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Do you know martial art? What kind? What Level? - Page 11

post #151 of 193
I did Taekwondo for a while but stopped basically I can't afford to damage my hands, even scratches/lacerations would be bad. Board breaking was fun though.
post #152 of 193
really enjoying this discussion btw DucatiCole / mizanation.

makes me want to sign up for an aforementioned mma gym.

Oh well, I will have fun doing Judo (starts tomorrow!) and look forward to some MMA training in Japan.
post #153 of 193
judo is great, man. depending on the gym, you won't be disappointed. if possible, go to a place that has a few olympians, or olympic hopefuls. those are the gyms that take training the most seriously. i've seen some judo places that were horrible. then again, i've seen some places that had a dozen olympians on the mat. watch their workout, you'll know if they are good or not. judo has two aspects. one is "tachiwaza" ("standing techniques") which involves throwing, the second is "newaza" (literally "laying techniques" but meaning is closer to "ground techniques") which involves joint locks, chokes and pins. don't worry about not training mma, man. you are doing judo, which involves a lot of work in the clinch range--the same range we were talking about. the difference between Muay Thai's clinch and Judo's clinch is that in MT, you are using the clinch to control your opponent and deliver knees whereas in Judo, you are using the clinch to throw or drop your opponent to the ground. like i mentioned before, when your opponent is on the ground, it's a lot easier to hit him or get away from him. not to mention, a good throw will drop both your bodyweights on his head, shoulder or neck. two great mma competitors whose basis are in judo are: fedor emalienenko (the number one fighter in the world) and karo parisyan (ufc contender). most of the top bjj fighters also train in judo (most of the gracies, ronaldo "jacare" souza--all have excellent judo). *edit* oops, i forgot a couple others: hidehiko yoshida, kazuhiro nakamura, hayato "mach" sakurai, pawel nastula, yoshihiro akiyama....... so, nothing to worry about, man! you're in good company.
post #154 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by DucatiCole
Low kicks are really valuable and I can't count the number of times I've kicked someone, who doesn't fight, in the legs only to have them drop both their hands as a reaction leaving themselves wide open. Also, you can usually kick someone from outside their punching range. The other thing Thai fighting teachs you is the clinch. A lot of fights end up with one person hanging onto the other one. From here, you can throw some knees and do some serious damage.

The thing I found that makes Muay Thai so effective is that it is fairly simple. You learn the basic punches, kicks, knees, elbows, defenses etc then drill them and condition your body until they become effective.

I just learned to do some "clinching" last week and it is a lot of fun... It's amazing how much control you can have over someone else if you get on the "inside" of them.
post #155 of 193
Just got back from the class and DAMN that's fun.

My club's classes are split in half, tachi and newa. The teacher says officially they compete in Judo tournaments, but the club is a Judo/Jiu Jitsu club.

Already got into doing throws, pins, and squirming out of them.. The guys here train 100%. I can definitely see a lot of potential improvement. He told me he wants me to start competing next month.

damn though.
post #156 of 193
I trained with Toshido Fighting Arts out of Kelowna, BC. David Lea is the instructor. If you are familiar with Sherdog, you can look up their team and see some of the fighters for yourself. They have a pretty impressive track record. I've trained with Rory MacDonald, Tim Jenson, Bob Shabaga, Jason Towns, Gary Wright, Mike Adams and David Lea. As far as I know, none of them have competed in UFC or Pride as of yet (they have competed in King of the Cage) but I wouldn't be surprised to see that happen in the next few years.
post #157 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian SD
Just got back from the class and DAMN that's fun.

My club's classes are split in half, tachi and newa. The teacher says officially they compete in Judo tournaments, but the club is a Judo/Jiu Jitsu club.

Already got into doing throws, pins, and squirming out of them.. The guys here train 100%. I can definitely see a lot of potential improvement. He told me he wants me to start competing next month.

damn though.

