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One cheese to rule them all - Page 24

post #346 of 445
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post #347 of 445
crazy

i had some comte today. really reminded me of gruyere

also bucheron is rapidly becoming one of my favorite cheeses. i love how it has two textures both with different tastes. i think im developing a real liking for goat's milk cheese. never had one i didnt like
post #348 of 445
Isn't Comté that doesn't reach the brown banderole (12+ pts of 20 I think) often relabeled as Gruyère? Or am I mixing things up?
post #349 of 445
They are, in essence, the same cheese, alpine style, with variations brought on by regionalism.

Comté's full name is (was?) Gruyère de Comté. Both are raw milk, cooked-curd, pressed cheeses. Comté requires the raw milk of a specific cow and is restricted to the Jura. Switzerland has it's own regulations about Gruyère.

The scoring you refer to is grading, specifically, of Comté, based on appearance of the paste, the rind, the texture and the taste. It is used to qualify Comté specifically so that it can use the name Comté. Think sorta like Crus, Gran Crus, Riserva etc but it is not, to the best of my knowledge, based on age. a 36-mo. Comté that fails the taste test will not be sold as Comté at all. 15 and above gets to be labelled "Extra". 12-15 is plain-old Comté and below 12 they cannot call it Comté... I dunno if it get's relabeled Gruyère or what.

Real Emmentaler and Appenzeller are both alpine cheeses in the same style as Gruyère and Comté

If you are in the states, try Ascutney Mountain (Matt- they have it at Cowgirl and I believe it was at Cheese Plus). It's also alpine style and very good IMO.
post #350 of 445
Keep in mind- these cheeses (all artisan and farmstead for that matter) are largely going to vary from wheel to wheel. Fair to say that wheels from the same milking, same time period, same farm will be very similar... but the Comté from one part of the Jura can taste quite different from that of another. Terroir in cheese, you know.

As b1os has indicated, he loves the sharpness of the prime Comté wheels that are aged 36 months... the same source aged 12 months may be very different. But I've had young Gruyère I would have sworn was aged Comté.
post #351 of 445
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post

I dunno if it get's relabeled Gruyère or what.
That's what I heard. It may not always be the case, but they have to sell it as something, and I don't know of any jury that rates Gruyère.

FWIW, I didn't like the sharpness in one of the old Comtés I'vee had. It was really unpleasant. Another 36mo one was very balanced, not very sharp. That one was very good.
post #352 of 445
lol totally forgot i read something like this. so comte french and gruyere swiss? isn't jura right next to switzerland?

this one was very creamy and mild. would love to try some aged comte. maybe i'll make it a point to stop by murray's next time im in the city
post #353 of 445
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

lol totally forgot i read something like this. so comte french and gruyere swiss? isn't jura right next to switzerland?
this one was very creamy and mild. would love to try some aged comte. maybe i'll make it a point to stop by murray's next time im in the city
Jura is both a Kanton of Switzerland and a département in France. There is Swiss Gruyère and French Gruyère (and, as CG pointed out, Comté is originally called Gruyère de Comté). And the French one is likely relabeled "failed" Comté. Probably enough foo.gif for many people to bear. So I'll come to the conclusion that both Comté and Gruyère can be great, but I've had better Comtés.
post #354 of 445
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post

Least of their worries... but that earthquake in Italy today destroyed about one-third of a billion dollars worth of Parmigiano-Reggiano and Grana Padano.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post

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$300+M??? holy bejeezus that's a lot of cheese. Do they need relief workers to volunteer for the clean-up crew? I'll bring the bread! lol8[1].gif
post #355 of 445
So will this heavily affect the price development from now on for the next two years or is $300m just a scratch w/r/t the full amount?
post #356 of 445
I couldn't tell you but I'd expect costs to go up. Sounds like a lot of the newer cheeses, just starting to age, were more heavily hit... so there will be some gap where it's less available and prices should rise.

There's a maximum tolerance by the consumer on price so they won't have a lot of head room.
What I also don't know is how facilities were damaged. I've seen a few mentions of pasture lands and the livestock facilities getting hit... so the milk source gets slowed; then there's the cheese making and storage.
It'll be some time before they fully know. One article mentioned the long-term loss nearer $2 billion.
Quote:
"We've lost two years of work," said Lorenza Caretti, whose family runs the Sant' Angelo cheese cooperative in the town of San Giovanni in Persiceto.

"We may be able to sell some of it for use in melted cheese products but that has only 20 percent of the value of the real thing," she said by telephone.

She said 22,000 wheels of hard cheese fell over in their warehouse during the quake.

"We still can't see the floor in many places," she said. "We will be lucky if we can somehow save half of it."

Production of milk used for cheese making in the area was also affected because many cows died in the collapse of stables or were left traumatized by the quake and its aftershocks, affecting the output and quality of milk, Coldiretti said.
post #357 of 445
Cheese and Charcuterie lunch at the Court Restaurant, British Museum last Tuesday...

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post #358 of 445
Stichelton fresh from Neal's Yard, Borough Market, London on Friday.
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A selection of goat cheeses- I had the Innes Brick on the right- to the left is an Innes that was two weeks younger- very runny and milder in flavor.
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Montgomery Cheddar, the Innes Brick and Basque Cochon, "Saucisson des Aldudes" from http://www.thehamandcheeseco.co.uk/ stall in the Borough.
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post #359 of 445
Wall of Montgomery Cheddar's at Neal's Yard. They chill the entire shop ala the French style...


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post #360 of 445
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post

Stichelton fresh from Neal's Yard, Borough Market, London on Friday.
How did it taste?
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