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Crockett & Jones NYC - Lousy Experience - Page 9

post #121 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ich_Dien View Post

+1 Personally as an Englishman and an ex-Londoner I find the American retail approach far too much as well as phony. If I'm looking at you and smiling whilst standing next to something or holding it I need help, if I'm not leave me the hell alone! I don't care for all that 'how is your day, sir?' bollocks.

+1

I couldn't agree more. A little 'polite reserve' goes a very long distance for me.

And while I'm stirred up I'd like to mention that I really don't want to know my waiter's first name. Unless, of course it's an establishment I frequent.
post #122 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by swiego View Post

I look for salespeople who:
- are knowledgeable and articulate about their products
- have mastered the art of coming to me when I need help and staying away when I don't
- making me feel welcome and comfortable trying their products to decide what works best for me
- not afraid to point out options that work or don't work for me
- can surprise me with something they have that's even more to my taste than what I thought I had settled on.
It sounds like you enter a store knowing exactly what you want, and therefore primarily expect the sales people to run your card and put the merchandise in a big quickly and quietly. Sometimes that is the case for me too; at a grocery store, I really don't expect to have an entourage following me. However, if I enter a store selling $750 shoes with serious intent to get something but no clear idea exactly what I intend to get, I am going to expect more doting, because otherwise (if they don't help, or if they rush me) there's a chance I'll walk out with the wrong thing.

See, I was raised with the idea that if you want something done right do it yourself. Probably 99% of the time when I walk in a store I know more about the product than the sales person. Not only do I know more about the product, but I am confident they know nothing about me and my philosophy of style to have any authority to say what is best for me. I don't say it as a pompous person, just mere fact. By the time I walk into the store I know what I want and I would have to know that person fairly well before I trusted their opinion. I understand this isn't how everybody is, but maybe I just don't understand why anybody would walk into C&J clueless to their own style and product to begin with. Sure it happens, and style aside I don't see the need for overly courteous, fuddy-duddy behavior. If you need an ego boost, or somebody to make over you a shoe store probably isn't the answer.
post #123 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gdot View Post

+1
I couldn't agree more. A little 'polite reserve' goes a very long distance for me.
And while I'm stirred up I'd like to mention that I really don't want to know my waiter's first name. Unless, of course it's an establishment I frequent.

Many times the waiter's name is on the check at the top anyway. But then again if you need to curse at them before the bill it can be an issue. "Samantha, you fuck!" is much more endearing than just, "You, fuck!"
post #124 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Many times the waiter's name is on the check at the top anyway. But then again if you need to curse at them before the bill it can be an issue. "Samantha, you fuck!" is much more endearing than just, "You, fuck!"

Good Point!
post #125 of 145
If I go to one more casual dining establishment and the waitstaff person who is taking my order sits at the table to take my order--I'm going to go apeshit!
post #126 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patek View Post

If I go to one more casual dining establishment and the waitstaff person who is taking my order sits at the table to take my order--I'm going to go apeshit!

This hasn't happened to me in a long time. Probably the last time was in high school at Applebees or something. Which, btw is an awful, awful place.
post #127 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patek View Post

If I go to one more casual dining establishment and the waitstaff person who is taking my order sits at the table to take my order--I'm going to go apeshit!

crazy.gif
post #128 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

This hasn't happened to me in a long time. Probably the last time was in high school at Applebees or something. Which, btw is an awful, awful place.

Yes, the food sucks but has great entertainment value. I've only been to two Applebees, Dayton OH and Danvers MA, and was very amused by a guy wearing a Kleenex stuffed bra and jorts and redneck karaoke.
post #129 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patek View Post

If I go to one more casual dining establishment and the waitstaff person who is taking my order sits at the table to take my order--I'm going to go apeshit!

That has never happened to me before, but If a waiter did that at a restaurant when I was about to order, I think I would just get up and leave.

-LR
post #130 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patek View Post

If I go to one more casual dining establishment and the waitstaff person who is taking my order sits at the table to take my order--I'm going to go apeshit!

