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The Ultimate "HARDCORE" Shoe Porn Thread (Bespoke only) - Page 118

post #1756 of 2366
Quote:
Originally Posted by MalfordOfLondon View Post

Bravo! These are fantastic.
looks great and kinda like JL St Crepin
post #1757 of 2366
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kuro View Post

i think a new customer asking to deal with Anthony (rather than just asking to make an appointment for bespoke) might not be received well.

Seems to me a very strange way of dealing with a potential customer.

In other larger firms, which have more than one shoemaker or cutter on their payroll, you can ask for the services of Mr X because he was recommended to you by someone you trust. (Just as you can go to a salon and ask for the services of a particular hairdresser.) JohnLobb (London) or any of the Savile Row tailors will accommodate your expressed preference. It is not unusual in Savile Row that customers have a working relationship with "their" cutter and not with the firm who employs him, so If the cutter moves from A to B, they will follow him.

If I ever were to commission a pair of bespoke shoes from Cleverley, I would know who I would like to deal with my order. And presuming, that person hasn't left the firm by than, the company would grant that request.
post #1758 of 2366
Quote:
Originally Posted by bengal-stripe View Post

Seems to me a very strange way of dealing with a potential customer....

Maybe. Perhaps it is possible for a potential customer to see Anthony specifically. However, I think asking to speak to the head of the bespoke team rather than a rtw sales person might be a better approach (not sure who poorsod spoke with).

By the way, didn't L'hommeRJ come to meet Delos after first having a similar experience with Berluti as poorsod?
Edited by Kuro - 3/19/13 at 3:50pm
post #1759 of 2366
The Berluti office in NYC couldn't get me in contact with the Paris store for an appointment and asked me to visit while I was in Paris. I visited the store on Saturday in Paris and was told to come back on Monday. On Monday the staff called someone (presumably the head bespoke guy) and was told he couldn't see me. I left Paris Tuesday. It seems to me the left hand doesn't know what the right hand is doing.
post #1760 of 2366

Nize!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kuro View Post


Thank you.

The DELOS team is intact and they are still making shoes in the Loire Valley, but agree from a customer perspective it is a bit sad that he is no longer independent. That said from what I've my gleaned from conversations with him and from what I've seen of Berluti's bespoke it appears to be good for him. Also, perhaps it is a mistake to conclude that because it is part of LVMH the quality and craft is diluted (i'm guilty of this as well). The main workshop is in Paris and the samples and photos I've seen appear to be at the same level as other Parisian bespoke shoemakers. Yes, many customer pick styles from the rtw line, but I saw traditional styles as well as classics with a twist similar to what Anthony was doing (there is one in particular that I'm considering so long as I can use my DELOS last).

Photo of my first pair:

post #1761 of 2366
I have a question that has been posed to me by a couple other shoe lovers. I am putting it here because it is about shoemaking + I am interested in what DWFII will say, and he posts on this thread often.

This question refers to the "heel curve" on ankle boots that is best seen from the side view. In many vintage boots, there is a pronounced heel curve where the back of the boot curves inward over the achilles tendon/ back of calf. It is undoubtedly a nice aesthetic feature when viewing boots from the side. Here is a 1940's ankle boot.



I am not talking about the entire side view of the boot, merely the heel area.

However, this curve seems to have almost disappeared (or at least shrunk a lot) over the years. Here is an example of a pair by Saint Crispins



The heel is much more straight up and down with a much smaller curve. What is the reason for this. fit, comfort, aesthetics, or a combo of all 3, or something else? THANKS in advance.
post #1762 of 2366
Quote:
Originally Posted by isshinryu101 View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

I have a question that has been posed to me by a couple other shoe lovers. I am putting it here because it is about shoemaking + I am interested in what DWFII will say, and he posts on this thread often.

This question refers to the "heel curve" on ankle boots that is best seen from the side view. In many vintage boots, there is a pronounced heel curve where the back of the boot curves inward over the achilles tendon/ back of calf. It is undoubtedly a nice aesthetic feature when viewing boots from the side. Here is a 1940's ankle boot.



I am not talking about the entire side view of the boot, merely the heel area.

However, this curve seems to have almost disappeared (or at least shrunk a lot) over the years. Here is an example of a pair by Saint Crispins

 


The heel is much more straight up and down with a much smaller curve. What is the reason for this. fit, comfort, aesthetics, or a combo of all 3, or something else? THANKS in advance.

 

My guess would be to allow for easier entry into the boot.

post #1763 of 2366
Quote:
Originally Posted by itraxx View Post

My guess would be to allow for easier entry into the boot.

Thanks, but I have enough guesses at it is. Looking for answers.
post #1764 of 2366
Quote:
Originally Posted by isshinryu101 View Post

I have a question that has been posed to me by a couple other shoe lovers. I am putting it here because it is about shoemaking + I am interested in what DWFII will say, and he posts on this thread often.

This question refers to the "heel curve" on ankle boots that is best seen from the side view. In many vintage boots, there is a pronounced heel curve where the back of the boot curves inward over the achilles tendon/ back of calf. It is undoubtedly a nice aesthetic feature when viewing boots from the side. Here is a 1940's ankle boot.

