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Fish for people who don't eat fish - Page 4

post #46 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post
update: ate one grilled shrimp last night. Didn't taste too bad to be honest. Might have even enjoyed it, had it been dusted in some coriander powder before grilling and then some lemon juice afterwards.

Then, a couple hours later, I started itching all over and turned splotchy and red. I will try it one more time in a controlled environment and confirm if seafood is fucking me up.

Shellfish allergies are not the same as seafood allergies.
post #47 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
Tuna is very meat like.

I would agree with what is being called Chilean sea bass.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DNW View Post
Red snapper is a good middle fish, I think. It has [good] fishy characteristics, but not overwhelming to someone new to fish.

I agree with these. For those skittish about undercooking fish, sea bass and snapper are quite forgiving. I hate the way most well-done fish stick to your teeth while you are chewing them.

Poaching fish with lemon, bay leaves, and black pepper in the liquid do a great job of negating the fishiness. I also recommend getting a good Veracruz recipe for either of these fish, but it classically goes with snapper.
post #48 of 114
I have no idea what you don't like, but the "fishy" taste and smell in fish comes from the decomposition of the acids fish produce which allow them to live in an environment which would normally be inhospitable for living creatures. The obvious answer, if you don't want the fishiness, is to eat freshwater fish, since they do not produce the same compounds, or to eat very, very fresh fish, since the acids have not decomposed and still taste good. Other than that, scallops and shrimp for non fish seafood, and snapper for fish. Cook snapper with olive oil, capers, garlic and parsley with some lemon juice at the end, like they do in Italy, and you shouldn't have a problem.
post #49 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post
update: ate one grilled shrimp last night. Didn't taste too bad to be honest. Might have even enjoyed it, had it been dusted in some coriander powder before grilling and then some lemon juice afterwards.

Then, a couple hours later, I started itching all over and turned splotchy and red. I will try it one more time in a controlled environment and confirm if seafood is fucking me up.

What is it with lemon juice on fish and seafood?
post #50 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
What is it with lemon juice on fish and seafood?

To me, it's a great summery taste. I love roasting a whole fish with slices of lemon, cracked olives, bay leaves, salt, cracked pepper, thyme, and lots of olive oil. Leaving it uncovered is essential.
post #51 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by HORNS View Post
To me, it's a great summery taste. I love roasting a whole fish with slices of lemon, cracked olives, bay leaves, salt, cracked pepper, thyme, and lots of olive oil. Leaving it uncovered is essential.

If you haven't tried that, try stuffing it with some fennel, lemon, thyme, fennel seeds and drizzle some Pastis on both sides before roasting it
post #52 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by HORNS View Post
To me, it's a great summery taste. I love roasting a whole fish with slices of lemon, cracked olives, bay leaves, salt, cracked pepper, thyme, and lots of olive oil. Leaving it uncovered is essential.

That's not what I'm talking about. It seems there is a large number of people that will take the finished fish and drown it in lemon juice. It's like they're trying to cover the taste of the fish and replace it with lemon juice.
post #53 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
That's not what I'm talking about. It seems there is a large number of people that will take the finished fish and drown it in lemon juice. It's like they're trying to cover the taste of the fish and replace it with lemon juice.
Lemon juice has a fresh taste. Most fish, unfortunately, does not.
post #54 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
Lemon juice has a fresh taste. Most fish, unfortunately, does not.

Could be. The other night at dinner, someone at the table ordered red snapper and then asked for "a bunch" of lemon wedges and proceeded to drown the fish in lemon juice. It just got me to thinking of all the times I've seen people do that.
post #55 of 114
it also disguises the "off" smell in fish. remember the susan sarandon scene in "atlantic city"?
post #56 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
That's not what I'm talking about. It seems there is a large number of people that will take the finished fish and drown it in lemon juice. It's like they're trying to cover the taste of the fish and replace it with lemon juice.

Well, that's what I heard, and that's all that mattered!
post #57 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
Could be. The other night at dinner, someone at the table ordered red snapper and then asked for "a bunch" of lemon wedges and proceeded to drown the fish in lemon juice. It just got me to thinking of all the times I've seen people do that.

I don't like the taste of most fish - like matt mentioned, fresh water fish and very fresh fish I enjoy, but a lot I don't. on the other hand, I eat out so much I don't like to order red meat very much. so often I order fish that will be the "lesser evil" - I won't find it unpleasant. and I drown it in lemon
post #58 of 114
Going to cooking school and working with their fish was a revelation. Must have been out of the water less than 24 hours. Never, ever encountered a fishy smell and must have worked with at least a dozen different kinds of fish.
post #59 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Going to cooking school and working with their fish was a revelation. Must have been out of the water less than 24 hours. Never, ever encountered a fishy smell and must have worked with at least a dozen different kinds of fish.

In the past few months I've had some very fresh fish on differnt occasions - as in it was live the first time I saw it. loved it, it was actually sweet like fruit with an incredible texture. but that isn't what you get everywhere.
post #60 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Going to cooking school and working with their fish was a revelation. Must have been out of the water less than 24 hours. Never, ever encountered a fishy smell and must have worked with at least a dozen different kinds of fish.
This. The difference between extremely fresh fish and even day-old fish is remarkable. My guess is that the "fishy" smell comes from the oxidation/breakdown of the fatty acids in the fish when exposed to air. Those fatty acids (omega-3s) are essential to healthy brain function, so eat up.
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