Hey Brian, what dojo is this? Sounds a lot like a dojo my brother used to attend.
post #158 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by DucatiCole
I trained with Toshido Fighting Arts out of Kelowna, BC. David Lea is the instructor. If you are familiar with Sherdog, you can look up their team and see some of the fighters for yourself. They have a pretty impressive track record. I've trained with Rory MacDonald, Tim Jenson, Bob Shabaga, Jason Towns, Gary Wright, Mike Adams and David Lea. As far as I know, none of them have competed in UFC or Pride as of yet (they have competed in King of the Cage) but I wouldn't be surprised to see that happen in the next few years.

Cool, man. Canada is producing some great fighters right now--just look at GSP, the crow, cote, etc...

I train at Ronin Athletics in NYC which is the New York branch of the Straight Blast Gym (same camp as Forrest Griffin The Ultimate Fighter champ, Rory Singer TUF competitor). my coach is christian montes, purple belt under matt thornton and mma competitor. we just moved to a brand new space close to times square, so if you're ever in NYC, come through and train with us, man.
post #159 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian SD
Just got back from the class and DAMN that's fun.

My club's classes are split in half, tachi and newa. The teacher says officially they compete in Judo tournaments, but the club is a Judo/Jiu Jitsu club.

Already got into doing throws, pins, and squirming out of them.. The guys here train 100%. I can definitely see a lot of potential improvement. He told me he wants me to start competing next month.

damn though.

glad you liked it man. in the spirit of style forum, i trained a little judo at the gym today.

have fun competing, i'm sure you miss it from your taekwondo days.
post #160 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by mizanation
glad you liked it man. in the spirit of style forum, i trained a little judo at the gym today.

have fun competing, i'm sure you miss it from your taekwondo days.

One of my instructers fought on "Friday Night Fights" at the Church St. gym in Manhattan. Does that sound familiar?
post #161 of 193
Tck13, it's a club really, not a dojo, though its USJA certified. Training takes place on my campus (SDSU). I dont think any of the guys are MMA competitors or anything, but some of them already have a lot of BJJ experience. My coach is a black belt, and the highest rank other is I think orange (in Judo, anyway, one of the competitors is really skilled, I believe he's very experienced in BJJ). Since I'm only going to be in America until next summer I'm going to have to find some place to continue in Japan (I'm sure I'll find a good place in Osaka), but I am already saddened to think that my time with this club can only possibly go for that short of time. And Miz, I cant wait to compete.
post #162 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tck13
One of my instructers fought on "Friday Night Fights" at the Church St. gym in Manhattan. Does that sound familiar?

yeah, church st. gym is a famous boxing gym in downtown manhattan. friday night fights is their local boxing show.
post #163 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian SD
Tck13, it's a club really, not a dojo, though its USJA certified. Training takes place on my campus (SDSU). I dont think any of the guys are MMA competitors or anything, but some of them already have a lot of BJJ experience. My coach is a black belt, and the highest rank other is I think orange (in Judo, anyway, one of the competitors is really skilled, I believe he's very experienced in BJJ).

Since I'm only going to be in America until next summer I'm going to have to find some place to continue in Japan (I'm sure I'll find a good place in Osaka), but I am already saddened to think that my time with this club can only possibly go for that short of time.

And Miz, I cant wait to compete.

i wouldn't be sad, brian. in osaka, you will find a ton of great judo clubs. in fact, the judo clubs in the kansai area are some of the best in all of japan--which makes them some of the best in the world. yoshihiro akiyama (K-1 Heros MMA Middleweight Tounament Champion) just announced yesterday that he will be opening up a new martial arts school in osaka. there you will be able to learn real MMA--they will probably have a muay thai/boxing coach, bjj and of course, judo. akiyama's base art is judo (where he was considered the bad boy of the sport) so you'll be able to pick up where you left off.

just be forewarned, training in japan is really, really, really tough. you will also find that the level of judo in japan is light years ahead of the united states.
post #164 of 193
Shodan in Kendo, as well as a Bronze Medal in the South-East Asian Regional Under-21 Archery tournament here.

My bogu and aluminum bow cost a whopping total of 1.8 grand...
post #165 of 193
Shodan, eh? Seriously? I am testing for ikkyu this Sunday. Not looking forward to it. My regional federation makes everyone start with the mid kyu grades, regardless of age.
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