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Death or This God-awful threak? - Page 23

post #331 of 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
stop all of this bullshit, nobody here besides KWilk clubs seals nor condones the activity. And nobody here actively supports the animal cruelty in the fur trade. And for your argument of necessity - the inits eat those out of necessity and have for thousands of years. Unless, of course, you have more of your weird proof that tomatoes grow in the arctic circle.

I'm ok with it.
post #332 of 345
Why the hell would you skin an animal alive? You get a much cleaner and less messy product after the animal is dead. Just try cutting the hair of someone wriggling in a chair to get an idea of how hard it is.
post #333 of 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by philosophe View Post
BTW, personhood as a philosophical concept is most likely derived from personhood as a category in Roman law. This thread is producing intellectual starvation. I am going to re-read Charlotte's Web.
I think we knew that already. The articles were not using personhood as a philosophical concept.
Quote:
Despite cognitive commonalities, the odontocete evolutionary pathway has proceeded under a very different set of independent circumstances from that of primates, Marino explains. The highly expanded brain size and behavioral abilities of odontocetes are, in a sense, convergently shared with humans, she says. "Dolphin brains are four to five times larger for their body size when compared to another animal of similar size. In humans, the measure is seven times larger -- not a huge difference. Essentially, the brains of primates and cetaceans arrived at the same cognitive space while evolving along quite different paths" Marino says. "What the data say to me is that we, as humans, are not that special. Although we are highly encephalized, it's not by much or for that long compared with odontocetes."
When the scientists were saying the dolphins should be treated as people, it is because of their cultures, complex languages, social networking/structure, consciousness/intelligence, emotional intelligence, and high cognitive ability. Even though they evolved into such a different environment, their cognition has been evolving almost the same as humans. The dolphins are being compared to some of humans' latest ancestors who we might consider as people. Some theorize that dolphins may eventually reach a cognitive ability almost the same as current humans if their evolution isn't disrupted.
post #334 of 345
I have a public announcement concerning the cruel torture and murder of Cow-Persons for the unnecessary use of their skin!

When the milk production of cows on dairy farms decreases, the cows are killed and their skins are made into leather. The hides of their calves, who are frequently raised for veal, are made into high-priced calfskin. The economic success of slaughterhouses and dairy farms are directly linked to the sale of leather goods.

Most leather comes from developing countries like India, and China, where animals routinely have their throats slit and their skin ripped off while they are still conscious. In India, a PETA investigation found that cows have their tails broken and chili peppers and tobacco rubbed into their eyes in order to force them to walk after they collapse while traveling long distances to slaughter.





FYI:

All of the aforementioned info is taken from the EXACT same site that Nosu3 got his info on the Chinese fur trade using dogs/cats. Even the pictures he posted are from this same Peta site. Interestingly, he failed to report on the slaughter of cows for leather, because as a hypocrite he uses leather.

http://www.peta.org/feat-fatalfashion.asp
post #335 of 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by IUtoSLU View Post
FYI:

All of the aforementioned info is taken from the EXACT same site that Nosu3 got his info on the Chinese fur trade using dogs/cats. Even the pictures he posted are from this same Peta site. Interestingly, he failed to report on the slaughter of cows for leather, because as a hypocrite he uses leather.

http://www.peta.org/feat-fatalfashion.asp


I didn't get it from that website and I'm aware of the information you shared. The leather products I use are not sourced from India or China (the ones from there are mostly leather products that are mass produced in stores).

I didn't post anything against leather because it would be hypocritical to do that, it's still good to see you looking into the issues further though.
post #336 of 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nosu3 View Post
I didn't get it from that website and I'm aware of the information you shared. The leather products I use are not sourced from India or China (the ones from there are mostly leather products that are mass produced in stores).

Do you source your leather products from where the cows die of happy old age, surrounded by their cow people families and loved ones, in a barn floored with the most fragrant hay and straw, with happy cow people songs playing...or do you source where they slaughter cows when the economic gain is to be had from ripping their skins off?
post #337 of 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nosu3 View Post
I didn't get it from that website and I'm aware of the information you shared. The leather products I use are not sourced from India or China (the ones from there are mostly leather products that are mass produced in stores).

I didn't post anything against leather because it would be hypocritical to do that, it's still good to see you looking into the issues further though.
Okay, enough. Stop posting stuff about fur, animal abuse, dolphins etc. or I will timeout and/or ban you. This is in the same category as Conne with the IRA, amerikaninja posting about girls, etc. Only warning.
post #338 of 345
uhm... can we bait him?
post #339 of 345
Live bait is inhumane. For shame.
post #340 of 345
Fuck the seals. Fuckin up my Easter holiday.
post #341 of 345
a vegan musician shared their weekly food journal on GrubStreet:

Quote:
Friday, July 9
For breakfast, I had a glass of hot drip coffee poured over ice, and an approximately one-by-one-by-half-inch chocolate-chip-cookie bar piece from the freezer — I was at my parents' house in Bloomfield, New Jersey, for a wake and a funeral. My mom made the cookie and she assured me it was vegan. It was actually pretty good — she does a decent job.

I was in Manhattan later that day and I had a medium actually iced coffee from the Roasting Plant on Greenwich Avenue.

I was back at my parents' in New Jersey for lunch, where I had half of a leftover half of a spinach burrito from the night before — essentially a quarter of a burrito. Then I had a shot of Jameson. Then I had an afternoon wake to go to, and between the afternoon and evening wakes I had one slice of cheese-less pizza from a place called Vinnie's in Bloomfield with a lot of veggies on top.

