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Fly fishing - Page 2

post #16 of 452
Quote:
Originally Posted by romafan View Post
practice a couple of basic knots (clinch, blood, surgeons loop, etc.) and read one of the many primers available (recommend curtis creekk manifesto). casting is semi-intuitive, but it's easy to pick up bad habits/form that can be tough to break.

Curtis Creek is a great book. It's the one my dad used to teach me. And bad habits aren't bad if they get the line where it needs to go (and you don't spook the fish). My roll cast is nowhere near textbook, but for the little creeks my dad and I tend to fish, it gets the fly where I want it.

Also, before you run out and buy ten million flies, get a few basics. Elk hair caddis, Royal Wulff, Perhaps a Goddard caddis, Perhaps a PMX or two. For the wet flies, a few midges, couple of nymphs and a Wooly Bugger or two to round out the wet fly lineup. Add a few more flies that seem to work in the area (based on the recommendation of your local fly shop guy) and you're good to go. Matching flies to the hatch is often a waste of time, you'll usually do well with a few good generalists presented correctly.
post #17 of 452
http://www.sexyloops.com/ Followed this blog/site for a while, quite funny. http://www.sexyloops.com/flycasting/index.shtml
post #18 of 452
Fly fishing is so much fun. So serene punctuated by intense excitement when that fish rises to snap up that fly.

It's also a great hobby to enjoy with your partner, because my experience (and through talking to others) is that women are very good at learning how to fly fish.

I know this has been discussed, but I can not emphasize enough the utilization of a guide while you learn the techniques, just so you do not establish bad ones. When I was learning, I'd go up into the high country in Colorado and fish for brook trout - they are plentiful and will bite at anything.

And yes, you need to practice at home, over and over again, the different knots so it can be more intuitive when you are in the middle of a stream or river.

Don't skimp on waders. Chest waders are much more adaptable and you need ones that resist puncture from thorns and brush along the water.
post #19 of 452
Thread Starter 
Quote:
The Golden Gate Angling and Casting Club will present the Jimmy Green Spey-O-Rama,The World Championship of Spey Casting April 15th, 16th, and 17th, 2011 at the world-renowned casting ponds located in Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. GGACC is devoted to introducing everyone to fly casting and angling at their historical club and facility. The event is open to the public and admittance is free.

http://www.spey-o-rama.com/


lefty
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post #20 of 452
post #21 of 452
Thread Starter 


lefty
post #22 of 452
Since we're pulling out books:



Learned all I needed about flies from this book. It first belonged to my father who bought it as a teen.
post #23 of 452
This is all you need to know...
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post #24 of 452
Quote:
Originally Posted by robin View Post
Since we're pulling out books:

[IMG]http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd102/raschenck/fly_tying_book_2.jpg[/IMG

Learned all I needed about flies from this book. It first belonged to my father who bought it as a teen.

Who needs a book? Just learn to tie an elk hair caddis and one or two other dry flies. If you need something wet, it's easy enough to get the elk hair to work as such, since that's what it was originally supposed to be. Or tie a variation with peacock herl instead of standard hackle. It'll break the surface but still float, but getting it below the surface tension will make it more visible to fish thanks to how some of the optic distortion works.

'Course, I'm one of those "5 flies and lots of 'em" types. If you want to have one of everything, go right ahead. A book would help for that.
post #25 of 452
Thread Starter 
Just a reminder about this for San Fran folk. I went today and saw some of the best casters in the world.

http://www.spey-o-rama.com/

The Golden Gate Angling and Casting Club will present the Jimmy Green Spey-O-Rama,The World Championship of Spey Casting April 15th, 16th, and 17th, 2011 at the world-renowned casting ponds located in Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. GGACC is devoted to introducing everyone to fly casting and angling at their historical club and facility. The event is open to the public and admittance is free.

lefty
post #26 of 452
Quote:
Originally Posted by robin View Post
Since we're pulling out books: .
I've been trying to get hold of Fly Fishing by J R Hartley, I tried Yellow Pages but no luck so far.
post #27 of 452
While we are on the subject don't forget there's a different dimension to fly fishing called warm water. Think bass, other sunfish, catfish, etc. Thanks guys, now I'm thinking about taking out a rod, tying a few flies and going fishin'. Life is good.
post #28 of 452
So the Atlanta fly fishing club had a meeting last wednesday and has a trip to NC for mid-may. I'll either go on that or one to Florida later in the year for my first fly fishing trip.
post #29 of 452
Thread Starter 

Anyone fish Tenkara?

 

Tenkara is the Japanese method of fly-fishing that uses only a rod, line and fly. It's ideal for fly-fishing for trout in mountain stream. Originally practiced by professional fishermen, tenkara is a simpler and very effective method of fly-fishing.

 

 

lefty

post #30 of 452
I pretty much only fish small streams like that (or smaller), and while I often use a pretty fixed length of line and a lot of those techniques, I don't see any need to limit myself in that manner. While I'm sure I'd manage okay, adjusting length is helpful.
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