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New Job: Question on Bonus - Page 2

post #16 of 19
short answer: don't burn your bridges longer answer: it would be smart to tell your boss to his face, do not give a reason that is a negative reflection on him or the company, and ask him how you can work out a notice period that will be the least inconvenient for him as possible. then work conscientiously during that notice period and try your best to train your replacement as well as possible. it may surprise you how much it will do for your career to be on great terms with former employers. or the other way around.
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas View Post
Not that I have a lot of experience with this, but why so curt? I would at least have words of thanks or something noncommittal but classy. Can't hurt to maintain the bridge just in case.

Basically, you want the letter (something permanent and in writing) to be brief and professional. You shouldn't burn bridges with it, nor should you offer advice or give any reasons or anything else like that. Polite, professional, to the point and nothing more. If you want to say thanks, that is fine. Beyond three sentences and you are probably rambling.

Speaking with your boss is different entirely, and depends on your relationship there. As I actively try to maintain solid relationships with my direct supervisors, I always give them a heads up so they can prepare. It sucks to get left high and dry suddenly. I also make sure to offer to train a replacement if they can find one in time. Smooth transitions help everyone and are always remembered.

But. . . be prepared to get walked right to your car by security the moment HR gets that letter, no matter when it says you are resigning.
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texasmade View Post
At my job, if you have to repay the signing bonus, it gets taken out of your last paycheck or gets paid out from any accrued PTO/unused vacation time.

I haven't had a dispute about this issue, but when I spoke to a labor lawyer in new york about a different but similar matter, she said that that was illigal. that they needed to pay you and then have you pay them back



I would offer to stay on as long as it takes for a peaceful transition. they won't want you to stay, but it makes you seem the really good guy. they will probrably throw you out right then and there. when you talk to your boss, be ready to walk.
post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter View Post
I haven't had a dispute about this issue, but when I spoke to a labor lawyer in new york about a different but similar matter, she said that that was illigal. that they needed to pay you and then have you pay them back



I would offer to stay on as long as it takes for a peaceful transition. they won't want you to stay, but it makes you seem the really good guy. they will probrably throw you out right then and there. when you talk to your boss, be ready to walk.

Interesting. Thanks for the advice. This raises an interesting caveat--if my letter of resignation states that my last day of employment will be 'x'--then will they continue to pay me through 'x', even if they escort me to the door after conversation?

I ask, because if they escort me to the door and do not pay, then would employer technically terminate my employment before my resignation takes effect? If so, what implications would that have on signing bonus repay? Just curious.

Thanks again.
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