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The Keynesian Dead End - Page 6

post #76 of 127
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by geoffmartin17 View Post
Politicians and big business won't allow it - not in their interest.

Free markets are not in the interests of big business?

Riiiiight. High taxes, more regs, scared consumers, a terrible business climate, and a great recession benefit big business?

post #77 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artisan Fan View Post
Free markets are not in the interests of big business?


Nope. Not when a business gets as big as it does due to political protection and erects artificially high barriers of entry for competitors.
post #78 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artisan Fan View Post
Free markets are not in the interests of big business?

Riiiiight. High taxes, more regs, scared consumers, a terrible business climate, and a great recession benefit big business?

No, business is notoriously in collusion with government to squeeze out free commerce. They are together the great enemies of economic progress in the world.
post #79 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
No, business is notoriously in collusion with government to squeeze out free commerce. They are together the great enemies of economic progress in the world.

Hey, not all business! Smalltimer businesses like me aren't important enough to be in collusion with anyone.
post #80 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas View Post
Hey, not all business! Smalltimer businesses like me aren't important enough to be in collusion with anyone.
Of course you do. No, you are right. I mean business with the power to influence officials. It could be a small business in a small town, I guess.
post #81 of 127
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
No, business is notoriously in collusion with government to squeeze out free commerce. They are together the great enemies of economic progress in the world.

Collusion does exist; GE is an example of that.

But overall free markets really drive this economy and benefit most corporations.
post #82 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artisan Fan View Post
Free markets are not in the interests of big business?

Riiiiight. High taxes, more regs, scared consumers, a terrible business climate, and a great recession benefit big business?


Free markets are not in the interest of big business. Big business wants to buy influence and legislation to protect their interests. I am surprised I would have to say this to you. For an example, the one I always point out was the airlines paying people like Teddy Kennedy to fight deregulation. Why would the airlines do this, if not to prevent market forces from entering their sector?

Often, what's good for the macro economy and the consumer market is decidely not good for the interests of big business.
post #83 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
Of course you do. No, you are right. I mean business with the power to influence officials. It could be a small business in a small town, I guess.

JUst like poor people can be as materialistic as rich people small corporate citizens and local govs can be into big collusion.
post #84 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
No, business is notoriously in collusion with government to squeeze out free commerce. They are together the great enemies of economic progress in the world.

Not sure if you are being sarcastic or not, but if not, I agree w/ you. Yesterday's most successful capitalists make today's most ardent socialists. See the Hearst family.
post #85 of 127
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
Free markets are not in the interest of big business. Big business wants to buy influence and legislation to protect their interests. I am surprised I would have to say this to you. For an example, the one I always point out was the airlines paying people like Teddy Kennedy to fight deregulation. Why would the airlines do this, if not to prevent market forces from entering their sector? Often, what's good for the macro economy and the consumer market is decidely not good for the interests of big business.
I don't agree with this. While there are no doubt numerous examples of big companies throwing their weight around, I do believe most want free markets. I've worked with boat loads of senior executives and they are ardent free markets folks. Maybe there is a better case with the large multi-nationals but in my experience most companies with $500 million or more in sales want less in taxes, regulation, and public sector intrusion. In fact, they only want govt help in limited areas such as setting a common standard for data and certain processes so businesses can communicate better. Also on the last sentence above, I cannot disagree more strongly. The best companies from a shareholder value creation standpoint are keenly focused on creating a great customer experience. Happy customers drive long-term buying relationships. Firms that come to mind with a focus on the consumer are Apple, Wal-Mart, Lowes, Coca-Cola, Google, and ebay.
post #86 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artisan Fan View Post
I don't agree with this. While there are no doubt numerous examples of big companies throwing their weight around, I do believe most want free markets. I've worked with boat loads of senior executives and they are ardent free markets folks. Maybe there is a better case with the large multi-nationals but in my experience most companies with $500 million or more in sales want less in taxes, regulation, and public sector intrusion.

In fact, they only want govt help in limited areas such as setting a common standard for data and certain processes so businesses can communicate better.

Do they want more competition? Do they want more competition by people with competetive advantage? If we're honest, we know the answer for 99.9% of folks.
post #87 of 127
Why would they want to compete in a fair market when they can use their power to leverage an advantage over the competition?
post #88 of 127
Thread Starter 
By the way, we can talk in some detail about customer experience. Pete Turner, the CEO of Cost Technology, has discovered that on average 30% of a companies customers deliver the majority of a companies profits.
post #89 of 127
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
Do they want more competition? Do they want more competition by people with competetive advantage? If we're honest, we know the answer for 99.9% of folks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JustinW View Post
Why would they want to compete in a fair market when they can use their power to leverage an advantage over the competition?

One answer for both of these. Firms want free markets because they know that government control is far worse a scenario as an alternative. Almost all executives I speak with whether CEO, CFO, CMO, or CRO are most concerned about govt intrusion...and they all feel they have a competitive advantage to utilize.

In other words, they would prefer competition to the vagaries of a political process for the most part.
post #90 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artisan Fan View Post
One answer for both of these. Firms want free markets because they know that government control is far worse a scenario as an alternative. Almost all executives I speak with whether CEO, CFO, CMO, or CRO are most concerned about govt intrusion...and they all feel they have a competitive advantage to utilize.

In other words, they would prefer competition to the vagaries of a political process for the most part.
They are more concerned about government changing the rules than they are about government intrusion, because often their competitive advantage comes, at least partly, from the current way the rules are structured.
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