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Things that are making you happy*******food and drink edition****** - Page 187

post #2791 of 3051
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

I think matts the only that doesnt like the french laundry

I don't dislike it, I have had a number of poor meals there. Some dishes are great, so it is not a surprise to me that meals can be awesome.
post #2792 of 3051
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

it's a challenging list, no doubt. and there are no inexpensive wines on it. but there are less-expensive wines that match well with the food. i think they keep the prices jacked for the bonus boys who come in and insist on having first growths ... on their expense accounts. pretty common practice in restaurants though few push the limits tfl and per se do (of course, few are able to ... nice thing about being booked solid two months in advance every day for the last 20 years).

the prices at PerSe seem to be jacked for anybody who wants to drink wines from France, Italy, USA, Australia, Germany, Austria, and South America.

I remember discussing this with you, then I got excited because I found a good wine at a good price that's very good with a variety of food. The Lapierre Morgon in magnum for just over $200. This is a great find.





... and then you ruined my excitement by reiterating that it was $200 for a mag of a new vintage Beaujolais.
post #2793 of 3051
FOODGUY GIVETH; FOODGUY TAKETH AWAY.
that's just how i roll.
post #2794 of 3051
Personally, I was more offended by the under-seasoned, 40 dollar slice of foie gras, and overcooked lamb and lobster. For a place that's been booked solid since it's inception, you'd think they'd have these things down pat by now.
post #2795 of 3051
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgm9128 View Post

Personally, I was more offended by the under-seasoned, 40 dollar slice of foie gras, and overcooked lamb and lobster. For a place that's been booked solid since it's inception, you'd think they'd have these things down pat by now.
at those prices, you have a right to expect more. but when you're cooking for more than 2 people, mistakes do happen.
post #2796 of 3051
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

at those prices, you have a right to expect more. but when you're cooking for more than 2 people, mistakes do happen.

True. Though the number of chefs in their kitchen certainly exceeds one, and the number of tables in the restaurant (16?) is by no means staggering.
post #2797 of 3051
The underseasoned foie gras has to be on purpose. It is always that way. I don't understand it.
post #2798 of 3051
I had the foie gras supplement at Per Se and it was maybe one of the best things I have ever eaten, so the experience definitely varies. I didn't feel it was underseasoned.

Gome hit the nail on the head. Clearly they are able to sell plenty of wine at those prices, and it is unquestionably a well chosen list and pairs very well with the food, it just feels insulting to pay that kind of money for bottle you can walk into Crush or Chambers St Wine any day of the week and buy. I'm not against paying a markup by any means--they chose, bought, and stored the wine, helped me pick a bottle, and I'm using their glassware and drinking it in their beautiful restaurant with their food, but at some point it just crosses a line.
post #2799 of 3051
Maybe you like your foie gras underseasoned.
post #2800 of 3051
Mmm, foie gras.
post #2801 of 3051
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

The underseasoned foie gras has to be on purpose. It is always that way. I don't understand it.

Probably to compensate for the DIY trillion year old rock salt you are supposed to sprinkle on it. Though finishing salt, no matter how ancient, won't make up for a lack of proper seasoning from the start.
post #2802 of 3051
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

Maybe you like your foie gras underseasoned.

Entirely possible!
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgm9128 View Post

Probably to compensate for the DIY trillion year old rock salt you are supposed to sprinkle on it. Though finishing salt, no matter how ancient, won't make up for a lack of proper seasoning from the start.

This is probably what it is.
post #2803 of 3051
A while back, Matt sent me the ratio of salt per kilo of liver for making terrines/torchons. Maybe foodguy can forward it to TK. biggrin.gif
post #2804 of 3051
i have never experienced the underseasoned torchon that has so irked so many. i do know that in my experience the torchon has always been accompanied by a wide range of seasoning salts that is part of the presentation ... it's one of those over-the-top jokey spins on luxury as far as i'm concerned. but of course the torchon is going to be under seasoned if the intent is to add salt after. you wouldn't want to salt perfectly seasoned torchon, would you?
post #2805 of 3051
Salt added at the end cannot have the same effect as salt added from the start. In my view, the torchon should be seasoned enough so you are getting all the "saveurs" from the foie gras. The addition of sea or volcanic lava salt would act both to enhance that perfect seasoning, and to add a pleasant texture. It wouldn't make it taste salty, because the torchon wouldn't be salty, and the added salt would just taste like salt on top of something seasoned correctly.
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