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50% OFF Jermyn Street shirt SALE - Page 2

post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203
Not my opnion and definitely not consensus. Functionally useless yes, mere affectation no. For many people, it is a sign of quality (especially if pattern amtching is top-notch) and additional attention from the shirtmaker, as well as an aesthetic preference
I stand corrected, thanks. I probably spoke too broadly, and was really just responding to Mr. A's point about split jokes making the shirt drape better across the back/shoulders, which is contrary to what I'd come to understand from other posts here. I certainly understand the aesthetic preference point, and my use of the term "affectation" was probably a poor way of acknowledging that, given its overly judgmental affectations.
post #17 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad
I don't claim to be an expert in shirt construction by any means, but a couple of things I've gleaned:
80's fabric, at least by the standards most people here associate with good quality shirts, hardly qualifies as luxurious;
the consenus among people who know far more about such things than I do seems to be that a split yoke is nearly or completely functionally useless in an RTW shirt and as such is mere affectation;
All moot as far as I'm concerned, though, because of the absence of different sleeve length choices for each neck size.

Just out of interest, if 80's fabric does not indicate a sign of quality and luxury at what point does a fabric meet that criteria? Much beyond this level of weave, you are moving into the 100's and 180's at which point shirts become beyond the economic means of most and far beyond the accepted defintion (by me) of luxurious??...Also with regards to the split yoke construction, I would agree with "gdl203" it's an indication of quality craftsmanship (especially if pattern match is accurate) and I would also argue this construction is not entirely useless within the RTW market - providng the chest measurement is a nice fit, then the split yoke would serve some functional purpose in provinding additional comfort across the shoulders?
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr_archiechan
I would also argue this construction is not entirely useless within the RTW market - providng the chest measurement is a nice fit, then the split yoke would serve some functional purpose in provinding additional comfort across the shoulders?

Many experienced shirtmakers disagree and have said as much on the different fora.
post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EL72
Many experienced shirtmakers disagree and have said as much on the different fora.

that's interesting....and possibly correct..given "there" experience...definately one for me to do more research into....however, perhaps - whilst I undertake my research - one of the experienced shirt makers (who contribute on this board) could let me (or all of us) know why almost without exception all leading dress shirt manufacturers, including those here in the UK i.e. 99% of Jermyn Street shirt makers..... construct their RTW dress shirts with a split yoke? And they all state this is done so to provide additional comfort? only as a an additional comment do they indicate that "pattern matching" has been applied in the split yoke construction...I accept, they could have all got it wrong or are they simply misleading us the consumer??....I would be very interested to know....
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