I am not talking about the entire side view of the boot, merely the heel area.

However, this curve seems to have almost disappeared (or at least shrunk a lot) over the years. Here is an example of a pair by Saint Crispins


The heel is much more straight up and down with a much smaller curve. What is the reason for this. fit, comfort, aesthetics, or a combo of all 3, or something else? THANKS in advance.

Some of this is just fashion trends, believe it or not. Back in the late 18th/early 19th century tall boots all leaned back, intentionally. The boots Hoby made for Arthur Wellsley had this extreme lean. Why? It was thought that it presented better when a "leg" was made at court.

Despite popular myth right and left lasts actually pre-dated straights (which came into being when heels were introduced) and then, when fashion dictated a more "natural"/organic/ locovore trend in everything, the rights and lefts came back into vogue.

If you make patterns from the old pattern books...Golding, Swaysland, Patrick , etc.--you'll find that most of the older methods result in that anatomically-correct-but-somewhat-extreme-to-modern-eyes curvature at the back of the shoe, which is especially evident on high top shoes or boots. I like it, myownself, but I have made chukkas and other styles of high top shoes with a straighter back curve as well. Both ways IOW.

The best shoe lasts just naturally have a deep curve to the back of the last, although some people find that it bites "them." It certainly bit me...bad...when I first started wearing shoes after a lifetime of pull-on boots.

This pair of sueded (reverse calf) chukkas has a slightly straighter back curve--I deliberately straightened the back curve on the last. But my jodhpurs and whole cut chelseas definitely have that deep curve.

All that said, a goodly part of this is also driven by manufacturers catering to a wider range of customers/foot shapes--statistical averages--and even the perception that the shoe will be easier to get into (which is not necessarily true, esp. if the shoe is made correctly).





--
Edited by DWFII - 3/28/13 at 4:32pm
post #1765 of 2366
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Some of this is just fashion trends, believe it or not. Back in the late 18th/early 19th century tall boots all leaned back, intentionally. The boots Hoby made for Arthur Wellsley had this extreme lean. Why? It was thought that it presented better when a "leg" was made at court.

Despite popular myth right and left lasts actually pre-dated straights (which came into being when heels were introduced) and then, when fashion dictated a more "natural"/organic/ locovore trend in everything, the rights and lefts came back into vogue.

If you make patterns from the old pattern books...Golding, Swaysland, Patrick , etc.--you'll find that most of the older methods result in that anatomically-correct-but-somewhat-extreme-to-modern-eyes curvature at the back of the shoe, which is especially evident on high top shoes or boots. I like it, myownself, but I have made chukkas and other styles of high top shoes with a straighter back curve as well. Both ways IOW.

The best shoe lasts just naturally have a deep curve to the back of the last, although some people find that it bites "them." It certainly bit me...bad...when I first started wearing shoes after a lifetime of pull-on boots.

This pair of sueded (reverse calf) chukkas has a slightly straighter back curve--I deliberately straightened the back curve on the last. But my jodhpurs and whole cut chelseas definitely have that deep curve.

All that said, a goodly part of this is also driven by manufacturers catering to a wider range of customers/foot shapes--statistical averages--and even the perception that the shoe will be easier to get into (which is not necessarily true, esp. if the shoe is made correctly).





--

Stunning ostrich jodhpurs! DWF, I forget whether you do your own lasting. If you do, how did you get your start? If not, where do you get your lasts made?
post #1766 of 2366
Quote:
Originally Posted by JermynStreet View Post

Stunning ostrich jodhpurs! DWF, I forget whether you do your own lasting. If you do, how did you get your start? If not, where do you get your lasts made?

Here in the US, the tradition is to do everything yourself or nothing. There are no outworkers, IOW.

If by "lasting" you mean making the last, I do not carve them from formless blocks of wood the way Delos does. Again, this is kind of a "tradition" here in the states (note that I did not capitalize "tradition")...hand carving of lasts is nearly unheard of here.

I designed my lasts starting with some lasts I knew, drastically cutting away the material that was not wanted (quite a bit of work actually) then sent them off to a lastmaker to make prototypes from which sized lasts could be turned.

That's what I start with...sized lasts...and then I cut or add according to the measurements. I currently have a customer whose foot looks like a 9C in my lasts--the heelseat width, the treadline width, the heel to ball length, as well as the pedographic "footprint", all are 9C almost exactly. But all the girth measurements are 2cm +/- larger than a standard 9C. So I have to build the last oversize and then "sculpt" it/cut it back down to measurement. Pretty exacting work, in fact.

If by "lasting" you mean drafting/pulling the leather over the last...which is what we mean when we say "lasting"...again, no outworkers, I do it all from start to finish. It's all me, all my responsibility.

And thank you for the kind words about the jodhpurs...the ostrich was not an easy leather to block.
post #1767 of 2366
BTW, you can click on the photos and get a larger view. My wife actually made the reverse calf chukkas...although I bottomed them (to her specs).
post #1768 of 2366
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post



uhoh.gif
post #1769 of 2366
sinnedk once again displays his poor taste and inability to comprehend anything beyond current SF groupthink.
post #1770 of 2366
Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post

sinnedk once again displays his poor taste and inability to comprehend anything beyond current SF groupthink.

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