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How Critical Are Others of Your Style? - Page 14

post #196 of 250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post
Something like this? I have one and they are cool little guns. Most of the time I carry a customized 380 or one of these.

She has something like the second one. I'm gonna have to buy her that first one because I think it looks infinatly more badass....

acessorizing with guns...FUCK...I'm the girl in the relationship.
post #197 of 250
I work with youth and I once wore my 511's to work. My cousin used to work here as well and he told one of the kids that I wear my sisters pants, hence why they are "tight".

Now just about every kid asks why or why am I not wearing my sisters pants. Har har har...

I never get complimented on anything I wear until this past Saturday. I hung out with a buddy of mine and his two girl friends that I had just met. They told me that I dress better than most guys my age and really liked the way I looked. I was wearing a plain white vneck t-shirt with charcoal colored shorts and a pair of Onitsuka shoes that they really liked. They dug my Seiko watch as well (alligator strap). A very plain/simple look but it got the job done. Yay.
post #198 of 250
what a great thread
Quote:
Originally Posted by Makeshift_Robot View Post
Honestly, "fuck you" is a better comeback than 90% of everything, especially when you're saying it to someone you don't know. It shows that you disrespect them, but also that you don't care too much about them.
this is spot-on. I'm going to have to try this soon. Quieter than a yell but louder than normal speaking voice + huge scowl on face.
post #199 of 250
Some of my best mates aren't into style, (by which I mean they dress pretty hopelessly... LS graphic tshirts with thumb holes.... really?!) so yeah I get gay jokes from them all the time... bit less now cause they're used to me dressing in fitted/ occasionally effeminate stuff.

I'm in London a lot though, and was wearing a blue J+ Jacket with skinny chinos and got a lot of approving looks yesterday from passers by, even complimented on my style by one of the proffessors while looking around UEA uni

I'm not good looking by any means (though I scrub up well) so it's always amusing to see one or two well dressed ladies who can't take their eyes off you on the tube.
post #200 of 250
Quote:
Originally Posted by jet View Post
and you look like you have angelman syndrome
Wow, let's make fun of people using neurological disorders as insults! You guys are classy!
post #201 of 250
If somebody is trying to put you down about your clothing, why not just let them? If you know in your own mind you are dressed better than they are, why not let that be the biggest insult? Why give them the satisfaction of acknowledging their ignorance. I liked the chronos suggestion of just a shoulder shrug, I just wish that "jersey" would have as strong of a connotation in Canada as it would in the states. The only times I ever got comments I just played dumb, and tried to get them to repeat it to me over and over as if I didn't hear or understand. -haha you like all black? -huh? -all black, you seem to like black -i dont understand.. -do you like all black? -uh, what? huh? He didn't seem nearly as pleased with himself afterwards, but I guess that wouldn't work as well with the homophobic insults.
post #202 of 250
Quote:
Originally Posted by e0d9n0b5 View Post
If somebody is trying to put you down about your clothing, why not just let them? If you know in your own mind you are dressed better than they are, why not let that be the biggest insult? Why give them the satisfaction of acknowledging their ignorance. I liked the chronos suggestion of just a shoulder shrug, I just wish that "jersey" would have as strong of a connotation in Canada as it would in the states.

The only times I ever got comments I just played dumb, and tried to get them to repeat it to me over and over as if I didn't hear or understand.
-haha you like all black?
-huh?
-all black, you seem to like black
-i dont understand..
-do you like all black?
-uh, what? huh?

He didn't seem nearly as pleased with himself afterwards, but I guess that wouldn't work as well with the homophobic insults.

lame, should have told him you were going to his mama's funeral after you rammed her in the ass so hard without lube that her colon developed deep abrasions which resulted in untreated infection and later, death.
post #203 of 250
I wish I had some to share but they're mostly positive lol. It's good to live in a big city. Also, staying away from high concentrations where idiots gather helps.
post #204 of 250
They aren't. I get an occasional tight jeans comment but hey it's Seattle so people are used to it.
post #205 of 250
Quote:
Originally Posted by e0d9n0b5 View Post
-haha you like all black?
-huh?
-all black, you seem to like black
-i dont understand..
-do you like all black?
-uh, what? huh?

