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Shirt Collars - Fused or Unfused? - Page 3

post #31 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post
Interfaced collars tend to feel stiffer because of the glue, but you wouldn't get rid of it by separating the shell fabric from the interfacing. So I don't see how that would make the collar any softer.

As someone said above, fusible and sew-in interfacings come in lots of weights and stiffnesses. Just because it's sew-in doesn't mean it'll be soft (and vice versa).

Seriously the collar was much softer and limp. It could be due to the multiple washes there's hardly any glue left.
post #32 of 47
The glue wouldn't be worth much if it was water soluable. All interfacing gets softer after multiple washes, though.
post #33 of 47
I find fused collars easier to deal with when it comes to laundering (I send mine out). They come back neater as they're easier to press. As far as durability, chances are a shirts not going to last you more than a few years anyway, and collars can always be replaced if the cloth is available (just changed about 10 of mine). Unfused also cost more as they are more labor intensive. I guess its kind of like hand sewing on a shirt, doesn't make it better or worse, just different.
post #34 of 47
As somebody who is fairly new to non-fused can somebody give some tips on ironing the collar and collar band without getting creases everywhere?
post #35 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post
As somebody who is fairly new to non-fused can somebody give some tips on ironing the collar and collar band without getting creases everywhere?

Strech the collar while you iron: one hand one the iron and one hand on the collar band, streching and ironing away from you. Also, iron less, press more (i.e. less sliding of the iron across the collar, more pressing, picking up, moving, and pressing a different spot). Otherwise, you'll tend to push the fabric towards one end of the collar and create a small crease as this wave of extra fabric washes up on the shore of the edgestiching.
post #36 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by whatsinaname View Post
Strech the collar while you iron: one hand one the iron and one hand on the collar band, streching and ironing away from you. Also, iron less, press more (i.e. less sliding of the iron across the collar, more pressing, picking up, moving, and pressing a different spot). Otherwise, you'll tend to push the fabric towards one end of the collar and create a small crease as this wave of extra fabric washes up on the shore of the edgestiching.

This is good advice. Whenever I would stretch the collar band and push the iron away from me it would just cause ripples and creases across the actual collar. Maybe just pressing without sliding will do the trick. Thanks.
post #37 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grammaton Cleric View Post
The first video here shows how to identify a fused collar:

http://community.tmlewin.co.uk/look-...campaign=link3

Very helpful. Thanks.
post #38 of 47
There are soft fused collars and stiff unfused ones. For instance, the classic English shirt has a pretty stiff unfused collar. Few commercial laundries iron those properly.
post #39 of 47
I would appreciate some help.
Is there any unfused collar among the following or are they all (very) lightly fused?
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)





post #40 of 47
My favorite shirt has an unfused collar and cuffs, and I definitely like that look and feel. However, the collar band is fused. I'm about to place an order for two new shirts and am considering going unfused on the collar band as well; would anyone recommend this or do I run the risk of it looking too sloppy and having the collar flatten beneath the jacket lapels if worn tieless?

Thanks
post #41 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Louis XIV View Post

I would appreciate some help.
Is there any unfused collar among the following or are they all (very) lightly fused?
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)






I find it hard to tell from just the pics... I'd say most look unfused but I do have a Barba shirt with a real nice collar roll, similar to those above, which has medium-soft fused interlining.
post #42 of 47
I favor an unfused collar. If you iron it correctly (or rather your servant/cleaner does) and you starch it up, it can still look incredibly sharp. The result is more like paper than cardboard which I think is more attractive. Of course the fused collar is a modern creation, a substitute for the cardboard like detachable starched collars. For me I would rather do soft unfused or go the whole hog and have a detachable starched collar.
post #43 of 47
I have found that I prefer a stiffer fused collar that stay up without collar stays and yet have a little give.
post #44 of 47
I use both. For shirts worn with tie I prefer the look (more curvature) and feel of an unfused collar. The exception is my evening shirt where I wanted a stricter looking fused collar. For shirts worn primarily with open collar I give preference to a fused collar.
post #45 of 47
Interesting the variety of views here. For "suit shirts" I prefer the extra stiffness of the fused collar. For everything else unfused, although truth be told, I have a lot of serviceable semi-casual shirts with fused collars.
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