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Caviar - Page 2

post #16 of 28
[quote=LabelKing]
Quote:
Originally Posted by pejsek

I suppose the memories of Westerns visitors to the 1970s Soviet Untion are not to be trusted for accuracy of local customs.

However, stores such as A La Vieille Russie made their fortune on cheaply bought Faberge, etc. from the Soviets.

Ha Ha. Nice try. These aren't memories and I'm not quite old enough for the seventies (unless you want to count jr. high). Look it up in any statistical abstract. Or, go ahead, live the dream of La Vielle Russie. Heck, even throw in the Russian Tea Room, if you like.
Have you by any chance read Francine du Plessix Gray's book about her parents, Alexander Liberman and Tatiana Yakovleva? Many good illustrations of the Western willingness to embrace the most fantastical notions of Russia.
post #17 of 28
[quote=pejsek]
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing

Ha Ha. Nice try. These aren't memories and I'm not quite old enough for the seventies (unless you want to count jr. high). Look it up in any statistical abstract. Or, go ahead, live the dream of La Vielle Russie. Heck, even throw in the Russian Tea Room, if you like.
Have you by any chance read Francine du Plessix Gray's book about her parents, Alexander Liberman and Tatiana Yakovleva? Many good illustrations of the Western willingness to embrace the most fantastical notions of Russia.
No, I meant that my recounting of the commonality of caviar was based on Western visitors in the '70s. They were apparently served it everywhere; from the dreary dining halls to the drearier formerly grand hotels.

And La Vielle Russie's fortunes were entirely made on the export of Faberge from the old Soviet Union.
post #18 of 28
We have this little Russian store that sells different grades of red caviar in bulk. I much prefer red caviar to anything else. I have a small circle of Russian friends, and they too seem to favor red caviar.
post #19 of 28
Best caviar: Almas

Other fish roe that are much better value: flying fish roe (try it in any sea food soup); sea urchin (an acquired taste).
post #20 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aus_MD
flying fish roe (try it in any sea food soup)
Do you just sprinkle a bit on top immediately before serving?
post #21 of 28
[quote=LabelKing]No, I meant that my recounting of the commonality of caviar was based on Western visitors in the '70s. They were apparently served it everywhere; from the dreary dining halls to the drearier formerly grand hotels.

Yes, I'm sorry. I did misunderstand. You are quite right. Caviar was one of the top weapons in the standard-of-living arsenal. Visitors with hard currency were indeed served it everywhere and all the time. Like bread. Part of the reason was to give this impression of plenty. Okay, we don't have toilet paper, but we do have all the caviar you can stomach. We are a rich country. Of course, at some point you do become willing to trade caviar for toilet paper.
The grand hotels were dreary, but isn't there also something really attractive about a certain level of decay (otherwise you are living in Switzerland)? I recall staying in one of the old dowager hotels in Leningrad. The rooms were all suites with crystal chandeliers and pre-revolutionary pianos and furniture. Everything was slowly falling apart and being repaired ineptly. Cockroaches danced around the caviar. It was quite luxurious in its way. Havana may be similar.
post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by pejsek
Yes, I'm sorry. I did misunderstand. You are quite right. Caviar was one of the top weapons in the standard-of-living arsenal. Visitors with hard currency were indeed served it everywhere and all the time. Like bread. Part of the reason was to give this impression of plenty. Okay, we don't have toilet paper, but we do have all the caviar you can stomach. We are a rich country. Of course, at some point you do become willing to trade caviar for toilet paper.
The grand hotels were dreary, but isn't there also something really attractive about a certain level of decay (otherwise you are living in Switzerland)? I recall staying in one of the old dowager hotels in Leningrad. The rooms were all suites with crystal chandeliers and pre-revolutionary pianos and furniture. Everything was slowly falling apart and being repaired ineptly. Cockroaches danced around the caviar. It was quite luxurious in its way. Havana may be similar.

The decrepitude was/is also present in Shanghai where there are a large amount of old buildings, and formerly grand structures with incomptent "repairs" and large amounts of shellac applied to the woodwork so as to make it appear new.



post #23 of 28
I like almas too (which literally means diamonds) I always eat it when I am in Iran although it doesnt make much difference price wise. I like persian caviar better than Russian. It taste better and stronger. xerxes
post #24 of 28
Thread Starter 
That is true, but I rather enjoy the "malossol" instead of iranian.
More butterly flavor on the russian.
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aristocrat
That is true, but I rather enjoy the "malossol" instead of iranian.
More butterly flavor on the russian.

IMO, the best tasting caviar is Malossol Osetra from Caspian sea. The only place on earth where this fish lives. Perhaps thought of this rare fish being slowly hunted to extinction adds to the excitement of devouring thousands of it's offspring in one sitting.
Some suppliers cultivated superiority of Beluga for a long time due to economic factors (cost of extracting caviar, weight of species, etc.)
I find Osetra caviar the smallest and with a nicest purl-grey hue. Also it has the strongest (not fishy) taste.
Beluga is too tame for my taste buds.
Sevruga is my least favorite caviar, as it is the fishiest in taste, thus the cheapest one.

Black Osetra Caviar is best consumed with buttered French baguette.
Proper drinks would be cold vodka or light beer, but never Champagne.

Currently there is ban on Osetra hunting in Russia, so buying Russian caviar right now is not advisable, as 100% of it is poached and not properly prepared.
post #26 of 28
question: does caviar taste fishy? I hate fish, or anything with a fishy taste, which is the main thing that has kept me from trying caviar.
post #27 of 28
Quite fishy. I honestly do not think you will like it.
post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek
question: does caviar taste fishy? I hate fish, or anything with a fishy taste, which is the main thing that has kept me from trying caviar.

I don't eat fresh water fish at all. I also dislike fish oil smell or taste and yet I LOVE Black caviar.
I suggest you should try it at least once. Make sure it is Osetra or Beluga caviar. Those two types are not fishy at all to my taste.
Quite honestly I like Smoked or grilled Osetra meet. It does not taste fishy, well the Osetra does not look like a fish after all It looks like a spiky prehistoric panzer-fish.
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