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One cheese to rule them all - Page 5

post #61 of 445
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
I think he meant raw milk Epoisses, not the pasteurized milk version that's authorized for sale in the US.

Stupid me, I thought that since the raw milk cheese ban was partially lifted, you could get it here now. Since it is aged less than 60 days, it is still generally illegal here although this site claims to have the real thing here in the States:
http://www.dibruno.com/Detail.bok?no=642
post #62 of 445
Quote:
Originally Posted by KObalto View Post
Stupid me, I thought that since the raw milk cheese ban was partially lifted, you could get it here now. Since it is aged less than 60 days, it is still generally illegal here although this site claims to have the real thing here in the States:
http://www.dibruno.com/Detail.bok?no=642

It does say raw milk. I didn't know it was allowed for sale here - I stand corrected.
post #63 of 445
i just got a pound of Beechers barley buzzed raw cheese delivered, that stuff is too good. Also, Beemsters XO aged Gouda has the tastiest little crack crystals in it.... soooooo good with some fig. Oh, dont forget Humbolt Fog by Cypress hill....
post #64 of 445
Quote:
Originally Posted by KObalto View Post
Stupid me, I thought that since the raw milk cheese ban was partially lifted, you could get it here now. Since it is aged less than 60 days, it is still generally illegal here although this site claims to have the real thing here in the States:
http://www.dibruno.com/Detail.bok?no=642

Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
It does say raw milk. I didn't know it was allowed for sale here - I stand corrected.

right, hence the other half of my "right people" jest - I know a hanful of restaurants are serving it with raw milk, I was able to get my hands on a wheel not too long ago.
post #65 of 445
All this talk of mimolette, forced me too pick up a nice aged piece last night. Expensive stuff too.

Overall wasn't too impressed, it was good... but much preferred the aged pecorina (sp.?) I also picked up.
post #66 of 445
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
right, hence the other half of my "right people" jest - I know a hanful of restaurants are serving it with raw milk, I was able to get my hands on a wheel not too long ago.
that stuff has always been around if you were in the right city and knew where to look. it was funny, some cheese stores (no names) even put on their cheese boards "cru lait", i guess the health inspectors didn't read french.
post #67 of 445
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post
that stuff has always been around if you were in the right city and knew where to look. it was funny, some cheese stores (no names) even put on their cheese boards "cru lait", i guess the health inspectors didn't read french.

StyleForvm is a gold mine for health inspectors who hope to debate the merits of waist suppression AND bust the stores who sell raw milk cheese at the same time
post #68 of 445
I had a taleggio and oyster mushroom pizza last night. amazing.
post #69 of 445
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
StyleForvm is a gold mine for health inspectors who hope to debate the merits of waist suppression AND bust the stores who sell raw milk cheese at the same time
yeah, there's probably even some folks in CE who wouldn't be adverse to using a little waterboarding to help get names. but they'll get nuthin outta me!
post #70 of 445
A good mature Stilton takes some beating. Not for everyone, though.

Or from my present country, Smoked Provola, from Campania, made with Buffalo milk.

An interesting radio programme on New World Cheeses here
post #71 of 445
haven't been to campania (want to go, though), but do they ever roast that provola? in umbria, there's a slightly similar cheese called scamorza that they roast on a wood fire ... picks up just a little smoke flavor, but amazing texture.
post #72 of 445
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post
haven't been to campania (want to go, though), but do they ever roast that provola? in umbria, there's a slightly similar cheese called scamorza that they roast on a wood fire ... picks up just a little smoke flavor, but amazing texture.

Wow, do they really roast it, or do they just singe it like Tomme Brulee?
post #73 of 445
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post
haven't been to campania (want to go, though), but do they ever roast that provola? in umbria, there's a slightly similar cheese called scamorza that they roast on a wood fire ... picks up just a little smoke flavor, but amazing texture.

Yes, the lovely scamorza hang up in clusters in many salumerie.
I'm sure the provola is used in roast dishes but can't say I've experienced it.
post #74 of 445
what was wrong with the old cheese thread? http://www.styleforum.net/showthread.php?t=77603 I honestly haven't eaten much cheese in the past few months unless it's something new i haven't tried. So i still eat it a fair amount but usually just a bite or two to get the flavor profile of something i haven't had. Never do a cheese wine bread type dinner thing anymore as i used to more often. I'm sure a lot of it is the heat. Once it gets cooler i can see myself doing it more again. I've liked quadrello di bufula more than tallegio lately for that style of cheese. Mainly been going with fresh mozzarella, ricottas, and burratas lately. Mozzarella House in Everett, MA makes really nice versions of those 3. The owner is a really friendly guy with a thick italian accent and thicker chest hair. The product is all made by hand and very traditionally, much more so that some other local mozzarella places in the northeast.
post #75 of 445
A few provola recipes here. The peperonata one looks tempting. Run it thru Goog.
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