or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Fly fishing
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Fly fishing - Page 14

post #196 of 502
I tend to take a bit of time out before I hit the water to see what's around. If not much is showing on the streams rustle a few bushes and this often gets a few of the duns that are about to turn in to spinners to come out. From then I pick something as close as possible. If in doubt I just use a generalist dry in summer, the good old Royal Wulff always works well for this in various sizes along with stimulator patterns. Nymphs are a lot easier I find, well here in Australia anyway the fish dont seem to be too fussy on colour, more size and having it weighted properly to get at the right level.

I've not used a guide but me and my wife (and baby by then) are planning our wedding anniversary next October in Tasmania, the best trout fishing in the country and as I'll only have 1 day's fishing, I will look at getting a guide for at least half a day to show me around.
post #197 of 502
Thread Starter 

A good fly shop is your best friend. Walk in with your fly box and ask what they recommend. Drop $25 or so on flies for their advice.

 

Find a local group or a FF forum and read. Then hit the water and observe and experiment. If fish are breaking the surface they're eating something - what's flying around you? What's floating by?

 

A good guide for 1/2 day can be invaluable.

 

lefty

post #198 of 502
Depending on where you're located and what you're fishing for a guide can really help. I'm a great believer in leveraging your skill by studying with a master any time you can.

For instance, if you're in the Pacific NW in March the fly shop in Sandy Oregon has a whole day guided trip for steelhead (fresh chrome) on the Sandy and maybe even the Clackamas for $250.00. I'm very very tempted even though I've been fly fishing for steelhead close on to 40 years and Oregon is where I live. In fact, I live on one of the great steelhead rivers--the Deschutes.

But fishing for steelhead for 40 years is not the same a living for and with them 24/7--that's what you get with a guide.
post #199 of 502
Thread Starter 

That's a hell of a deal. Most PNW steelhead guides start at $450/dy.

 

lefty

post #200 of 502
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

That's a hell of a deal. Most PNW steelhead guides start at $450/dy.

lefty

You're right. Check it out...http://www.flyfishusa.com/adventure-trips/winter-steelhead-schools/winter-steelhead-schools.htm

And right at the height of the season/run too.
post #201 of 502
You guys are lucky over there the guiding is a lot cheaper and accessible. Here a guide is generally around $800-$1000 for a full day and most of them still do it tough, mainly because there just isn't the population of anglers for them to be working say 200 days a year in the open season. Most of them need alternative income to survive, many have online/B&M stores selling fly fishing stuff to supplement there wages.
post #202 of 502
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlie's Wardrobe View Post

You guys are lucky over there the guiding is a lot cheaper and accessible. Here a guide is generally around $800-$1000 for a full day and most of them still do it tough, mainly because there just isn't the population of anglers for them to be working say 200 days a year in the open season. Most of them need alternative income to survive, many have online/B&M stores selling fly fishing stuff to supplement there wages.

Yes, and over here most of our rivers are accessible to the public. In Oregon, any "navigable" stream is open to the high water mark even if private property runs right up to the river bank.

Canberra...are your rivers divided up into "beats" that are strictly private as in much of England, Ireland and Scotland? I assume that in such places part of the guiding fee is the "rental"/lease of these beats. Not cheap by any means.
post #203 of 502
Thread Starter 

$1K for a day of fishing without accommodation is insane. You can easily get into 1-2K per day at a lodge, but in some cases that includes bush planes or helicopters into the back country. Luckily, here in the NE guides are less than 300/dy and as DW pointed out there is a lot of public water.

 

CW, is NZ as expensive?

 

lefty

post #204 of 502
All of our water is public as well, same as you as long as you don't go over the high water mark and access it from public land like a bridge or seek permission from the owners (usually farmers here in Australia).

The high cost is mainly just economies of scale, our population is very minor compared to the US so not as many fly fisherman in general and even less willing to pay for guides, so the prices reflect it. Often it includes accommodation for multi day trips but these are usually basic huts and not lodges.

NZ is about the same price as a trip to Tasmania usually and we don't need a visa to visit, and being a 3 hour flight it makes it very accessible.
post #205 of 502
This is completely random, but since this is a "style" forum I thought it was mildly relevant.

Anyhow, I have noticed that style wise, that there are three types of fly fishers.

1) Classic- vest, fishing shirt, creel (kind joking there), But I think you get the picture
2) Sportsman- The guys who head to the river in all camouflage.
3)New age- The guys who like all the cool technical gear (think patagonia and simms)

Do you guys tend to agree? I personally fit in the "new age" category.
Edited by mikeman - 1/5/13 at 10:27pm
post #206 of 502
Thread Starter 

A lot of this depends on where and how you fish. You can fish easy and slow rivers in pretty much anything - I met a guy in plus fours once - but if I'm hiking in and the water's rough I use technical gear. Or a mix. My hat is a beat up fedora and my wading staff is an old broom handle, but I use a Fishpond chest pack, Simms waders, and decent Orvis boots.

 

Sometimes it is nice to just pick up a rod, some tippet and a couple of flies, and just go fishing.

 

lefty

post #207 of 502
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post


Sometimes it is nice to just pick up a rod, some tippet and a couple of flies, and just go fishing.

lefty

Totally Agree. I generally end up bringing my waist pack with everywhere though, as I'm diabetic and have to carry some supplies...
post #208 of 502
I have an Orvis sling pack (which rides between my shoulder blade or maybe a little lower) but if I could figure out some way to leave water and energy bar and flybox and raincoat behind, I'd do away with even that.

I have and use good equipment...boots waders,etc....but when you're spey casting you don't want much of anything out in front of you (on the chest or abdomen) because it impedes the action of the bottom hand in the forward casting stroke. That's why a lot of folks have gone to lanyards that have tippet spools and nippers and floatant (and often brightly coloured beads) attached.

No offense to anyone who likes them, but, personally, I just can't come to terms with wearing a necklace and I don't like the idea of all that clatter and stuff around my neck.
post #209 of 502
Thread Starter 

I think one of the harder things to do is pare down on the water. I tend to bring to much stuff.

 

Also not a fan of the lanyard. I do like like the chest pack as I can drop the neck strap and wear it as a waist pack.

 

lefty

post #210 of 502
Yeah I've just got a chest pack too and prefer it a lot more than my vest. FWIW i'm more of a technical guy too. My trout fishing tends to be done in either freezing cold or boiling hot and I try to dress to be as comfortable as possible.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Fly fishing