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Kitchen Knife Shopping (Washington DC area)

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I am looking for a place to go shopping for a set of kitchen knives in the Washington DC area.

Looking for an 6-8 piece set, in the $300-400 price range.

Some quick online shopping found the brands:
Messermeister Meridian, and Henckels Twin Select can be found in that price range online.

Any suggestions on knive sets and where to find these and other brands in the DC area?
post #2 of 22
Do you need B&M? What's wrong with shopping online? I reccomend not buying a knife set. Spend that money on 2 or 3 nicer knives, you will never use most of the ones in the set, or they will become an excuse to leave dirty ones rusting in the sink. fwiw: I have 2 globals, a santoku and a bread knife. That is all I use.
post #3 of 22
I second the idea of only buying 3-4 knives.
post #4 of 22
I would suggest not getting a set and instead spending the money on a good chefs knife (60%), pairing knife (20 - 25%) and utility knife (15 - 20%). You really don't need much more than that except maybe a bread knife, and those can be had for $15 - 25 (I like Dexter, personally.) The blocks/sets tend to be a waste; you overpay for scissors, a sharpening rod that will ruin your knives, a block that takes up space and a bunch of knives you'll likely never use.
post #5 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by hamish5178 View Post
I reccomend not buying a knife set. Spend that money on 2 or 3 nicer knives, you will never use most of the ones in the set, or they will become an excuse to leave dirty ones rusting in the sink.

fwiw: I have 2 globals, a santoku and a bread knife. That is all I use.

+1 There are other threads on the subject, but most people only use 2-3 knives. Get the best quality you can in these. I have WAY too many knives, but I probably do 90% of my cooking with just two -- a chef's knife and a paring knife.

I do agree that you're probably better off shopping at a brick and mortar, though. A big part of getting a knife you love will be how it fits you personally and since it sounds like you're a bit of a newb, you'll want to experiment with different grips and different blade lengths. FWIW, I've used Globals and really don't like them. It's not that they're bad knives, but the metal handle i find uncomfortable. That's not something you're likely to realize shopping online.
post #6 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by ama View Post
I would suggest not getting a set and instead spending the money on a good chefs knife (60%), pairing knife (20 - 25%) and utility knife (15 - 20%). You really don't need much more than that except maybe a bread knife, and those can be had for $15 - 25 (I like Dexter, personally.) The blocks/sets tend to be a waste; you overpay for scissors, a sharpening rod that will ruin your knives, a block that takes up space and a bunch of knives you'll likely never use.

How does a steel ruin your knives?
post #7 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post
+1 There are other threads on the subject, but most people only use 2-3 knives. Get the best quality you can in these. I have WAY too many knives, but I probably do 90% of my cooking with just two -- a chef's knife and a paring knife.

I do agree that you're probably better off shopping at a brick and mortar, though. A big part of getting a knife you love will be how it fits you personally and since it sounds like you're a bit of a newb, you'll want to experiment with different grips and different blade lengths. FWIW, I've used Globals and really don't like them. It's not that they're bad knives, but the metal handle i find uncomfortable. That's not something you're likely to realize shopping online.

Quick question on the topic. Can you recommend a knife or two maybe ? I just started cooking and I forsee myself doing it for a while @ home given I find it quiet enjoyable. Thanks
post #8 of 22
I recommend going to Williams-Sonoma, Bloomingdale's, and Sur La Table. You can find all three near the Friendship Heights metrorail station.
post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by hamish5178 View Post
How does a steel ruin your knives?

I suppose that I wasn't being entirely clear because I was thinking of my knives. I have Misono UX-10s and a standard steal would in fact dull them, not sharpen them. That being said, steals in general suck. They aren't good for anything but touchups and are pretty hard to use. Water stones are much, much better for sharpening.

Quote:
Originally Posted by G79 View Post
Quick question on the topic. Can you recommend a knife or two maybe ? I just started cooking and I forsee myself doing it for a while @ home given I find it quiet enjoyable. Thanks

How much do you want to spend?
post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by ama View Post
I suppose that I wasn't being entirely clear because I was thinking of my knives. I have Misono UX-10s and a standard steal would in fact dull them, not sharpen them. That being said, steals in general suck. They aren't good for anything but touchups and are pretty hard to use. Water stones are much, much better for sharpening.



Steels aren't meant for sharpening. . .

Are you sure you know what you're talking about?
post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by hamish5178 View Post
Steels aren't meant for sharpening. . .

Are you sure you know what you're talking about?

Yes, are you? Of course they aren't meant for proper sharpening, they are meant to touch up the fine edge of the blade...which is in effect very fine sharpening. Japanese knives are too hard for steal to work on them; they require diamond steal or ceramic. I think you need to stop being so didactic.
post #12 of 22
now boys ... you're both right. "steel" in this case is the name of the tool, not the name of the material from which it's made. for any knife, you need a non-ridged ceramic "steel" to do the best job. my choice for a standard brand of kitchen knife is Wusthoff. I've had my Wusthoff chef's knife for more than 25 years and it's a workhorse. (I also have a misono ux10 and it's a sweet knife, but I'd still go with a Wusthoff for general purpose).
post #13 of 22
I'd start with a paring knife (~$25-$35), a chef's knife ($100-$150) and a utility knife. Get a cheapish bread knife. There isn't much need for a bunch of knives. I like Wusthof Classics, too, especially as a novice. I was given a Shun utility knife recently by my chef brother and it's almost too sharp if you don't have good knife skills yet. I've got many more knicks than I did using Wusthoffs. It is wonderful, though. http://www.amazon.com/Shun-Classic-I...0178424&sr=8-2
post #14 of 22
When I finally broke down and bought some Japanese knives, I stopped using a steel because people told me I would ruin them. It felt really weird not steeling my knives before using them, I guess it was like a nervous habit. Anyway, I broke down and got a ceramic one, and now I feel better and my knives feel super sharp all of the time.
post #15 of 22
I got a ceramic steel for $50. Mac, I think. Works like a charm. Definitely keeps the knives in good order. I have to sharpen the two good knives maybe every three or four months at most.
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