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Life in Academia - Page 4

post #46 of 188
The toga (oft maligned at AAAC) is underappreciated and underdeployed collegiate apparel. I like this interpretation, because of the victor's wreath and versatile necktie:



Nice, huh?


- B
post #47 of 188
What says the Forvm consensus on the 3-piece cord suit for a professorial look?

post #48 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBC View Post
What says the Forvm consensus on the 3-piece cord suit for a professorial look?
A little 'east coast liberal' for Bob Jones, isn't it?
post #49 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post
A little 'east coast liberal' for Bob Jones, isn't it?

NOT BJU, but FU
post #50 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBC View Post
NOT BJU, but FU

Sorry, I saw Greenville and a nicer dress level then normal and presumed. Many apologies.

As for the look, I would stick to just the coat. A full cord suit is a tad much IMO.
post #51 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBC View Post
What says the Forvm consensus on the 3-piece cord suit for a professorial look?


How about an Irish sweater?



- B
post #52 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
How about an Irish sweater?



- B

Only when cavorting with coeds
post #53 of 188
My favorite movie professor - note the 3/2 roll

post #54 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trotsky1940 View Post
I teach Political Science and getting the look is, for me, part of the fun. I am late to the trad party but assure you that I will be wearing white bucs in the fall with khakis and a nice tweed jacket I just picked up. As it gets cooler out here I will go back towards my wools and vests. I don't do it to impress anybody, I do it because I enjoy it.

That being said...

If you dress the part, you will at least look like you know what you are doing. When I am even marginally dressed up I get called sir more, treated with more respect and people pay attention to me. It's odd, but it really is true. So in my vest, coat, tie and khakis I tend to have slightly more control over my classroom than when I was a young Adjunct dressed in polos and jeans. If you told me this five years ago I would have thought you were full of bullshit.

Also, I take lots of pride in what I do and my profession as a whole. Sure the "classic professor look" is cliche' at times but I love it!
Many of my colleagues either agree with me or just don't care. They don't have to. This profession allows you to maintain a certain air of professional eccentricity about your dress. I exploit that to the fullest.

I'm a political science academic as well - written anything I'd have read? . Do you not think the control you have over the room has more to do with your greater experience and confidence?
Not sure what it's like in the states - my experience is in the UK and now Australia - but there is certainly a strong anti-suit vibe in a lot of universities. Suits are seen as being for administrators or for people on the make. Usual uniform for me is shirt (Lewin, usually), dark jeans or chinos and something from my wide selection of Loakes. And that makes me smarter than most, I should add. Sports coat or blazer goes on in the classroom and the weather demands it. If I've meetings, particularly with outside bodies (more as I've been made Assoc. Dean of the Faculty, sadly), a suit get worn but usually results in people stopping you and asking what you're up to.
On the original article, I don't know whether academics are dressed substantially worse than other professions, but it's this lack of a dress code that allows the abominations. There's a limit to how bad you can look in a place where a suit is required whereas if you're free to wear what you like, you have the freedom to make an utter bollocks of it.
post #55 of 188
Great thread. I'm a junior academic here (humanities prof), and I can second some of what's been said here and in the CHE article. On one hand, things are more lenient for academics than for professionals in about every other field since dress "rules" are laxer and not heavily enforced. On the other hand, the lack of even an informal clear dress code means that clothing choices can be more fraught, especially for high-impact moments of professionalization like a job interview. And leave aside the issue whether academics focus more on ideas than appearance - there are still cultures that emerge in the academy and along with those cultures, expectations. In general, these expectations vary by: - Discipline. I can often distinguish a history or poli-sci guy from an English lit or art history guy and both from the sciences. The more "scientific" the more the expectation of ordinary, mass-market dress - think Eddie Bauer. Banana Republic looms large in the humanities. For some reason, English profs are fond of dark-colored dress shirts. - Type of Institution. Selective liberal arts colleges (especially in the South) will probably reward professors who play the part and look tweedy and academic. Top tier research institutions will tend to have the fashion-obsessed peacocks. State university academics tend to have a somewhat frumpy-somewhat dressy professional uniform. New Yorkers dress more fashion-forward regardless of institution. - Context. My department colleagues are pretty dress-down. Conferences (or invited talks) are a bit more of a fashion show, at least in some cliques. Job interviews have their own set of rules. - Age/identity. As some mentioned, grad students and younger faculty (especially women) may dress more formally to establish authority in the classroom. And I think the article covers how race and sexual orientation set up expectations of dress. One overarching rule that's constant in the humanities at least is that you can never wear any thing both formal and traditional so that you might be mistaken for someone in the corporate world or (worse) administration. Dandy is fine, quirky is fine, and schlumpy is fine. Just nothing that signals dress-to-impress.
post #56 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBC View Post
My favorite movie professor - note the 3/2 roll


That's not a Brooks 3/2, that's the older Brooks 4/2. See this ad...



...and note the position of the show buttonhole versus the breast pocket.

Don't worry...it's a common misconception.



- B
post #57 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBC View Post
My favorite movie professor - note the 3/2 roll
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
That's not a Brooks 3/2, that's the older Brooks 4/2. Don't worry...it's a common misconception. - B
post #58 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oleg View Post
I'm a political science academic as well - written anything I'd have read? . Do you not think the control you have over the room has more to do with your greater experience and confidence?
Not sure what it's like in the states - my experience is in the UK and now Australia - but there is certainly a strong anti-suit vibe in a lot of universities. Suits are seen as being for administrators or for people on the make. Usual uniform for me is shirt (Lewin, usually), dark jeans or chinos and something from my wide selection of Loakes. And that makes me smarter than most, I should add. Sports coat or blazer goes on in the classroom and the weather demands it. If I've meetings, particularly with outside bodies (more as I've been made Assoc. Dean of the Faculty, sadly), a suit get worn but usually results in people stopping you and asking what you're up to.
On the original article, I don't know whether academics are dressed substantially worse than other professions, but it's this lack of a dress code that allows the abominations. There's a limit to how bad you can look in a place where a suit is required whereas if you're free to wear what you like, you have the freedom to make an utter bollocks of it.

Unfortunately, nothing yet! My first book chapter is due out in an edited volume in February. International Relations focused.

Oh, control is very much a product of experience and confidence and dressing the part, so to speak, helps with the confidence part. Academia is all about the individual and so, as Junior Faculty, I feel it helps my image with both fellow faculty and students to dress the part. It all boils down to choice which is better than many of my office dwelling friends can do.
post #59 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by vincerich View Post
1) Riiiight. You do it to appease the misguided minions of the forum (or whatever article familiarized you with "trad").

2) As a political scientist, you should already have already been in the know about the importance of keeping up appearances and playing "the game."

1. Uh... Ok? I stop by this forum because it's fun to read. I see something I like on it, I incorporate it. White bucs, for example are something I would have never considered last year but I kinda like 'em now, thanks to my exposure to them here. I like the whole pre-1965 college look.

2. Heh, if I dressed the way I do as an academic in Politics I would get strange looks and laughed out of the building. I flirted with Politics for a while, I find that the two things operate in very different spheres.
post #60 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trotsky1940 View Post
Unfortunately, nothing yet! My first book chapter is due out in an edited volume in February. International Relations focused.

Oh, control is very much a product of experience and confidence and dressing the part, so to speak, helps with the confidence part. Academia is all about the individual and so, as Junior Faculty, I feel it helps my image with both fellow faculty and students to dress the part. It all boils down to choice which is better than many of my office dwelling friends can do.

that's really interesting - what's your thesis?

i mean, in brief
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