You'd really hate it at Hooters.
post #131 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gdot View Post

+1
I couldn't agree more. A little 'polite reserve' goes a very long distance for me.
And while I'm stirred up I'd like to mention that I really don't want to know my waiter's first name. Unless, of course it's an establishment I frequent.

Like so many cultural usages the "have a nice day" and its' derivatives habit is an import from California.
It's just synthetic friendliness. I grew up in New York. You rarely heard that kind of patter from the sales staff
at better stores thirty years ago.
post #132 of 145

I am always confidently aggressive and self assured with sales representatives, almost to the point where it may come across as rude. I feel that in most places, particularly high end, it makes for a more effective experience. If I'm ready to make a purchase or looking for something in particular, and notice that I'm not getting attention, I generally command rather than ask.. "do me a favor, get me.." rather than, "excuse me sir, when you get a chance could you.." Trust me, if one guy doesn't have the chance, he'll get somebody else to help you. Being assertive lets them know that you are a serious buyer and also puts you in control, so they are less likely to try to take advantage of you. If they see that you are a more intimidated shopper, they will either likely ignore you, or, if it's an aggressive sales consultant, try to push a purchase on you.

 

Now, after you develop a relationship with your sales consultant (usually this comes after you buy something smile.gif), then you don't need to be as aggressive anymore.. I am on a first name basis with my sales consultants, and know at least one in every boutique that I shop at..


Edited by newyorknoir - 7/18/12 at 4:13am
post #133 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by newyorknoir View Post

I am always confidently aggressive and self assured with sales representatives, almost to the point where it may come across as rude. I feel that in most places, particularly high end, where they are used to clients like this, it makes for a more effective experience. If I'm ready to make a purchase or looking for something in particular, and notice that I'm not getting attention, I generally command rather than ask.. "do me a favor, get me.." rather than, "excuse me sir, when you get a chance could you.." Trust me, if one guy doesn't have the chance, he'll get somebody else to help you, whether it's another sales consultant or an assistant manager. He won't take it personally, nor will he go home and cry about it.. Being assertive lets them know that you are a serious buyer and also puts you in control, so they are less likely to try to take advantage of you. If they see that you are a more intimidated shopper, they will either likely ignore you, or, if it's an aggressive sales consultant, try to push a purchase on you.

 

Now, after you develop a relationship with your sales consultant (usually this comes after you buy something smile.gif), then you don't need to be as aggressive anymore.. I am on a first name basis with my sales consultants, and know at least one in every boutique that I shop at.. Then it becomes a pleasurable experience, and I've had sales consultants who I've become rather friendly with.

"I feel that in most places, particularly high end, where they are used to clients like this,............"

 

You have no idea what you're talking about. We would never mistreat the servants or hired help and in fact try to make them feel like they are equals.

post #134 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snedley View Post

"I feel that in most places, particularly high end, where they are used to clients like this,............"

 

You have no idea what you're talking about. We would never mistreat the servants or hired help and in fact try to make them feel like they are equals.

 

rotflmao.gif

cheers.gif

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ich_Dien View Post


+1 Personally as an Englishman and an ex-Londoner I find the American retail approach far too much as well as phony. If I'm looking at you and smiling whilst standing next to something or holding it I need help, if I'm not leave me the hell alone! I don't care for all that 'how is your day, sir?' bollocks.

 

crackup[1].gif


Edited by newyorknoir - 6/27/12 at 8:45pm
post #135 of 145

The dedicated greeter seems to be standard these days, you cna safely politely ignore them, they are mostly indifferent to all customers anyway.  YMMV with SAs though, I had one ot those American Express moments this week, wandered in, dressed to be ignored, I did feel the condescending glances from the younger SAs and the snarky twinks that work the douchey brand sub boutiques like Tom Ford,  Ended up buying a Zegna SC from one of the older SAs who had seen me around in the past and knew I had bought in that department before.  The raised eyebrows from the younger ones made me laugh at the cash register.  I am used to that, only thing that really irks me is outright rude, which seems to be standard in NYC or London.  It works in that I know who NOT to buy from in these places.   

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