Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › F*** menswearhouse
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

F*** menswearhouse - Page 4

post #46 of 70
Schmiddy, that's all true, but as you say and as we freely admit, this is an obsession.
post #47 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schmiddy
I've been lurking here for several months, so I don't know why I felt the need to make this my first post. But...
I've learned a lot from this forum. My eye for quality clothing has improved dramatically, I've learned how to choose clothes that I like and find fair deals on them. I have also invested many hours of time to reading books and this forum, and many more in shopping for clothes that I want.
For those without the time or the finances to to what I did, Men's Warehouse is a very nice solution. It served me well for many years before becoming interested in finer clothing. While nothing there is excellent, a lot of it is acceptable; especially if you're just trying to look professional and aren't aspiring to be a fashion icon. Their sales people are helpful and understand the basics of coordination. My years of wearing Men's Wearhouse clothes never won me any awards, but I never looked like a slob (i.e. like many of my coworkers). I never bought anything overly fashion-y that hasn't stood the test of time.
I recently spent a week in Prague with an Englishman, a Frenchman, and an Italian- all very nice dressers. After wearing my finest, the only outfit that I wore that garnered compliments? 6-year-old blue Claiborne suit from MWH, white Brooks Brothers no-iron shirt, Altea tie, Cole Haan shoes. Junk clothes by anyone's definition but they fit me well, were well coordinated, and were well cared for.
Now that I know better, I'm happier with my Barbera suits and Borrelli shirts than the stuff I got at MWH. But there are a lot worse options out there for those who don't plan to make clothing their hobby/obsession.
I know I've got it coming... let the flames begin.
I salute your courage.
post #48 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by josepidal
I salute your courage.

Can one wear Cole Haans to law school parties?
post #49 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by metaphysician
Can one wear Cole Haans to law school parties?

All depends on if they are worn as part of the same ensemble as a pocket square.
post #50 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by metaphysician
Can one wear Cole Haans to law school parties?

Sure, as long as they're black.
post #51 of 70
Excellent post Schmiddy, sometimes on this board people loose touch with the reality of day-to-day living and dress for a huge portion of the population.

a.
post #52 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aaron
Excellent post Schmiddy, sometimes on this board people loose touch with the reality of day-to-day living and dress for a huge portion of the population.

a.

Nonsense. Why just the other day, I ventured amongst the proletariat on the subway wearing nought but Ralph Lauren Blue Label, mere Loakebrogues, and a tie whose dimple was slighty left of center. I feel like a true man of the people, indistinguishable from the great and smelly masses...truely in touch, mon ami, and quite well integrated.
post #53 of 70
Schmiddy, how did you come to conclude that one's refusal to wear rubbish constitutes an obsession ?
post #54 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by metaphysician
Can one wear Cole Haans to law school parties?
I'm afraid it would be too cold.
post #55 of 70
My first 3 suits I bought within two days of one another just last December for a job I got that required business dress. All suits looked the same, I had only cared about the pattern, not the cut or anything else.

The first 2 I got from a tailor, supposedly made from the same fabric as Hugo Boss according to the tailor. Then I went to buy a MWH suit from my cousin who got me only a 15% discount even though he said he could get me 30%. I actually like the MWH Claiborne suit the most out of all of em because the shoulders fit the best, even though it has no vents. It's just a basic navy pinstripe, but I will actually keep this one around for rainy days.

Thing that really really pissed me off about the MWH is they make you pay for alterations. And the tailors are second rate. They do tailoring "while you wait" the ladies back there are rushing so fast they can't get anything right. After having them mess with it three times I ended up paying again to have my tailor alter it properly.

Their dress shirts are a different story, all pointed collars and made for fat people like at my previous job. The salesmen do pounce on you too and they are trying to push the mock turtleneck for business casual. Seriously, thinking about them walking around in their mock turtlenecks makes me nauseous. At least they have women working their for shirt and tie combo suggestions. I doubt any man who works there could match a color to save his life.

