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Fly fishing - Page 15

post #211 of 513
I have a lanyard that I purchased from some ladies on eBay. While they may look a bit ridiculous, they are nice for the minimal/ short outing days.
Hold just the essentials.
Nippers, tippit, floatant, and some flies.
post #212 of 513
Looks like a pretty cool film. Maybe its just the "Inception" score in the background.
post #213 of 513
Thread Starter 

Here's an old school bag for those interested;

 

http://www.goertzenae.com/html/fly_fishing_bag.html

 

 

 

And lanyards that carry a little extra.

 

 

I might use more filson if it wasn't so bloody heavy.

 

lefty

post #214 of 513
That is quite a fancy lanyard. I think those look to be a bit much. I have something like this... but mine has a place for tippet spools.

Edited by mikeman - 1/6/13 at 7:35pm
post #215 of 513
Thread Starter 

This is a pretty good 6-part series on trout fishing. Solid info from a guy that looks a lot like Letterman.

 

 

lefty

post #216 of 513
So what do you recommend I do to learn? Like, I can't really afford guides, my buddy who was teaching me to fly fish probably won't be able to get out too much this year, I could afford a guide like, once. There's a club here but I didn't really like hanging out with them too much (it was huge and they were ALL buddy-buddy so I never like could start talking to people). I have waders.
post #217 of 513
Thread Starter 

What is it you feel you're lacking? Line control? Presentation? Reading water? A lot of this is time on water, so you have to get out there.

 

Is there a stocking program near you? Those fish are usually easily caught and will give you a lot of experience with the hook set and landing fish.

 

Check out the club as they may have beginner fish outs.

 

Join an online forum and look for guys near you that may offer to take you out.

 

Ask at the local fly shop - a lot of them organize trips for novices.

 

lefty

post #218 of 513
All of it shog[1].gifsatisfied.gifredface.gif

There's a really good shop here, I'll pop in and see what they say
post #219 of 513
Thread Starter 

Watch the video I just posted. 

 

lefty

post #220 of 513
Thread Starter 

Always hated the way these things crimp my leaders - maybe this is an answer?

 

 

lefty

post #221 of 513
Quote:
Originally Posted by edinatlanta View Post

So what do you recommend I do to learn? Like, I can't really afford guides, my buddy who was teaching me to fly fish probably won't be able to get out too much this year, I could afford a guide like, once. There's a club here but I didn't really like hanging out with them too much (it was huge and they were ALL buddy-buddy so I never like could start talking to people). I have waders.

Like lefty said, get out on the water and watch video's etc of casting. Casting on lawn is good but is really nothing like being on the water. I must admit I learnt a hell of a lot while out fishing and stop to watch other guys casting that at the time knew a lot more than I did. Biggest two things for me that improved my casting was stopping at 1pm on the back cast (was going way too far back letting the line dip) and pausing more on each cast to let the line curl out straight. Everything else, including mending I've learnt myself. Sometimes it's very frustrating and sometimes it's magic. As long as you are having fun is all that counts.
post #222 of 513
Thread Starter 

Lawn casting is fine, but as CW says has zero to do with casting on water. Every piece of water is different than the last and requires a unique approach. When you approach a new piece of water you have to take the time to A) figure out where the fish are; and B) decide how best to get to them. 

 

If you do want to practice on grass take an old leader and tie a loop at the end. Put a screwdriver through the loop and push the screwdriver into the ground. Pull out 30' or so and step back until there a slight tension on the line and practice roll casting. The tension replicates a water load on the line.  

 


 

Some nice old reels.

 

 

Museum Pieces: The Development of the Fly Reel in the 19th Century


Old Fly Reels
 
The age of this reel is unknown, but it shows basic features we still use today.
 
all photos by American Museum of Fly Fishing in Manchester, Vermont.