Later that night, I had three glasses of some cheap-looking Sauvignon Blanc that I thought would be crappy and was actually pretty good, and a handful of Old Dutch–brand hard pretzels with some hummus. I had another shot of Jameson before I went to bed.

Saturday, July 10
I am a pretty hard-core non-believer atheist, but this being a big family thing I decided to be part of the community and I took communion at the mass. So the first thing in my mouth was a communion wafer and a sip of wine. I don't really care — I don't believe in hell so I don't think I'm going there for doing this — but taking the communion, I thought it would be an appreciated gesture to be a part of the rest of the family and do that with them. After the internment, I had a grande iced coffee at a Starbucks and one of those really expensive granola bars that they sell there. I was about to get on a plane, so I knew I had to have something in my stomach.

I had a cup of ice water on the plane from Newark to Columbus, Ohio. In Columbus, I had a veggie burger. I've been vegetarian since 1988 and a vegan since 1998, and after all that, you hit a certain point where the idea of a veggie burger is really not appealing to you anymore. It's been a good ten years since I ate veggie burgers with any consistency. This particular one was made of rice, black beans, and beets, and that sounded appealing to me, and I went for it and it was really good. With the burger I had a Samuel Smith's lager.

At sound check at the venue, I had a Jameson. I took a nap and when I woke up I had a post-nap PBR. For the two days before I hadn't been getting a lot of sleep and had all this funeral stuff to deal with, so I was pretty tired that night, and over the course of the next few hours I had two cans of Red Bull, two shots of Patron Silver, and an Emergen-C mixed with a shot of Jameson. It's a really good, quick pick-me-up: mix, say, two fingers of Jameson, a packet of Emergen-C, and a dash of hot sauce. You're best off doing the orange or tangerine flavors; anything else doesn't work so well. It's not the tastiest thing in the world, but it gets the job done. And then at 2:40 a.m., before I went to bed, I had another beer.

Sunday, July 11
I started my day with an Optimum Rebound energy bar and a shot of hot sauce in warm water. That capsaicin gets your metabolism going.

When we got to this festival in Louisville, I had two cups of some kind of beer that came out of one of those kegs that's through, like, a plastic cooler, so I have no idea what it was. It was backstage beer.

I had a small bowl of some veggies in tomato sauce over yellow rice, which was advertised as a vegetarian curry. I know what curry tastes like, and this literally contained no curry at all. It was yellow rice, chunks of tomato, some corn, probably some previously frozen cut green beans, and it cost me $6. I'm still a little angry about that, especially because that was my one real meal of the day. Along with that, I had another no-name beer.

Monday, July 12
We were driving back to New York, so the day started with us leaving Louisville at 9 a.m. I had a Bragg's apple-cider-vinegar drink — I'd never seen their drinks before, so I thought maybe I'd try something new. It was a little disappointing. I like vinegar, it's not that I have anything against vinegar, but this being advertised as "ginger spice" flavor I'd expect it to taste like a little more than watered-down vinegar.

I had some fixin's from Whole Foods that I'd bought in Louisville to eat later on on the road, and at about 1 p.m. somewhere north of Charleston, West Virginia, I made a big sandwich out of them. There was some smoked-Cheddar-flavored Sheese — that's a non-dairy cheese — and some romaine lettuce, some baby spinach, some tomatoes, oil, and vinegar. It was like a sub.

I got back to New York, at which point I had two slices of Tofurky and another shot of Jameson.

Tuesday, July 13
We were at the WNYC studios in Soho that afternoon, and James, our guitar player who lives in Greenpoint, brought me a vegan Cubano sandwich from Boneshakers. It was great — with a Cubano, it's really about the pickles.

That night I went back to my parents' house to tie up some loose ends there and I ate some rice and vegetable concoction of my mom's with a green salad and a Cooper's Sparkling Ale that I found in the back of the refrigerator.

Wednesday, July 14
I started the day at Bagels on the Square, where I got an everything bagel with olive tofutti, lettuce, and tomato.

And then I didn't eat anything until about 8 p.m. when I made this dish for my wife and myself of gemelli with shallots and portobello mushrooms that I cooked risotto style. That was my treat, because after these few days of running around eating crap I was like, "Yay, I can finally cook!" The process is a little more labor-intensive than usual pasta — you start it off with a minimal amount of water and you keep adding water and white wine. Meanwhile, in another pan you're doing up some onions and some sliced portobello and oil and you eventually add them to the pasta. What I usually do is take it out, put some Italian parsley leaves on top, and serve it with some broccoli rabe — I blanched it and then sautéed it. We had a vinho verde with that — the perfect summer humidity cutter.

give me death ...
post #342 of 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
a vegan musician shared their weekly food journal on GrubStreet:



give me death ...

all i see is alcohol and vegetables for the most part. why the fuck would someone choose this ...
post #343 of 345
but think of the animals who DON'T have to suffer because you decided that a shot of hot sauce in warm water is part of a suitable breakfast
post #344 of 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
a vegan musician shared their weekly food journal on GrubStreet:



give me death ...

good lord, why would I possibly want to wake up in the morning with that?
post #345 of 345
Picture of said musician please. I quite literally eat more food by noon than that man eats in an entire week.
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