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how to become an executive? - Page 2

post #16 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by captoe View Post
i actually thought everyone becomes an executive. like everyone that stays long enough in a bank becomes VP. probably not a logical argument there though.
Bank VP =! Executive. There are lots of bank VP's that don't manage anyone. Banks give out VP titles so that their line officers can actually sign contracts that commit the corporation. They do so many transactions every day that if the real executives had to sign every contract, they'd never do anything else. Answer is that you need to be good at getting work done through others; organizing, delegating, following up, strategizing, selling and motivating. Lots of people think that because they are good at their jobs, they'll be good at their boss's job. Being good at one's job is not the same as being a good manager. You also have to have a lot of luck. You also have to convince someone to give you the opportunity to be a manager.
post #17 of 48
Deliver results.
post #18 of 48
It depends entirely on where you work and who is already at the top. Seriously. In my company, there's a district director who is, I think, about 12, but she's really nice. Go figure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post
You'll need some really classy business cards.


Ah, pushy business card man, how I've missed thee.
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post #19 of 48
Having a creative personality , those who can develope anything from scratch , the contrary to the memorist personality that only can get high notes but can´t create nothing from their own.



Just be like me.
post #20 of 48
You too can become an executive. Just follow these simple and easy to understand step by step directions.

http://www.ehow.com/how_2169047_beco...-director.html
post #21 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fwiffo View Post
To oman: Before you commit to any course of action, why do you want to become an executive? What makes you admire the people you mentioned?

I'm researching possible careers

ultimately i want to become an entrepreneur, so i've kinda been doing this mentoring thing with the founder/ceo of a smallish tech consultancy (on mercer st actually, near some of those restaurants you frequent). it's interesting and i'm learning some stuff about the day-to-day life of an entrepreneur, but this guy has some pretty big clients, and so he is good friends with a lot of the executives from those giant firms, and there's definitely some personality overlap

basically i'm trying to find out what the job description for an executive position is. these guys all seem to have large amounts of innate talent - intelligence, perception, work ethic - but there are a lot of people who have those things in larger amounts, and aren't considered capable of filling executive roles.

to answer your question, i'm trying to figure out what specific qualities make certain people more capable of running a company, so that i can cultivate these qualities in myself
post #22 of 48
Personally, I think your desire to aggressively manage your career already gives you a bit of an advantage. You'd be surprised at the number of people that whine and complain about their job, but never make an effort to excel at what they do or make their situation better. I'd suggest giving whatever job you attain your best effort and, if the company is not rewarding you, move onto one that will.
post #23 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by oman View Post
basically i'm trying to find out what the job description for an executive position is. these guys all seem to have large amounts of innate talent - intelligence, perception, work ethic - but there are a lot of people who have those things in larger amounts, and aren't considered capable of filling executive roles.

That happens at more than the exec level. It amazes me how many people get promoted when there are obviously better people available.
post #24 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by oman View Post
to answer your question, i'm trying to figure out what specific qualities make certain people more capable of running a company, so that i can cultivate these qualities in myself

Although there are many paths from sleeping your way to the top, having the executive team's jet go down and you being the sole survivor, here are my humble two cents (in no particular order):

1. Network. All power in an organization rests with individuals; your peers, your boss, your boss' boss, etc. Most of your colleagues are divided into two camps - those who want to get ahead and those who are in support and happy at their level (HR, Finance, IT, etc.). Having the political acumen to get all their disparately motivated intentions on your side will impress the hell out of your boss and show that you can do his or her job. Politics = collaboration. The more relationships you have, the more trust you build, the less resistance you'll have when you need their support. Even if you have a plan that proves numerically and logically it'll save the entire company, half the company will fight you because you lack a relationship with them. Persuasion is more than just showing the facts. Success at the executive level is about relationships *and* results. Doing just the latter won't open that final door.

2. Over-delegate. Those that make it to the executive rank typically delegate like crazy - anything and everything that comes across their desk. People get mired in middle management because they still do actual "work"; i.e. you're putting in GL entries or reconciling when you're a Finance manager. Delegation develops staff.

