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Getting wrinkles out of suit while travelling? - Page 2

post #16 of 30
I don't read threads on this subject anymore.
post #17 of 30
I frequently travel to Europe and Asia for extended business trips (a month or more) with several suits. As others have mentioned, properly folding you suits is the first step to minimize wrinkling. There are a lot of posts regarding how to fold, so I won't repeat them. Do not use suit-carriers -- they are the worst. I only travel with hard-side luggage (Carlton) for extra protection and security (harder to cut through). No need for a travel steamer -- run hot water in the shower, close the door and hang your suit and trousers (fully extended) from the shower curtain rod -- works like a charm.

I only travel with dark suits -- navy, charcoal gray, dark blue pinstripe, etc. which even if slightly wrinkled does not show as much as lighter colors. Some fabrics, colors and patterns (especially Prince of Wales or Glen Plaid) look wrinkled more than others (solids or faint window pane). My travel suits for extended trips are not my most expensive nor are they superfine 120+. Sometimes less is more.

Twotone
post #18 of 30
Is there a certain brand/type of luggage that is better for packing suits? How are the wheeled garment bags that have hangers inside and fold over in half?
post #19 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twotone View Post
I frequently travel to Europe and Asia for extended business trips (a month or more) with several suits. As others have mentioned, properly folding you suits is the first step to minimize wrinkling. There are a lot of posts regarding how to fold, so I won't repeat them. Do not use suit-carriers -- they are the worst. I only travel with hard-side luggage (Carlton) for extra protection and security (harder to cut through). No need for a travel steamer -- run hot water in the shower, close the door and hang your suit and trousers (fully extended) from the shower curtain rod -- works like a charm.

I only travel with dark suits -- navy, charcoal gray, dark blue pinstripe, etc. which even if slightly wrinkled does not show as much as lighter colors. Some fabrics, colors and patterns (especially Prince of Wales or Glen Plaid) look wrinkled more than others (solids or faint window pane). My travel suits for extended trips are not my most expensive nor are they superfine 120+. Sometimes less is more.

Twotone


http://www.styleforum.net/showthread.php?t=88504
post #20 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by royal618 View Post
Fill your bathroom with steam from a running ahot shower and put the jacket in the bathroom. Don't hang them in the shower, or where they could fall off the hanger into water though.

This has always worked for me just fine.
post #21 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pasha View Post
This has always worked for me just fine.

Just don't forget to close the bathroom door so the steam can't escape to the room.
post #22 of 30
The bathroom steam trick doesn't always work. Best buy a proper portable iron and a small misting bottle and irong on the bed. With little practice you will be good at doing some spot ironing.
There are also fabrics that you can crunch into a ball and they won't wrinkle but I forgot what exactly those are, I only remember they are very light fabrics.
post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post
I don't read threads on this subject anymore.

Steam makes baby Despos cry?
post #24 of 30
The steam in the bathroom works very well.
The fabric of the garments is also key.
Years ago I had a blazer made by Chipp (Winston Tailors)
with the requirement that it be presentable after being
worn on a cross-country flight. It was and is. Downside:
it is a very heavy fabric. I also have a sport coat from
Battistoni which has been stuffed in the overhead from
San Francisco to Prague and was wrinkle -free within
an hour or two of arrival without the aid of steam.
Again, a hard tweed. Paradoxically, jackets which
contain cashmere and are softish seem to do well.
It's the modern lightweight "super" suits with
smooth finish which wrinkle the most. Correct?
post #25 of 30
A portable steamer is probably the best option.
post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twotone View Post
I frequently travel to Europe and Asia for extended business trips (a month or more) with several suits. As others have mentioned, properly folding you suits is the first step to minimize wrinkling. There are a lot of posts regarding how to fold, so I won't repeat them. Do not use suit-carriers -- they are the worst. I only travel with hard-side luggage (Carlton) for extra protection and security (harder to cut through). No need for a travel steamer -- run hot water in the shower, close the door and hang your suit and trousers (fully extended) from the shower curtain rod -- works like a charm.

I only travel with dark suits -- navy, charcoal gray, dark blue pinstripe, etc. which even if slightly wrinkled does not show as much as lighter colors. Some fabrics, colors and patterns (especially Prince of Wales or Glen Plaid) look wrinkled more than others (solids or faint window pane). My travel suits for extended trips are not my most expensive nor are they superfine 120+. Sometimes less is more.

Twotone
This is what I do, and it works very well. My carry-on for short trips is only 18" yet, I pack a suit in it. I hang it in the closet upon arrival (no need for steaming) and it's ready for wear, without wrinkles, the next morning. I've used garment carriers in the past without success.
post #27 of 30
Old thread resurrection. So I travel a lot and always wondered about various wrinkle removal techniques in a hotel room. I used to rely on the steam method, then I started using Febreze and gently tugging on the fabric - I know . One day last week I had some free time while in between meetings on the road and walked into a bespoke suit shop. We started talking and he said he thought I was a local cause my suit wasn't wrinkled like most travelers. I told him about the Febreze thing and the guy freaked out. He said it's a good technique in a pinch (using a small mister bottle), but use vodka instead as it will not harm the fabrics. Anyone else try this? Just used it last night/this morning and it worked like a charm. I misted my suit/shirt with the Vodka, waited for it to soak a little, then tugged on the fabric gently before heading off to sleep. Woke up a few hours later and it was good to go... Waiting for my SF account to get locked as I did it with one of my 15 milmil 15s (no, not the one I just bought here). Let the hate begin.
post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by PL92106 View Post
Old thread resurrection. So I travel a lot and always wondered about various wrinkle removal techniques in a hotel room. I used to rely on the steam method, then I started using Febreze and gently tugging on the fabric - I know . One day last week I had some free time while in between meetings on the road and walked into a bespoke suit shop. We started talking and he said he thought I was a local cause my suit wasn't wrinkled like most travelers. I told him about the Febreze thing and the guy freaked out. He said it's a good technique in a pinch (using a small mister bottle), but use vodka instead as it will not harm the fabrics. Anyone else try this? Just used it last night/this morning and it worked like a charm. I misted my suit/shirt with the Vodka, waited for it to soak a little, then tugged on the fabric gently before heading off to sleep. Woke up a few hours later and it was good to go... Waiting for my SF account to get locked as I did it with one of my 15 milmil 15s (no, not the one I just bought here). Let the hate begin.
I tend to spill vodka all over my suit on any given night when traveling. I have not noticed a reduction in wrinkles though.
post #29 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patek View Post
I tend to spill vodka all over my suit on any given night when traveling. I have not noticed a reduction in wrinkles though.

Probably cause you only spill the SF level best. I was explicitly told to use swill. I was thinking of taking it a step further with everclear but figured that aroma wouldn't be conducive to deal making.
post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by PL92106 View Post
Probably cause you only spill the SF level best. I was explicitly told to use swill. I was thinking of taking it a step further with everclear but figured that aroma wouldn't be conducive to deal making.
True. In addition, waking up in the suit can't help either.
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