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One cheese to rule them all - Page 29

post #421 of 445
Day #9 Moses Sleeper, Cellars at Jasper Hill, Vermont

post #422 of 445
Day #10: Green Hill, Georgia

post #423 of 445
Day #11 - St. Mary's Grass-fed Gouda, Faribault MN

post #424 of 445
CG,

what is a cheddar that I can find that would knock me on my ass?
post #425 of 445
Motgomery's, if you ask me.

Also, CG, this should have its own threak.
post #426 of 445
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

Also, CG, this should have its own threak.
I agree.
post #427 of 445
"Own threak" - tell me more what you mean.
post #428 of 445
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

Motgomery's, if you ask me.
Also, CG, this should have its own threak.

thank you, seems that my local cheesemonger traffics in it.
post #429 of 445
Murray's has a few good cheddars (including Montgomery's)
post #430 of 445
Ed- you are so lucky to be in NYC. You can get just abot anything worthwhile and in excellent shape, especially from Murray's Saxelby, Artisanl etc.



Matt is right about Montgomery's *IF* you are really into English/ farmhouse style cheddar. The bandaged-wrapped cheddars like Montgomery have little in common with commodity brick cheddars or the American styles that dominate Vermont and Wisconsin. If you're like most people who want orange (nothing wrong with that), consistent and sharp... cheeses like regular Cabot or Tillamook are fine.

But for the true cheddars with big flavor, dusty mineral qualities and that truly represent the grasses/flowers/feed the cattle ate and are transparent representations of the milk, aged farmhouse and bandaged is the way to go.

Montgomery from Neal's Yard is always good. certainly... Murray's cave-ages theirs further and they have it in stock now.

But Murray's also has a fairly rare cheddar right now that is one of the best I've ever had: "Isle of Mull". I mentioned it earlier in this threak.
It's incredible- picks up a bit of brininess from their Atlantic island climate. It's an original Somerset cheddar. Fabulous.

Here's a pic:


Third- check out Bleu Mont Cheddar from Willi Lehner in Wisconsin (also at Murrays). Small one-man maker basically that is doing cheddars in the farmhouse style. Very good. I'm blogging that one soon- lots of timber, loam, sweet grass going on there.

And for another from England that is a little different, more moist, there's Mary Quicke's cheddar. A little mild for my tastes but consistently well done.
post #431 of 445
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post

Ed- you are so lucky to be in NYC. You can get just abot anything worthwhile and in excellent shape, especially from Murray's Saxelby, Artisanl etc.
Matt is right about Montgomery's *IF* you are really into English/ farmhouse style cheddar. The bandaged-wrapped cheddars like Montgomery have little in common with commodity brick cheddars or the American styles that dominate Vermont and Wisconsin. If you're like most people who want orange (nothing wrong with that), consistent and sharp... cheeses like regular Cabot or Tillamook are fine.
But for the true cheddars with big flavor, dusty mineral qualities and that truly represent the grasses/flowers/feed the cattle ate and are transparent representations of the milk, aged farmhouse and bandaged is the way to go.
Montgomery from Neal's Yard is always good. certainly... Murray's cave-ages theirs further and they have it in stock now.
But Murray's also has a fairly rare cheddar right now that is one of the best I've ever had: "Isle of Mull". I mentioned it earlier in this threak.
It's incredible- picks up a bit of brininess from their Atlantic island climate. It's an original Somerset cheddar. Fabulous.
Here's a pic:

Third- check out Bleu Mont Cheddar from Willi Lehner in Wisconsin (also at Murrays). Small one-man maker basically that is doing cheddars in the farmhouse style. Very good. I'm blogging that one soon- lots of timber, loam, sweet grass going on there.
And for another from England that is a little different, more moist, there's Mary Quicke's cheddar. A little mild for my tastes but consistently well done.

thanks for the info, I don't like the orange cheddars. Would I be able to buy some of those Gouda's at Murrays also? My wife likes Gouda.
post #432 of 445
They won't have the one I posted above- it's local to me. And it's atypical.

They do have Marieke- Wisconsin made, Dutch style, very good.
Try the Boerenkaas, and finally try the "Roomano" which is about as hard as granite wink.gif



You might also try Murray's cave-aged "Tumbleweed". I have a piece sitting next to me at the moment. Really complex. A bit like Cantal or cheddar.
post #433 of 445
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post

"Own threak" - tell me more what you mean.

Its own thread. It's an interesting enough series that it could stand alone.
post #434 of 445
Just saw this thread and really digging it.

Thanks for posting all that, CG.

Just ordered some of the Montgomery's.
post #435 of 445
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

Its own thread. It's an interesting enough series that it could stand alone.

Gotcha-

I'll work on that.
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