3. Hire well. People who tend to get promoted up and above middle management are the ones who exhibit the ability to hire great people. Other peer managers will be raving "God that guy has some great people on his team" or "Where does he find these people?!"

4. Coach well. Invest in your people. Develop a relationship with them. You give opportunities for your folks to shine. They get promoted. You care about them and won't throw them under a bus. A great coaching leader is somewhat like a good sergeant, he takes care of them compensation wise, has a great relationship with his directs (down to each direct's children's names) and knows their personality and character and what motivates them. If you talk to a successful executive's directs, they'll probably say, "Man is it tough to work for XYZ but it's so worth it in the end." You want to cultivate a situation where your team will sacrifice and do things for the sarge so they'll keep charging up hills for you.

5. Be a part of whatever raison d'etre your company does. All great managers can have stellar results but your results will be known if you're part of the company that makes money or saves money. Makes money is better. So if you're in a company that sells toilet paper, you *have* to get yourself into that chain, preferably sales, if not then at least making the toilet paper, because sitting in HR talking about how you kept retention at the company close to 100% matters less to the powers that promote people compared to if you increased top or bottom line for them.
post #25 of 48
Many executives are fucking idiots. They only got that position because of family ties, or a friend pulled strings to get them an executive position.
post #26 of 48
hone your mediocrity until it becomes a sharp razor slicing your soul. only then will you be ready.
post #27 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by fwiffo View Post
Although there are many paths from sleeping your way to the top, having the executive team's jet go down and you being the sole survivor, here are my humble two cents (in no particular order):

1. Network. All power in an organization rests with individuals; your peers, your boss, your boss' boss, etc. Most of your colleagues are divided into two camps - those who want to get ahead and those who are in support and happy at their level (HR, Finance, IT, etc.). Having the political acumen to get all their disparately motivated intentions on your side will impress the hell out of your boss and show that you can do his or her job. Politics = collaboration. The more relationships you have, the more trust you build, the less resistance you'll have when you need their support. Even if you have a plan that proves numerically and logically it'll save the entire company, half the company will fight you because you lack a relationship with them. Persuasion is more than just showing the facts. Success at the executive level is about relationships *and* results. Doing just the latter won't open that final door.

2. Over-delegate. Those that make it to the executive rank typically delegate like crazy - anything and everything that comes across their desk. People get mired in middle management because they still do actual "work"; i.e. you're putting in GL entries or reconciling when you're a Finance manager. Delegation develops staff.

3. Hire well. People who tend to get promoted up and above middle management are the ones who exhibit the ability to hire great people. Other peer managers will be raving "God that guy has some great people on his team" or "Where does he find these people?!"

4. Coach well. Invest in your people. Develop a relationship with them. You give opportunities for your folks to shine. They get promoted. You care about them and won't throw them under a bus. A great coaching leader is somewhat like a good sergeant, he takes care of them compensation wise, has a great relationship with his directs (down to each direct's children's names) and knows their personality and character and what motivates them. If you talk to a successful executive's directs, they'll probably say, "Man is it tough to work for XYZ but it's so worth it in the end." You want to cultivate a situation where your team will sacrifice and do things for the sarge so they'll keep charging up hills for you.

5. Be a part of whatever raison d'etre your company does. All great managers can have stellar results but your results will be known if you're part of the company that makes money or saves money. Makes money is better. So if you're in a company that sells toilet paper, you *have* to get yourself into that chain, preferably sales, if not then at least making the toilet paper, because sitting in HR talking about how you kept retention at the company close to 100% matters less to the powers that promote people compared to if you increased top or bottom line for them.

Great post. OP, I suggest you print this out and keep it in your wallet.
post #28 of 48
Thread Starter 
yeah i agree, that seems to be really good advice
post #29 of 48
Get your education. . .Start a company. . .work smart. . .work hard.
post #30 of 48
Great post, fwiffo.
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