lolll
post #206 of 250
I usually don't hear much from my friends. There are comments every now and then about something or other, but I usually take it in stride, and it's generally not criticism - or, if it is, it's more like a playful jab about how I overdress or something. More often than not, though, I hear nothing; it's just generally excepted that I dress a certain way, and it's not anything outlandish, everything just fits well. I suppose the slimmer cut in my clothes might lead to more comments on how thin I am, but I've basically had the same body type for the past four or five years (I row competitively, which keeps me pretty lean), and it's the truth, besides, so I wouldn't call it criticism.

My female friends are usually more likely to comment if they like what I'm wearing, or they have a question about something, but I've discovered that, in general, girls know less about men's clothing than you'd think; it's usually like "That looks nice", followed by a question. I know it bothers some friends, since their girlfriends will comment on it in private, asking them to dress "more like Drew", which I guess is sort of an unintended consequence of caring about how you dress.

I guess I should say, people aren't critical, but they do notice after a while. I don't talk about it unless asked, though, so it's usually not something that's really brought up.
post #207 of 250
Quote:
Originally Posted by e0d9n0b5 View Post
-haha you like all black?
-huh?
-all black, you seem to like black
-i dont understand..
-do you like all black?
-uh, what? huh?

This is awesome.

I could see it working with being called gay too.
post #208 of 250
By the way, do people really get that much trouble about the way they dress from strangers/friends? I get the feeling that in those cases people probably aren't well dressed...
post #209 of 250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lel View Post
By the way, do people really get that much trouble about the way they dress from strangers/friends? I get the feeling that in those cases people probably aren't well dressed...
Well, it all depends, of course. At the core of it, it all boils down to; do people notice that you're dressed in a different way? And, if they do, are they going to criticize you for it? It depends on the standard dress where you live and the person who says something, honestly; I don't think you can really say someone is dressed poorly if your main criteria is how often someone says something. I hope you don't mine, Uncontrol, but I'm going to use you as an example. Some people probably think otherwise, but the guy clearly has a good idea of the look he's going for, and nails it consistently. It's not something I think I could pull off, or even most people could, but he does it, and does it well. Now, I'm making an assumption here, but I'd say that a look so distinctive has a much higher chance of being commented on; but does that mean he dresses poorly? It's a matter of opinion, of course, but my own answer would be "Absolutely not". He just has a very keen sense of personal style, and it stands out - which is what I think most of us here aim for, anyway. Anyway, the point is, when it comes to clothing, you have to sort of know the difference between good and bad criticism. It's entirely possible that some people deserved whatever criticism they've gotten, and have probably corrected it, if that's the case. But if some criticism, a suggestion, doesn't mesh with your own sense of style, then why should you change it? If someone stopped me during a regatta, and pulled up next to the boat and told me that I was running wrong, it'd be the same sort of thing (that might be a bad analogy). Everyone has their own sense of style, whether they know it or not, and are sometimes prone to applying the standards of their own style to others (especially those who will proclaim they don't have a style, while wearing the same sweats, tees, and tennis shoes as everyone else they know). It takes a while to realize that someone's Style should be judged based on execution of their intent, not some some standard of dress. (I see this a lot on SF, actually, where groupthink and conformity has a tendency to take priority.) tl;dr People who dress differently are going to receive more criticism, doesn't necessarily mean they dress "poorly".
post #210 of 250
At work yesterday: Coworker: "Nice gay shirt!" (from afar, commenting on a gray v-neck t) Me: "Nice gay shirt." Him: "Nice gay shirt." Me: "Nice gay shirt." Him: "That's an interesting shirt, very gay." (Closer) Me: "Why do you care about my clothes when you don't care about your own?" (followed by air punch and OOOH YEAH) Him: "well... really I like how it shows off your cleavage." Me: "Hey if you've got it, flaunt it. And if you don't got it, wear whatever the fuck it is you're wearing." *He leaves* Me: I WIN THIS ROUND, FRIEND.
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