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Fountain Pen - Page 5

post #61 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by rajesh06 View Post
Could you please elaborate? I have no expectations of Visconti.

Yes, that was a bit cryptic. Visconti offers great materials put together with good fit and precision. This is where they excel in my opinion. Nib consistency and filling systems have been their weak link.
post #62 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by KlezmerBlues View Post
Yes, that was a bit cryptic. Visconti offers great materials put together with good fit and precision. This is where they excel in my opinion. Nib consistency and filling systems have been their weak link.
But then, what do you get from a pen if the two main ingredients, nib (+ feed) and filling system (Visconti seems to be all too fond of c/c), are not to your liking?
post #63 of 100
I use this NOS Shaeffer with a dual filling system. It is amazing value for the money.
post #64 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sterling Gillette View Post
But then, what do you get from a pen if the two main ingredients, nib (+ feed) and filling system (Visconti seems to be all too fond of c/c), are not to your liking?

What is not to my liking may very well be to another persons liking. It really comes down to personal preference what importance one ascribes to the different parts of the pen, and my own preferences have changed somewhat over time.

That a pen manufacturer provides nibs with inconsistent quality does not mean there are no good nibs right from the box. But one should be wary of the fact and preferable test the pen before purchasing. When it comes to nib performance for me personally, I can adjust most nibs myself to write as intended. If I still do not like how it writes, I can have it reground by one of the nib meisters.

When it comes to filling system, some people prefer converters to other systems. I'm not one of them. I cannot judge whether Visconti is especially fond of converters, but judging from their catalogue I would not come to that conclusion. Visconti does offer converters, but only in their lower end tier. In other tiers they offer varying filling systems, like piston, double reservoir and vacuum power fillers. The Homo Sapiens utilizes the latter.

I would also like to point out that the materials used and how they fit together is not just for looks, but also adds function to the pen. I think the lava used in the Homo Sapiens is a great choice for some people who are used to heavier pens. The material is tough and essentially unbreakable, and adds considerable grip even for sweatier hands.

If the specifications of this pen matches your preferences, I think you would be quite happy with the pen.
post #65 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by KlezmerBlues View Post
What is not to my liking may very well be to another persons liking. It really comes down to personal preference what importance one ascribes to the different parts of the pen, and my own preferences have changed somewhat over time. That a pen manufacturer provides nibs with inconsistent quality does not mean there are no good nibs right from the box. But one should be wary of the fact and preferable test the pen before purchasing. When it comes to nib performance for me personally, I can adjust most nibs myself to write as intended. If I still do not like how it writes, I can have it reground by one of the nib meisters. When it comes to filling system, some people prefer converters to other systems. I’m not one of them. I cannot judge whether Visconti is especially fond of converters, but judging from their catalogue I would not come to that conclusion. Visconti does offer converters, but only in their lower end tier. In other tiers they offer varying filling systems, like piston, double reservoir and vacuum power fillers. The Homo Sapiens utilizes the latter. I would also like to point out that the materials used and how they fit together is not just for looks, but also adds function to the pen. I think the lava used in the Homo Sapiens is a great choice for some people who are used to heavier pens. The material is tough and essentially unbreakable, and adds considerable grip even for sweatier hands. If the specifications of this pen matches your preferences, I think you would be quite happy with the pen.
I spoke with the National Sales Manager for Coles of London (they are the distributor for Visconti) at the National Stationery Show in NYC this year, and he let me try out the Homo Sapiens. I can tell you for sure that you are correct about the weight and the grip, and on top of that, the flexible nib writes incredibly smoothly. Writing with that pen for the 2-3 minutes that I did has had me itching to get one ever since. Worlds of difference between the Homo Sapiens and the mostly mid range Lamy, Pelikan, and Aurora fountain pens that I usually use on a daily basis.
post #66 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Moo View Post
I use this NOS Shaeffer with a dual filling system. It is amazing value for the money.

Nice looking pen. I have a couple of 40s-50s Parkers and have been surprised how great these old pens can be given how cheaply they can be had.

Apart from the Parkers I am mostly using Sailor 1911s or a little Stipula which is easy to always keep on hand and never seems to run out of ink as it's a dropper-fill.




Quote:
Originally Posted by Usul View Post
First stop: fountain pens, next stop: sex with strangers in bathrooms

This is styleforvm, unusual behaviour in bathrooms is pretty much par for the course I believe.
post #67 of 100
^^^ How do you like your Sailor? I've been intrigued by them. Beautifully simple looking.
post #68 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
^^^ How do you like your Sailor? I've been intrigued by them. Beautifully simple looking.
Don't you have a Chinese lacquer S. T. Dupont? They look so sexy, but I can't justify that much on a pen.
post #69 of 100
The Sailor 1911 I've got has a Naginata nib, and writes very smoothly. The pen itself is light but well-balanced. I've heard people criticise them for being a little bland or soulless but I think that's unfair. They're simple in design as you say and don't really intrude in the writing process in the way a vintage pen might, but they do have their own character despite being fairly obviously influenced by the Montblanc 146.

I have another on order with their standard nib as well, so you can see I've been fairly happy with the 1911 I've got.
post #70 of 100
Excellent thread!

I am going to make the jump for the first time and go for the lamy safari. ON amazon, you can get it for $26 shipped with a Lamy FP Converter Refill - Safari Z24 from pen boutique ltd.

pen link: http://www.amazon.com/LAMY-SAFARI-FO...ef=pd_sbs_op_2

converter link: http://www.amazon.com/Lamy-FP-Conver...ef=pd_sbs_op_4

Are these good choices for a starter?

My next question is about the ink. I would like something that does not smudge and dries very fast. I was reading about radiograph ink and it's ultra fast drying properties. What do you guys think about it? What ink do you guys use in your pens?
post #71 of 100
GuP, I use a safari and think it is a good choice. I bought one ~18 months ago as my first fountain pen. Lost the first one and replaced it with another identical one. I use a medium nib, which I like, though it's a fairly thick line. I've never really had issues with smudging. Most inks dry quite quickly - just find a colour you like and don't worry.
post #72 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuP View Post
Excellent thread!

I am going to make the jump for the first time and go for the lamy safari. ON amazon, you can get it for $26 shipped with a Lamy FP Converter Refill - Safari Z24 from pen boutique ltd.

pen link: http://www.amazon.com/LAMY-SAFARI-FO...ef=pd_sbs_op_2

converter link: http://www.amazon.com/Lamy-FP-Conver...ef=pd_sbs_op_4

Are these good choices for a starter?

My next question is about the ink. I would like something that does not smudge and dries very fast. I was reading about radiograph ink and it's ultra fast drying properties. What do you guys think about it? What ink do you guys use in your pens?

Often times you will find that its actually the paper you use that contributes to how quickly the ink dries so that it doesnt smudge. I prefer Noodler's and Private Reserve inks, but again, depending on what paper I use them on, they have different dry times. Did you have a specific notebook you were planning on using it in?
post #73 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
^^^ How do you like your Sailor? I've been intrigued by them. Beautifully simple looking.

I just think this is worth quoting and great when taken out of context.
post #74 of 100
why not a pelikan 150 or 200 or even a vintage 140
post #75 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Law Guy View Post
why not a pelikan 150 or 200 or even a vintage 140

I think the Pelikan 150 is closer to his originally stated price range, you can get one for about $60ish...but the 200, or my favorite, the 215 series are fantastic pens for the money, although slightly more expensive.

Shameless plug: I did a review of the M215, <-- and it's one of my favorite everyday fountain pens...plus I managed to work in one of my favorite shirt and tie combinations in the pictures for that review.
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