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Canvassed suit drenched

post #1 of 34
Thread Starter 
There hasn't been a ton of conversation here about this, surprisingly. I had a good suit completely drenched in the rain yesterday. The coat is still damp and kind of puckered up this morning. I am planning on having the suit cleaned by my (very good) cleaner, but I'm still concerned about things like blown-out seams.

I've had suits drenched before, but it has been years ago. Back then I didn't care or know as much about the details of my clothes. from memory those suits were fine, but then they were all relative garbage to begin with.

Will a proper cleaning be enough to restore my suit to pre-drench conditions?
post #2 of 34
I have had a few suits drenched before, from trail-and-error, the best solution I have found is:

1. Put a hanger in the jacket and use a trouser-hanger for the trousers (do not use a hanger where the trousers need to folded) and leave outside to dry out. If you are not able to leave clothes outsiude without protection from rain, you could leaver them indoors.

2. Once dry, brush down both garments

3. Iron on a low heat


However, if someone does have a better method, I would also be interested.
post #3 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macallan View Post
I have had a few suits drenched before, from trail-and-error, the best solution I have found is:

1. Put a hanger in the jacket and use a trouser-hanger for the trousers (do not use a hanger where the trousers need to folded) and leave outside to dry out. If you are not able to leave clothes outsiude without protection from rain, you could leaver them indoors.

2. Once dry, brush down both garments

3. Iron on a low heat


However, if someone does have a better method, I would also be interested.

Chicago is too humid in the summer to allow anything to dry, so I always dry my wet clothing indoors, and it works perfect. For pants, use this type of hanger, and clip the trousers at the top for maximum breathability and let them hang in an open place to totally dry:



Coat should be hung indoors in open air on a strong, thick suit coat hanger, like this, but preferably even thicker, so that the shoulder shape can be maintained during the dry-down:



If the suit is going to the cleaners, which is a smart move, then let them do the ironing. No need to iron, then send to the cleaners to be ironed again - every ironing reduces the life of the wool.
post #4 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Louche View Post
There hasn't been a ton of conversation here about this, surprisingly. I had a good suit completely drenched in the rain yesterday. The coat is still damp and kind of puckered up this morning. I am planning on having the suit cleaned by my (very good) cleaner, but I'm still concerned about things like blown-out seams.

I've had suits drenched before, but it has been years ago. Back then I didn't care or know as much about the details of my clothes. from memory those suits were fine, but then they were all relative garbage to begin with.

Will a proper cleaning be enough to restore my suit to pre-drench conditions?

Go see a tailor (proper one) not a cleaner. I've seen mine restoring a white tie suit that was drenched by the rain and then stuffed into a suitcase for 36 hours (not a pleasant view) and with some work and knowledge it became perfect back!
post #5 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Louche View Post
There hasn't been a ton of conversation here about this, surprisingly. I had a good suit completely drenched in the rain yesterday. The coat is still damp and kind of puckered up this morning. I am planning on having the suit cleaned by my (very good) cleaner, but I'm still concerned about things like blown-out seams.

I've had suits drenched before, but it has been years ago. Back then I didn't care or know as much about the details of my clothes. from memory those suits were fine, but then they were all relative garbage to begin with.

Will a proper cleaning be enough to restore my suit to pre-drench conditions?

Don't worry about it. Clothes get wet sometimes; it can't be helped. Give it for cleaning and a good pressing (by hand if possible to help restore the shape), and hopefully it should be fine. Sometimes you might be unlucky, but really, you can't plan for every eventuality.
post #6 of 34
If you care about the suit, take it to a tailor, especially if it's canvassed. Have it cleaned after, if necessary.
post #7 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Stall View Post
If you care about the suit, take it to a tailor, especially if it's canvassed. Have it cleaned after, if necessary.

This.
post #8 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Stall View Post
If you care about the suit, take it to a tailor, especially if it's canvassed. Have it cleaned after, if necessary.

Doesn't it make more sene for it to be cleaned prior to pressing? Why have him press all the nasty rain shit in to it?
post #9 of 34
Yes that does make sense, but I would rather have some rain residue residing in the cloth of my suit, than have cleaner press a botched up canvassed suit. It's not an easy job, and while the liquid cleaners use doesn't affect the fibres, water does, so getting it back into shape needs hands that understand what a suit is. Cleaners generally don't, other than that it's a dirty thing that needs to be cleaned.

In the end, rain is just water, you know.
post #10 of 34
You're in the DC area. Use Parkway Custom Cleaner in Chevy Chase. They pick up and deliver and their price includes it even if you drop off. I send my canvassed suits there. They hand press the jacket and hand roll the lapels. My recently dropped off HF Madison suit was returned with lapels looking much better than when it was new. Parkway has won awards for best cleaner in the country. The check in people usually know a good suit from a bad one and marked my HF Madison as delicate. It's a summer weight worsted fabric, but not marked super 120s or anything like that. A suit should be something like $40 for the jacket and $20 for the trousers. They also hand finish dress shirts if you want to go crazy. I bring all of my stains to them and have them do my suits less frequently than once a year. I don't send suits elsewhere, but I can't afford their hand shirt service everytime, so I do that every few months. Good luck, but I wouldn't go anywhere other than Parkway.
post #11 of 34
Might be a little off-topic, but the best pant hangar I've used so far:

http://www.containerstore.com/shop/c...uctId=10007856

$5 each and does the job of hanging pants straight/upside down.
post #12 of 34
Fair enough, though I doubt that it would be much worse than what deposits simply from polluted air. The dry cleaner option mentioned above sounds like a good choice.
post #13 of 34
BTW, here is Parkway's website and contact info: http://www.parkwaydrycleaning.com/
post #14 of 34
Maybe I missed something here. You got caught in the rain, right? You didn't get pushed into a mid pit. So don't get it cleaned at all. Yet. Let it dry slowly. The guts will take a while. Is it lined? Longer, if it is. If it didn't get crumpled or pinched, the whole thing should come out fine. You don't need no stinkin' tailor nor any $40 Chevy Chase cleaning job. Your really only worry is shrinkage and only God can prevent that and he's busy right now. After it dries you may want to have it professionally pressed. Or: do you have an iron? You can press all parts of a jacket (with a press cloth) yourself, save the sleeves. Get a tailor's ham (I love to say that), or an oven mitt and shove your hand up inside the shoulder as you steam the sleeve joint. Place a folded towel under the lapel so you don't get a sharp crease at the fold. I love the rain.
post #15 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peak and Pine View Post
Maybe I missed something here. You got caught in the rain, right? You didn't get pushed into a mid pit. So don't get it cleaned at all. Yet. Let it dry slowly. The guts will take a while. Is it lined? Longer, if it is. If it didn't get crumpled or pinched, the whole thing should come out fine. You don't need no stinkin' tailor nor any $40 Chevy Chase cleaning job. Your really only worry is shrinkage and only God can prevent that and he's busy right now. After it dries you may want to have it professionally pressed. Or: do you have an iron? You can press all parts of a jacket (with a press cloth) yourself, save the sleeves. Get a tailor's ham (I love to say that), or an oven mitt and shove your hand up inside the shoulder as you steam the sleeve joint. Place a folded towel under the lapel so you don't get a sharp crease at the fold. I love the rain.

Sounds like a disaster waiting to happen.
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