In the end the shoulders on the tailor's suit are so traditional boxy cut that I look like a football player. The quality is good but the cut is atrocious so I am going to sell them this week on craigslist for whatever I can get to free up closet space. The MWH suit isn't THAT bad, but you can certainly do better if you know what you are looking for.
post #56 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiecollector
The first 2 I got from a tailor, supposedly made from the same fabric as Hugo Boss according to the tailor.
I did not know that Hugo Boss uses a specific fabric for his suits.
post #57 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by epa
I did not know that Hugo Boss uses a specific fabric for his suits.

They can't, but the suits I got were made from the same fabric that one of their lines was made from. I actually saw the same fabric and pattern in Macy's a month later, just a much much nicer cut on the Boss suit. They were both made in the same factory apparently. I think he said Austria.
post #58 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Augusto86
Nonsense. Why just the other day, I ventured amongst the proletariat on the subway wearing nought but Ralph Lauren Blue Label, mere Loakebrogues, and a tie whose dimple was slighty left of center. I feel like a true man of the people, indistinguishable from the great and smelly masses...truely in touch, mon ami, and quite well integrated.

Be careful, prolonged contact with the proletariat seems to be affecting your command of the English language.....
post #59 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schmiddy
I've been lurking here for several months, so I don't know why I felt the need to make this my first post. But...
I've learned a lot from this forum. My eye for quality clothing has improved dramatically, I've learned how to choose clothes that I like and find fair deals on them. I have also invested many hours of time to reading books and this forum, and many more in shopping for clothes that I want.
For those without the time or the finances to to what I did, Men's Warehouse is a very nice solution. It served me well for many years before becoming interested in finer clothing. While nothing there is excellent, a lot of it is acceptable; especially if you're just trying to look professional and aren't aspiring to be a fashion icon. Their sales people are helpful and understand the basics of coordination. My years of wearing Men's Wearhouse clothes never won me any awards, but I never looked like a slob (i.e. like many of my coworkers). I never bought anything overly fashion-y that hasn't stood the test of time.
I recently spent a week in Prague with an Englishman, a Frenchman, and an Italian- all very nice dressers. After wearing my finest, the only outfit that I wore that garnered compliments? 6-year-old blue Claiborne suit from MWH, white Brooks Brothers no-iron shirt, Altea tie, Cole Haan shoes. Junk clothes by anyone's definition but they fit me well, were well coordinated, and were well cared for.
Now that I know better, I'm happier with my Barbera suits and Borrelli shirts than the stuff I got at MWH. But there are a lot worse options out there for those who don't plan to make clothing their hobby/obsession.
I know I've got it coming... let the flames begin.

As you know from reading here, fit is the bulk of the game. You'll always look decent if the fit is good.

I guess the issue I'd take is whether you've received good value. Three $250 suits from MWH can't equal two $375 deeply discount BB/Corneliani/etc that the SF has enlightened you to, right?
Similar point with the shoes. My $125 close-out C&J are so much better than my J&M (CH-equivalent).
Same money, but you end up in a different place.
post #60 of 70
Christofuh, I think the obsession comes in when you are taking great efforts in wearing clothes that please you, but few others will notice the difference. I'll let you judge whether or not that constitutes obsession. My earlier point is that 90% of american men have no taste whatsoever when it comes to clothes, and don't enjoy the process of shopping. For that large majority of men, MWH can provide a valuable service; reasonably priced, unobtrusive clothing with a minimum of effort. A $300 all-wool suit may be rubbish to you, but it's a heck of a lot nicer than the Dockers/golf shirts that most of those people would wear otherwise. Now that's rubbish.
Augusto- hilarious!
Mr. Checks- your point is well taken but you have to factor time into the value equation. Personally, I'd rather pay retail for a high-quality suit that is EXACTLY what I want and fits me perfectly than spend 8 hours combing e-bay and bargain racks. A few months ago, I spent about $400 on some Santoni shoes- I feel like it was a good value because they are beautiful shoes and they felt perfect the first time I put them on. Afterwards, I bought a similar pair of Santonis off of e-bay for $90. They hurt my feel and I almost never wear them. I may as well have lit the $90 on fire.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › F*** menswearhouse