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Do you know martial art? What kind? What Level? - Page 8

post #106 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbc
Sadly, I fear there is but one way to resolve this dispute: http://www.cinemagia.ro/getimg.php?id=2390&size=s
Or this:
post #107 of 193
i give up. kung-fu and ignorance wins!

post #108 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by mizanation
in japan, during the feudal age, there were many styles of jujitsu. these styles were used by the samurai for combat without a sword. these techniques included striking, eye gouging, small joint masturbation (your deadly finger breaking), throws that would simultaneous break the opponents arm, on top of chokes, joint locks and ground control. brutal techniques (especially the fatal finger breaking), but very hard to train realistically.

Hey, that's fuckin' sick.
post #109 of 193
Hey, that's fuckin' childish.
post #110 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by mizanation
Hey, that's fuckin' childish.

post #111 of 193
hadouken! sonic boom!
post #112 of 193
Personally I use Krava Maga as my self-defense of choice. The motions just feel right to me both physically and logically. I am in no way a pro...no formal lessons or anything, But I have practiced it using videos and practiced it with a friend for some very effective results!
post #113 of 193
I just started doing Muay Thai and have been doing it for one month. I train 2 days a week (Tues and Thurs) and then recover from Friday to Monday.

I would like to keep training until I can kick myself in the head and knock myself out.

Then my training will be complete. (yoda smilie)
post #114 of 193
Hmm, this came up from the dead.

Anyway, has anyone done any training in boxing? I wrestled for 6 years, and now that I'm in college and don't do anything, I am craving that exhausted feeling, when you wake up the next morning after an intense match/day of training and you can't move.

I feel like boxing could be the ticket. The only thing I am scared of is getting seriously messed up from getting hit in the head repeatedly. What different "levels" are there of boxing training? Can you train in it just like martial arts and maybe do some small matches/sparring after building up your skills, or is it like, join a gym and box a ton of real matches or nothing?

Also, what is the best way to find a good gym and how expensive is it generally? I am in Houston fwiw.
post #115 of 193
Most recreational boxing is done with headgear. I don't recommend doing it constantly, but if you spar with people you trust not to take cheapshots, it should be fine.

My martial art is a shiny badge and a not very concealed Glock 21.
post #116 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by FLMountainMan
My martial art is a shiny badge and a not very concealed Glock 21.

Impersonating law enforcement is a crime you know


Raley-

Boxing will definitely give you that "exhausted" feeling. Just do your research and find a good gym in your area. Even if you are not technically sparring, the pad drills, combination reps, and footwork excersises are more than enough to leave most people winded and sore the next day.
post #117 of 193
Who said anything about impersonating? You'd be surprised at the number of government drones they give a badge to....
post #118 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by raley
Hmm, this came up from the dead.

Anyway, has anyone done any training in boxing? I wrestled for 6 years, and now that I'm in college and don't do anything, I am craving that exhausted feeling, when you wake up the next morning after an intense match/day of training and you can't move.

I feel like boxing could be the ticket. The only thing I am scared of is getting seriously messed up from getting hit in the head repeatedly. What different "levels" are there of boxing training? Can you train in it just like martial arts and maybe do some small matches/sparring after building up your skills, or is it like, join a gym and box a ton of real matches or nothing?

Also, what is the best way to find a good gym and how expensive is it generally? I am in Houston fwiw.

Boxing is the best workout I ever had (until Muay Thai)

My story:

I wanted to find something more intense than Astanga Yoga (which I love) and I went to try BJJ. Then, when I went to check out the gym that had BJJ, I saw they had boxing also. Having boxed for about 6 months (a couple of years ago), I was more excited about that so I found a gym closer to me that had a better boxing program. When I went there (for my 2 free classes to try the gym) I saw people doing boxing PLUS kicking, elbowing, and kneeing also. I asked what it was and it turns out it was Muay Thai. It looked like more fun so I signed up for Muay Thai and I love it.

I think Muay Thai might be a little more intense of a workout because of using all body parts as opposed to just punching. But you can't go wrong with either.

The gym I go to is about $65 a month for 2 sessions per week (with a trainer). It is supposed to be an hour but always lasts longer because there is boxing after the class and the instructors usually ask us to stay longer to work out with the boxing students. I am wiped out and drenched after every session. As I said before, I go on Tuesdays and Thursdays and recover from Friday to Monday.
post #119 of 193
raley, boxing is great.

check out the different gyms in your area. if you can, go to an off-campus gym that has at least a few pro-fighters. you'll get a better workout than a "cardio-box" type gym. about getting hit in the head repeatedly, don't even worry, you're gonna be fine. first of all, you won't spar until you're good enough to. second of all, you won't spar enough or hard enough to sustain long-term damage. third, pro-fights (no headgear, lighter gloves, many rounds, cutting weight) are what mess people up and you're a long ways off from pro-fights. fourth, like the guy with the gun said, you'll be wearing headgear and using 16 oz gloves.

like Tck13 said, Muay Thai is also a great alternative. again, try to find a gym that has a few pro-fighters, not a tae-bo thing.

since you said you wrestled for 6 years, let me suggest you try out brazilian jiu-jitsu. i don't know the area too well, but here are some teachers that might be worth taking a look at:

http://www.leonardoxavier.com
http://www.travistooke.com

both have a lot of competition experience in brazil. travis tooke is a wrestler as well, so he might be able to transition better. if you start doing bjj now, i guarantee you, you won't regret it (and wish that you started earlier).

also, if you like to compete, BJJ has a lot more opportunities to compete at an amateur level than boxing.

if you STILL want to box, then, let me suggest one more option: MMA training. you will learn how to box, clinch, and work on the ground (submission wrestling) AND also use your wrestling. there is a very famous fighter in houston who has a gym:

http://www.revolutiondojo.com

yves edwards is pound-for-pound one of the best fighters in the world and he is based out of houston.

another school for mma is:

http://www.defend.net

they have a very wide curriculum which you might enjoy. they even have a reputable former pro-boxer teaching there.

there you go, hope you find what you're looking for.
post #120 of 193
I think that this


is really beginning to apply to this thread.

I study capoeira. I'm fully aware that 95% of it is is useless in a real combat situation, but to me its the most beautiful and exciting art. I think that after 10 or 15 years I might have developed my strength and my reactions to the point that it would be very difficult to hit me.

I would like to cross-train in BJJ and Muay Thai as well - I think combining the lessons of the three could be quite interesting. But I have no particular desire to go around hurting people.
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