 

Modern Choices
Nowadays, fly fishermen have dozens of options of reel styles, many of which feature effective drag systems to help fight fish. Originally, however, the reel was simply a place to hold and dry your silk-gut fly line. Even the click-and-pawl mechanism was originally designed to stop the reel from over-running, not as a true drag meant to put pressure on a fish or protect tippets. Before drag, designers were more fixated on a faster retrieve and created multiplier reels. However, these were mostly so heavy and bulky that they went out of fashion.


 

Old Fly Reels


Unknown Origin
This spike-mount reel is a mysterious design of great age. Possibly Irish in origin, it continued to be made into the 1880s. Instead of the conventional reel foot, there is a spike on the base of the reel that would fit through a hole in the rod butt. The reel is then fastened by a wing nut that threads up the spike until the reel is firmly in place. Whether it was better to mount the reel above or below the rod was the subject of much debate.



Old Fly Reels


Old Fly Reels


The First Travel Reel?
The folding crank style is believed to have originated with the March 20, 1843 patent of James Jones, a London tackle manufacturer. This type of reel had the advantage of being more compact and streamlined when the handle was folded, thus making it easier to transport or store. However, it could also malfunction and fold at inopportune moments, such as when the angler was playing a fish.



Old Fly Reels


Old Fly Reels


The Birdcage
William Billinghurst (1807-1880) was a well known gunsmith from Rochester, New York who won a patent for a side-mount reel built of wire and castings in 1859. This is now considered to be the first American fly reel. He later nickel-plated the reels for sales appeal. The unique appearance of these reels has prompted some to refer to them as “birdcage reels.”



Old Fly Reels


Old Fly Reels


Do-It-Yourself Model
This is a homemade side-mount reel, made of nickel-silver (an alloy of nickel, zinc, and copper) with numerous perforations and attractive floral cutouts. In addition to reducing weight, the ventilation helped air dry the horsehair or silk lines in use at the time. Keeping these lines dry made them cast better and improved their longevity.



Old Fly Reels


Old Fly Reels


Reel as Art
This attractive Birmingham reel, featuring bas relief angling scenes on the plates, was commercially produced in at least two sizes, both as a crank-handle reel and as a revolving plate reel. It appears to be a Victorian-era British product. However, the design was reproduced in Germany during the 1970s, and it is now difficult to differentiate the original reels from the reproductions.



Old Fly Reels


Old Fly Reels


Custom Clamp
An extraordinarily fine New York ball-handle reel. Single-action versions of the reel are not common, but they were better fly reels, since this handle style is less tangle-prone than the offset handle of a multiplier. This was perhaps a custom piece, since the machined construction of the clamp-mount fitting is also unusual and of superior quality.


 

lefty


Edited by lefty - 1/8/13 at 5:57pm
post #223 of 513
Nice set of photos, Lefty.

Never heard of the trick with the screwdriver. wish I'd known of it 30 years ago, I could cast pretty good overhand but never could roll cast worth a dern until I started (recently) spey casting. And it was a chore to learn at my age but a good roll cast is the foundation spey casting.

BTW, Ed Ward talks about making a "grass leader" by tying up a leader with blood knots that are clipped to leave 1/2" or so of protruding tags on each knot. This is supposed to replicate water tension as well.

But truth to tell, especially for sustained anchor casting it is near-as-nevermind worthless at replicating water tension...might be better for touch and go, I don't know.

Water casting is always the best way to practice esp. for spey casting where water tension is what loads the rod.
post #224 of 513
As others have said, practice, practice, practice. Also, if you have a Orvis store in the area, you may want to check with them. I took a FREE class from them, which went over basic casting, and to be honest, it was really helpful. Its called something like "Fly Fishing 101", and then they also have a 201 where they take you on the water (okay, a pond). Regardless, its worth checking out.

I also took a free fly tying class there which went over basics.
post #225 of 513
Thread Starter 

Grass casting is worth it only if you can't get to water. 

 

I learned the basics on casting ponds and was reasonably okay. Then I got to a river and found myself faced with 20 different casting problems that made all my practice pretty much useless. The easiest cast is a downriver load and a plop upriver. Mend once and you should get a good enough drift to fool a fish. That cast (mastered across both sides of the body) is used more than any other.

 

lefty

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