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Most Abused Words - Page 7

post #91 of 351
The N Word.
Well mostly by blacks, i don't get it...if they don't want to be called "N word(s)" why do they call themselves "N word(s)". Chinese don't call themselves "coolies", Middle Easterners don't call themselves "camel jockeys" so why do Blacks call themselves the "N word(s)" if they hate it so much?

It's like constantly shooting yourself in the foot yet when another race calls them that they say its a hate filled word and thus a racial crime but they keep committing that crime AGAINST THEMSELVES???
post #92 of 351
"From whence"
post #93 of 351
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwiteaboy View Post
"From whence"

I cannot imagine that this phrase is really abused in your daily life.
post #94 of 351
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpooPoker View Post
I cannot imagine that this phrase is really abused in your daily life.

With an error this egregious, even once is bad enough.
post #95 of 351
"Epic" and "tragic."
post #96 of 351
It's probably been said already, so if it has this would be another agreement toward it's hate. I completely hate the two words 'epic' and 'fail' and when they are also put together.

Now, I don't know if this is *exactly* true, but I know before I started playing World of Warcraft NOBODY IN ANY POP CULTURE CIRCLE was saying 'epic' at the same frequency it is heard now. I played that game for a long time, and if anyone else has, you will know an Epic is what becomes the standard level of equipment at end-game level. It was used in the context of 'lets get some epics', and/or when you get them, 'wooooo, epics! check out my epics!' (eloquent, I know =) I played WoW for some time (4 years) and about a year after I quit (2008), I started hearing it all over the fucking place. In TV shows, on the radio, in conversation with other people. 'Fail' as it's own meta-word began (again in my experience) around the same time.

But now you just hear it all the time. Instead of 'man, that was epic' I'd rather hear something like 'man, that was crazy/awesome/whatever', just not 'EPIC!!' And I'd much rather hear 'man, you failed...' rather than just 'FAIL!!!'

So stupid. So annoying.
post #97 of 351
Quote:
Originally Posted by imatlas View Post
"Whilst" and "amongst". They were obscure, even obsolete words until a few years ago, and suddenly they're everywhere.

Heh, I'm the only person I know who says 'whilst'. It's not an everyday thing, but I say it occasionally to try to sound funny (notice I say 'try'; it doesn't work).
post #98 of 351
Quote:
Originally Posted by MiddleClassDude View Post
Heh, I'm the only person I know who says 'whilst'. It's not an everyday thing, but I say it occasionally to try to sound funny (notice I say 'try'; it doesn't work).
Were I to utilize it in one of my conversations, it's most likely to go unnoticed.
post #99 of 351
Very
post #100 of 351
aks
post #101 of 351
^^ is that "ask" but pronounced "axe" If thats what you meant then I agree x1000 thats so fucking annoying
post #102 of 351
I caught myself using "kinda" a few times this weekend.

I usually hate when people use that word.
post #103 of 351
"Bellwether" in its common contemporary usage.

Properly, a bellwether is a castrated ram that wears a bell for the other sheep to follow--hence, the leader of a mindless herd. For example, "Sarah Palin is a bellwether of the tea party conservatives."

However, by similarities with the word "weathervane" (and because most educated people today don't know WTF a "wether" is) the word has been subverted into a meaning like "predictor" or "trend setter": "The recent GOP victories in local elections are bellwethers of a Republican landslide in November."

Another one I just hate is "kudo," as in, "He deserves a kudo for his good work." This is an ignorant back formation from the Greek "kudos," which is singular to begin with and has no plural. Unfortunately, "kudo" has been sanctioned by certain descriptivist lexicographers, damn them!
post #104 of 351
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpooPoker View Post
I cannot imagine that this phrase is really abused in your daily life.

My mother often uses the phrase, "Take it from whence it comes."
post #105 of 351
^she's talking about sechs
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