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help me choose a bicycle - Page 2

post #16 of 26
FWIW, I have owned in the past and currently own another Trek and I really like them. The first lasted me a good decade. The new one has been around for 5 years or so so far. It doesn't get hard use, but it holds up. Nice components, though my saddle was stolen and I replaced it with a nicer one, nice design, etc.


bob
post #17 of 26
If you get one, please put lights and reflectors on it. Don't be one of those wannabe badasses who rides around with no safety stuff. Or I will have to yell and honk at you like I yell at them. They make it less safe for me on the road.

Also, use signals, don't fly through stop lights, and decide whether you're a vehicle or a pedestrian. And delay of 5 vehicles is illegal in this state.

Thanks.
post #18 of 26
I've got a Trek 1000 (few years older, USA-made model) which I think is a pretty decent value for the money.

Aluminum frame, Shimano components, seems like a well-made bike (but quality may have declined in the last few years).
post #19 of 26
I like this Trek: http://www2.trekbikes.com/bikes/bike...id=1037000&f=7 It uses the same material as my cross-country bike, which is pretty light (granted, it’s not carbon fiber), has disc breaks (which are really useful in real life situations), a carbon fork, and overall pretty good components. I generally like Cannondale, but the whole ‘proprietary head-tube’ nonsense is frustrating. Jon.
post #20 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by VersaceMan
I've got a Trek 1000 (few years older, USA-made model) which I think is a pretty decent value for the money.

Aluminum frame, Shimano components, seems like a well-made bike (but quality may have declined in the last few years).

Mine was made this year and it's been perfect so far. It's made in China however and not the US .

Jon.
post #21 of 26
Personally, i would recommend steel (reynolds 853 steel is what to look for i believe). The reason i prefer steel over aluminum and carbon, especially for a commuter is that it does the best job of absorbing the bumps and cracks along the road. Carbon is the worst, with aluminum in the middle. If your going with a steel based frame (hybrids exist with carbon forks, etc.), that usually means going with either Lemond or Bianchi. Obviously with steel your gaining some weight on the bike.

There's really nothing much that seperates a quality Giant, Trek, LeMond, Specialized, and Bianchi. Almost all use the same components (i.e. shimano or campgnolo). The most important thing is fit and comfort. Not all "similar" bikes (in terms of price and parts) from different manufacturers, and even within the same manufacturer, carry the same dimensions. One model may have 8 different sizes available, whereas another model may only have 6 different sizes available. Its highly recommended to find an informative bike shop that will help fit you in your proper size, and from there choose a bike from a particular manufacturer.
post #22 of 26
I agree about the steel frame assessment. However, you have to keep in mind that steel frames are prone to rust. So, a bit more maintenance is required. A titanium frame has the absorbent properties of a steel frame and the lightness of an aluminum frame, but obviously you'll have to pay more for that. If I were to win the lotto tomorrow, a MTB and a Road frame order will be placed promptly at Seven Cycles. They more or less are the Lobb and EG of the bike world.
post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkNWorn
If I were to win the lotto tomorrow, a MTB and a Road frame order will be placed promptly at Seven Cycles. They more or less are the Lobb and EG of the bike world.
Unless you want a bespoke bike… In which case make mine a http://www.nicolai.net/ or another custom bike from a small Co. with a Rohloff Speedhub 500/14 tranny http://www.rohloffusa.com Or maybe with this (A CVT bike tranny): http://www.fallbrooktech.com/NuVinci.asp Jon.
post #24 of 26
Thread Starter 
i've narrowed it down to the lemond tourmalet and the masi vincere. both are aluminum with shimano 105 components, and they're both under $1400. the masi looks to have a slightly more comfortable riding position but i'll have to test ride both to decide. thank you all for the advice. i've been taking notes. edit: i've chosen these 2 because they are made in the usa. the bianchis and specialized in my price range are made in china or taiwan. i left felt and trek off the list because i don't like their names.
post #25 of 26
nice. my cannondale was made in the USA, and was an important part of making my decision. it says "handmade in the USA", lol.

keep in mind when testriding bikes that tire pressure plays a big role in comfort. so when comparing, if possible, use the same (120psi) pressure in both bikes.
post #26 of 26
When people ask me what type of bike to get I almost always tell them "mountain bike". Why? Because you can ride a mountain bike on the road but try taking a road bike on of rocky mountain trail.
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