year because what is coming out of the cask is always different. The goal is to create the same flavor profile from year to year but in order to do that they have to alter the composition and proportion of the constituent whiskeys.
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ama View Post
I heard from a friend in the industry who intimated, but did no confirm that he tasted it, that the whisky is not very good at all. Rather crudely distilled and lacking complexity.

noone has tasted it.
post #13 of 23
I thought this was relatively old news? Either that, or this is some serious deja vu i'm having.
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
I thought this was relatively old news? Either that, or this is some serious deja vu i'm having.
I thought the same thing at first, but I think there was a recent story about a similar find. Just not Shackleton's whisky.
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post
Why wouldn't he confirm he tasted it?

Cause they aren't sure what they are going to do with it yet. Auction it off as is, try to recreate it, send it to museums, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fwiffo View Post
I read about this..I think on the BBC. I thought the whole point was just to get the recipe out and make it the same since the recipe was lost...not drink it. At any rate, a limited edition bottle will come out soon after this.

A few years back, they were selling what's left of the Tsarist imperial wine cellar and I think there were even tastings for that.

The recipe is likely gone. If they were to recreate it they would have blendmasteres sample it and do their best to put it together with current distillation methods and modern strains of barley.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
I guess I am no Scotch expert, but A) how could they determine the blend from just analyzing the whiskey since all the components that went into the blend are long gone? and B) when I visited Johnnie Walker they told me that the blend for their whiskeys changes every year because what is coming out of the cask is always different. The goal is to create the same flavor profile from year to year but in order to do that they have to alter the composition and proportion of the constituent whiskeys.

They would do just that. Try to recreate it with current stock or products that can make now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post
noone has tasted it.

If you say so... As I said, my friend would not confirm, but I am fairly certain based on my chat that there are people in the industry already trying to replicate it. Those people have obviously nosed and tasted it extensively.
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