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shoe construction...behind the veil - Page 93

post #1381 of 1401
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sleepyinsanfran View Post

I have a question regarding the piping on the edges of the uppers (i.e. as opposed to a cut-edge or a folded edge), especially as used on some oxfords: Is satin/silk piping meant to be more luxurious than leather piping? And how durable might that be?

I guess that depends on your POV. I suspect it's not near as durable as leather, however. And not to put too fine a point on it, IMO, a folded edge, where applicable, is far more elegant, refined (and difficult) than any bead.
post #1382 of 1401

thank you! that's good to know!

post #1383 of 1401
Cloth as beading is quite bulky and can't be skived like leather, so it's sort of opposite to the idea of luxury. The only time I'd ever put fabric edging on a shoe is if the upper is fabric, like a petersham grain roll bound edge on velvet slipper where a raw edge might fray. Other than that, kidskin beading on pretty much everything but the lightest of ladies work.
post #1384 of 1401

Very informative post. Thank you so much for sharing.

post #1385 of 1401
Quote:
Originally Posted by ntempleman View Post

The only time I'd ever put fabric edging on a shoe is if the upper is fabric, like a petersham grain roll bound edge on velvet slipper where a raw edge might fray. Other than that, kidskin beading on pretty much everything but the lightest of ladies work.

Here is an illustration of various edge treatments:


edgetreatment.jpg

Grosgrain/Petersham ribbon gets sometimes used as 'French binding' on evening shoes, as the texture picks up the texture on other parts of the formal outfit (lapel facings, ribbon down the trouser legs.)
post #1386 of 1401
On an evening slipper for sure, not on an Oxford as sleepyinsanfran mentioned though, evening use or otherwise.
post #1387 of 1401
Quote:
Originally Posted by ntempleman View Post

On an evening slipper for sure, not on an Oxford as sleepyinsanfran mentioned though, evening use or otherwise.

I have seen it (occasionally) on 'black tie' oxfords and I quite like it, as the matte, ribbed texture gives a nice contrast to the high-shine patent- or smooth leather. If I ever were to commission a pair of evening shoes (highly unlikely,as I don't have a dinner jacket right now and I feel no urge to get one) that's probably something I would choose.

chacun à son goût
post #1388 of 1401
https://www.instagram.com/p/BDfsbPATFku/

How do you think the waist is attached in this type of hybrid construction?
post #1389 of 1401
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beargonefishing View Post

https://www.instagram.com/p/BDfsbPATFku/

How do you think the waist is attached in this type of hybrid construction?

Without seeing the waist or better, the shoe, it is hard to know. But I suspect in the usual fashion--sewn in a closed channel.
post #1390 of 1401
You could sew a couple of bits of welt on the waist, then turn out the forepart Norwegian style. Or possibly stitch the waist section as a pump sole, but that's probably unlikely. You could even peg it if you wanted to.
post #1391 of 1401
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ntempleman View Post

You could sew a couple of bits of welt on the waist, then turn out the forepart Norwegian style. Or possibly stitch the waist section as a pump sole, but that's probably unlikely. You could even peg it if you wanted to.

+1 That's a much better answer than mine...I was still in "channel stitching mode" from another thread.
post #1392 of 1401
Quote:
Originally Posted by ntempleman View Post

You could sew a couple of bits of welt on the waist, then turn out the forepart Norwegian style. Or possibly stitch the waist section as a pump sole, but that's probably unlikely. You could even peg it if you wanted to.

Does St Crispin's peg their beveled waists? Is it difficult mix construction methods on a shoe/boot?
post #1393 of 1401
I don't know anything about St Crispins, but I wouldn't have thought so.

It's all "difficult", the quality of your results depends on your skill level and how much you've practiced a particular method or combination of methods.
post #1394 of 1401
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beargonefishing View Post

Does St Crispin's peg their beveled waists? Is it difficult mix construction methods on a shoe/boot?

Actually I think they do.

And as @ntempleman said, quality depends on skill level. Personally, I think pegs ought to be driven at roughly 10 PPI, in a double row. I see a lot of pg work that is widely spaced and only a single row. I'm not convinced that's reliable--more ornamental than effective and relying on the cement to hold everything together. .
post #1395 of 1401
Quote:
Originally Posted by beargonefishing View Post

Does St Crispin's peg their beveled waists?

Watch the video "Saint Crispin's - the whole process" here.
From 9:12 minutes on, you'll see the waist being pegged:

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