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My new F430 - Page 9

post #121 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS
You're joking right? If you can afford the Lambo Murci you can easily afford spare tires for it.

Jon.

I know that wasn't directed to me, regardless if it was, get off your high horse, theres somethings that you dont want to spend alot on, regardless of how much money you have.
post #122 of 181
True, when you buy a car for 200k over you don't expect to have any troubles with it the nearest 5 years.
post #123 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by MOCAZEN
I know that wasn't directed to me, regardless if it was, get off your high horse, theres somethings that you dont want to spend alot on, regardless of how much money you have.

Don't take this the wrong way: but are you on drugs? It's a high performance car capable of 200 mph, and its tires have to be properly warmed up, coupled with the fact that American roads suck, and that sometimes there are items on the road that will destroy your tire; also know as: shit happens.

If it was a manufacturing error, the tire company (or the dealership) would take care of it, seeing as it was only a week old, if not, it was driver error and he has to pony up the dough. He spent that much on the car but is pissed off about the high maintenance costs, then he's just cheap.

Jon.
post #124 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aristocrat
True, when you buy a car for 200k over you don't expect to have any troubles with it the nearest 5 years.

Which is of course ridiculous since most the high-end performance cars have their problems and will never go 5 years problem-free.

Jon.
post #125 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by zjpj83
Not first time, no. And that definitely colors how the dealer deals with you. He knows me very well and likes me very much, and that makes all the difference in the world. It is a very incestuous community in a figurative sense. Once you are in, it's all good; you will get the invites to the Formula One parties, the dealer-sponsored runs, challenge races, etc. And the best way to get on that rolodex is to either be friends with the dealer somehow (which I am) but also to play their game - i.e. buy a used Ferrari from them at slight dealer markup (which I also did way back when). Then you are a customer already, and that counts for a helluva lot.

Dealer markup schemes have become nuts. The secondary market is a bit of a joke, but that's the only way most can get a current model car. You are very correct, though, about getting "in." Once you're in, Ferrari's a slick experience. As an example, while writing this post, I received a recap of the 599 Pan-American event that I missed due to an anniversary/dive trip to Grand Cayman.
post #126 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS
...He spent that much on the car but is pissed off about the high maintenance costs, then he's just cheap.

Jon.

The reality of owning these cars is that acquisition cost is only a portion of what you must spend to operate the vehicle over time. These aren't Honda Camry's. These are ultra-high performance, street-legal, race cars.

F-cars are remarkably durable machines, but they do require maintenance and sometimes repairs. Relatively few are manufactured each year and proper maintenance doesn't come cheap. Everything about them is far more expensive than ordinary vehicles. The happiest owners seem to understand this and, more importantly, can afford both the financial and inconvenience sacrifices.
post #127 of 181
I suppose it's similar to maintaing vintage cars although for vintage you can work on them yourselves sometimes.

La Carrera Panamericana is a vintage rally, I recall?
post #128 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
I suppose it's similar to maintaing vintage cars although for vintage you can work on them yourselves sometimes.

La Carrera Panamericana is a vintage rally, I recall?

Speaking of vintage races, I happened to be in Italy a few years ago and happened across the Millie Migilia or 1000 to Migilia and witnessed an awesome aray of great new and vintage cars. Zjp, have you entered the Gumball? I hear it is an absolute blast.
post #129 of 181
Aren't Ferraris and reliability sort of unknown points? Most people don't use their Ferrari as a daily driver, putting on tens of thousands of miles a year and I've never heard of a newer model Ferrari passing 100K miles which is just a midlife for any typical japanese car. So how would one know how reliable they are if they've never been driven long enough to rate?
post #130 of 181
Thread Starter 
I have not done Gumball, no. Not really my scene
post #131 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by visionology
Aren't Ferraris and reliability sort of unknown points? Most people don't use their Ferrari as a daily driver, putting on tens of thousands of miles a year and I've never heard of a newer model Ferrari passing 100K miles which is just a midlife for any typical japanese car. So how would one know how reliable they are if they've never been driven long enough to rate?

Thats just it, Ferrari's are not typical japanese cars. 100k on a japanese car is about equivalent to 40k on a ferrari. As was stated these cars are high-performance and are made to be driven hard and fast not highway cruisers that are driven everyday to work and back, not to say it cant be done. there are plenty of 308's and 328's around that have 100k+ on them, its not about reliability there about excitment and speed which adds up to wear and tear alot quicker then a common japanese car. I was watching an episode of 5th gear where they got to take an enzo and a mclaren f1 out on the open roads and he mentioned the recommended maintanence on a the F1 costs around 30k every 6,000 miles or something around there.
post #132 of 181
Some of the older Ferraris from the '60s were actually used as daily drivers; some Maseratis such as the 3500 GT were also used as such.

During the '70s they were simply tossed aside as "used cars".
post #133 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by saunderscc
The reality of owning these cars is that acquisition cost is only a portion of what you must spend to operate the vehicle over time. These aren't Honda Camry's. These are ultra-high performance, street-legal, race cars.

So true. I think much of the public is in love with the image of a high performance car, but don't understand what that means. The higher performance a car, the higher its maintenance cost will be. People who buy high performance cars but cannot or will not maintain it properly should not own those cars: it's irresponsible.

--Andre
post #134 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Some of the older Ferraris from the '60s were actually used as daily drivers . . .

For many years throughout the 1960s, Dr. David Love drove his pontoon-fendered 1958 Ferrari Testarossa to work each day at Lawrence Livermore Laboratories. The car had regulation California license and registration at that time.



You can probably see David Love's car at the Monterey Historic races each year. I do not know with certainty because it has been so long since we attended Monterey. The image above was taken at Sears Point.

_________________________

I believe it was around 1968 that a school chum of mine called excitedly and demanded that I come to his house immediately or I would be quite sorry. It turned out that an uncle was visiting and had driven his 1952 Aston Martin DB2 R. Wow! When I arrived a few minutes later, there it was with everything original. The aircraft seat belt had the huge leather pads to prevent the aluminum buckles from biting you. Nicks and scratches abounded. I do not recall the serial number, but it was a car that Carroll Shelby had driven when he was a factory driver for David Brown. This car also had California license plates.



Please excuse the stock photo of the Aston Martin. I did not even own a camera on the day I saw the DB2 R I mention above.

___________________________________________
post #135 of 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
La Carrera Panamericana is a vintage rally, I recall?

It is a rally today. It is a Phoenix of sorts. The rally began in the 1980s.

However, in its original incarnation, it was an actual race on Mexican highways beginning in 1950 or 1951. Rather than on a closed-circuit race track, the event was held on highway stages. Porsche named its Carrera in honor of their many class wins with the then tiny-engined cars they built.

When Levegh crashed his Mercedes at LeMans in 1955 and killed a goodly number of spectators, the Mexican authorities cancelled the Carrera Panamericana indefinitely. Racing had a black eye for quite some time.
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