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Paying bribe for admission into top school - Worth it ? - Page 3

post #31 of 123
10% of your income doesnt seem that much for a one off payment. it depends how important your kids education is and how much time you can afford to spend with them while they are studying. if you can spend hours every day working through homework with them then any school will do. if you expect the school to set the standards of their success then you will need to spend the money.
post #32 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by rexthedestroyer View Post
a kid that came up through the state school system can easily become a CEO/MD/JD/POTUS, etc. The only notable exception is the US Supreme Court.

it may be *possible* but it seems extremely unlikely.
post #33 of 123
Thread Starter 
One reason I am reluctant to pay is that India is full of stories of men and women who are from villages without any schools and yet they have become hugely successful in all sorts of fields. That is why my personal belief is that my son will become who he becomes due to his own capabilities rather than a prestigious school. The point is I am willing to set aside my personal belief in case I am incorrect and the 'right' school does make a difference in his life. I dont want to think later in life that I should have paid at that time.
post #34 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by aj_del View Post
One reason I am reluctant to pay is that India is full of stories of men and women who are from villages without any schools and yet they have become hugely successful in all sorts of fields. That is why my personal belief is that my son will become who he becomes due to his own capabilities rather than a prestigious school.

On that note, how will you feel when your kid starts becoming a self-entitled spoiled brat like those of his peers?
post #35 of 123
Is this fee negotiable like with a street vendor?
post #36 of 123
Very unethical to do so
post #37 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by aj_del View Post
One reason I am reluctant to pay is that India is full of stories of men and women who are from villages without any schools and yet they have become hugely successful in all sorts of fields. That is why my personal belief is that my son will become who he becomes due to his own capabilities rather than a prestigious school.

The point is I am willing to set aside my personal belief in case I am incorrect and the 'right' school does make a difference in his life. I dont want to think later in life that I should have paid at that time.

Poor people have only theirselves to blame, there is no such thing as a privileged background?
post #38 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by aj_del View Post
^^ I told you how much a maid's salary is worth and how much my wife earns. I can tell you the price of a Coke and a McD burger (around 120 INR - 2.5 USD). Any other info you would like ....

And the most expensive tailor in Delhi charges Rs.10000 (USD 220) for making a suit. Labour only

India is pretty cheap, I am surprised. A lot cheaper than my country and yet,you won't see anyone making $38K annually. Coke and McD burger will probably be even more expensive than they are in the US.
As for the question, I probably wouldn't pay that much. It does seem a little high,I would just send him to the school you went and save the money for his college. Later down the road while he is still in school, I would just hire some tutors and spend part of the money.
post #39 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by aj_del View Post
^^ Dont really know what you are saying but for the sake of discussion assume that I make the Indian equivalent of 200000 USD

And if this info is still not enough, please refrain from participating in this thread further

I just read this, if you really make 200K a year in India then go ahead and do it, that's merely 10% of your annual income.
But let me ask you this, how much is a bribe to prestigious university in India? Assuming that universities can be bribed as well.
post #40 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by DNW View Post
On that note, how will you feel when your kid starts becoming a self-entitled spoiled brat like those of his peers?

I went mostly to private schools and this is a bs myth. Most of the kids were no more spoiled or entitled than any other kids. And within the school, there were very few divisions between the kids themselves, unlike the defined groups you always see at public schools. This is partly because everyone has to play sports and do extra-curricular activities together, you all wear the same uniform, and depending on the school, you might eat together too.
post #41 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek View Post
I went mostly to private schools and this is a bs myth. Most of the kids were no more spoiled or entitled than any other kids. And within the school, there were very few divisions between the kids themselves, unlike the defined groups you always see at public schools. This is partly because everyone has to play sports and do extra-curricular activities together, you all wear the same uniform, and depending on the school, you might eat together too.

What makes you think you weren't a spoiled brat then (or now, for that matter)?
post #42 of 123
i wouldn't. i'd let him enter whichever school he gets into from the other bests.

i don't think the network is worth it. those rich kids may not help your child in career or when he/she is down. what if those kids end up being trust fund babies with no power? what if your kid is influenced badly by the environment. like thinking he needs the things he cannot have.
post #43 of 123
Anyone who says this does not happen in America, in one form or another, probably went to public school.

I have known several people who donated money to the right schools, a couple before their child was even born. Some join the right country clubs, make connections and voila, acceptance through knowing the right people who know the right people.

Much like the question of dating a woman or renting a whore, it's just semantics.

In a few years time which would you regret more, doing it or not doing it? I would struggle in finding any reason to regret it.
post #44 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by aj_del View Post
One reason I am reluctant to pay is that India is full of stories of men and women who are from villages without any schools and yet they have become hugely successful in all sorts of fields. That is why my personal belief is that my son will become who he becomes due to his own capabilities rather than a prestigious school.

The point is I am willing to set aside my personal belief in case I am incorrect and the 'right' school does make a difference in his life. I dont want to think later in life that I should have paid at that time.

but realistically there are probabaly 200 people stories of failure for every one story of success, you may be underating how much luck and connections can help someone be successful.
post #45 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by DNW View Post
What makes you think you weren't a spoiled brat then (or now, for that matter)?

Well, I've worked since I was 14 or 15, partly to help pay for my private school one year. And I like to think I have a realistic view of the world, and don't expect anything to be given to me. So if i'm spoiled, I spoil myself, with my own money.
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