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Chest being let out? - Page 2

post #16 of 30
Thanks. I'll go back to being stubborn for a moment now. And a little pedantic, I suppose.

This is a regular coat pattern. a-b is the width of the chest. b-c is the width of the armscye, or diameter as I was taught.

The pink line indicates where you may, or may not, find inlay. Probably not, especially nowadays, and certainly not in RTW. What happens when you use that inlay is not a widening of the chest, but an increase in scye diameter. It may help ease of movement and comfort in the chest area, but it does not help at all to let out the chest.

If that is what you want/need, you will have to alter the pattern as per the red vertical line. This can only be done in the early stages of fitting, if at all. No maker, bespoke, RTW, MTM, household seamstress, will ever leave inlay where it is needed for this, which is at point b. Why? It would force the cloth towards the chest, because the arm pushes against it. It's umcomfortable, it's ugly, and it's not the way to make a coat. Or a shirt, or a dress, or anything else for that matter.

[IMG] Uploaded with ImageShack.us[/IMG]

There is no inlay cloth on the chest, so it cannot be let out.

Maybe your tailor told you it was possible, but worked different tricks to give you what you need. Fair enough. And compliments to him. But he didn't let out the chest.

Also: if someone can explain how to post an image off of my HD, I'll put that in. All I get is a upload from URL dialog box. No browse?? Bloody technology. Where's me thimble...

Edit: Sod it. Image up now courtesy of imageshag.
post #17 of 30
No replies.... did I break teh internet?
post #18 of 30
Cant you just let the back seam out between the shoulder blades?
post #19 of 30
Not really. It will cause a pocket, a surplus of cloth. It is only done for pronounced shoulder blades. The only reason to leave inlay there is for pattern manipulation during the fitting process. In any case, the OP asked about letting the chest out, which would not work anyway if done in the back.
post #20 of 30
I´ve been told that the fabric inside is cut in zigzag , so no fabric let.

But I am not a tailor.
post #21 of 30
Um.. no fabric let? I don't understand. Some makers do indeed cut with pinking shears, which gives the cloth a serrated edge. Personally, I don't. Also, I think I may have misunderstood the meaning of the OP. [IMG] Uploaded with ImageShack.us[/IMG] If the objective is to increase chest circumference, then yes, it is possible. For that, pretty much any tailor and some factories, leave inlay as per the blue line in the diagram. This also increases the armscye width, but it also adds ease of movement. My understanding was that the idea was to let out the actual breast section, or front panel (a to b in the draft). This remains impossible. Sorry for the confusion.
post #22 of 30
Perhaps the OP can point out where he needs the additional width?
Front or back? Does make the answer easier without causing further confusion (I hope)!

An older tailor colleague of mine used to stretch the front chest with the iron or even with his knee.
The success depends mostly on the fabric and the way the coat was constructed.

RTW companies lay out their patterns in the most effective way possible, they struggle for every cm. Because 1cm per garment saved means many meters when 10000 suits are cut. In order to save that 1cm they keep the inlays pretty small, 1cm seam allowance is the norm, so the most you could let out is 5mm on each side. And that is if the cloth/ fabric didn't fray or does not have any notches.
In that case it's a lost cause.

Letting out the seams at the front is pretty useless, the amount of extra width is not relevant and you can get the same result using the tricks I mentioned earlier.
Letting out the seam at the rear is causing a major alteration. The sleeves have to be widened and the lining both in sleeve and coat, too.
It creates more room for the arms, but front and back stay pretty much the same.
post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Stall View Post
Um.. no fabric let? I don't understand.

Some makers do indeed cut with pinking shears, which gives the cloth a serrated edge. Personally, I don't.

Also, I think I may have misunderstood the meaning of the OP.

[IMG] Uploaded with ImageShack.us[/IMG]

If the objective is to increase chest circumference, then yes, it is possible. For that, pretty much any tailor and some factories, leave inlay as per the blue line in the diagram. This also increases the armscye width, but it also adds ease of movement.

My understanding was that the idea was to let out the actual breast section, or front panel (a to b in the draft). This remains impossible.


Sorry for the confusion.



Typical tailor, argues with you like crazy and tries to make you understand something is not possible until you tell them how to do it.
post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post
Typical tailor, argues with you like crazy and tries to make you understand something is not possible until you tell them how to do it.

He's right though, you can't increase the width across the upper chest, you can only increase the circumference under the arm. I expect this will have the desired effect of making it fit looser around the chest, but the fit will not be as good as if the suit was made from scratch with a wider chest in mind.
post #25 of 30
Martin,

Thank you for the lucid explanation.

It is always nice to read a detailed reason as to whether something can or cannot be done. Diagrams are always appreciated too
post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post
Typical tailor, argues with you like crazy and tries to make you understand something is not possible until you tell them how to do it.



I think you may have misunderstood the fact that I had misunderstood. Did my apology for causing confusion also pass you by?

Do you also presume to tell your mechanic how to repair your car?

Sanguis, thank you. You're right about the fit, although the results can be rather satisfying.
post #27 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Stall View Post
I think you may have misunderstood the fact that I had misunderstood. Did my apology for causing confusion also pass you by? Do you also presume to tell your mechanic how to repair your car? Sanguis, thank you. You're right about the fit, although the results can be rather satisfying.
Shouldn't you be watching the football? Then again, so should I.
post #28 of 30
I'm afraid I have to admit that football is one of the things in this world about which I find it rather hard to care any less than I do.
post #29 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Stall View Post


I think you may have misunderstood the fact that I had misunderstood. Did my apology for causing confusion also pass you by?

Do you also presume to tell your mechanic how to repair your car?

Sanguis, thank you. You're right about the fit, although the results can be rather satisfying.

Well, I live in New York... I don't own a car. But if I did I would probably tell them where to let out the quarter panels.
post #30 of 30
Well played.

I hope they don't replace your hubcaps with buttons.

Also, don't ever tell your tailor to let out quarters, because that is just simply - oh, forget it.
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