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Fish for people who don't eat fish

post #1 of 114
Thread Starter 
Not sure why, but I never liked the taste and/or texture of fish. I'm trying to eat healthier so I want to start eating it. Specifically, cooked fish. Anyone have a recommendation for a type of fish that is most approachable for persons that don't like fish? Or maybe the best cooking method to make fish the most palatable for someone new to fish. I was assuming that I would grill or pan sear it.

As an aside, I should disclose that somehow, I enjoy sushi. However, I've never enjoyed making sushi at home, which is a shame because I have access to plenty of high quality sushi/sashimi at local Japanese markets.
post #2 of 114
Salmon was the first fish I could tolerate. You might also enjoy swordfish.
post #3 of 114
I like smoked salmon, crab cakes, fish sticks. I have slowly gotten to like simple broile fish, if it is very fresh
post #4 of 114
Scallops, if you're including shellfish.
post #5 of 114
anything "steaky", like Tuna or Swordfish, will have a texture that is easiest to acquire. grill them for just a few minutes, at the beginning don't leave them rare in the middle. and never do that with swordfish anyways.

after that you can graduate to cooking tuna that is left more rare, then to other fishes, etc
post #6 of 114
Probs start with grilled salmon or maybe tuna mixed with mayo. Those are pretty "non fish" textured foods.
post #7 of 114
I hate Fish..and I hate the smell..but I'm pretty big into working out and the nutritional benefits of Tuna are unrivaled. Here's what I do.

In a bowl mix together

-1 can of flaked tuna (drain the water)
-Few TBSP of Miracle whip (I use non-fat)
-Salt + Pepper
-Franks Red Hot
-Finely chopped green onion
-bit of lemon juice (masks the smell)

Then I just smear that mix over a couple pieces of bread, shred some low-fat cheese over it and toast it until it's all melted...then I toss on a tomato after..

mm
post #8 of 114
Can't understand why people are recommending fishes like salmon and tuna, which are relatively fatty and oily, and have fairly strong flavors. I'd be eating really bland white, flaky fish... like flounder or cod.
post #9 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas View Post
Can't understand why people are recommending fishes like salmon and tuna, which are relatively fatty and oily, and have fairly strong flavors.

I'd be eating really bland white, flaky fish... like flounder or cod.

+1, batter and fry it up and it's like eating a light fried chicken breast.
post #10 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post
+1, batter and fry it up and it's like eating a light fried chicken breast.

Defeats his "I'm trying to eat healthier" part, unfortunately.

OP, why dont you just eat chicken? You're never going to stick to a diet where you eat food that you hate.
post #11 of 114
I love fish, but salmon is one that is still taking me time to enjoy -- I can get a smaller portion (4-6ozs) but could not eat much more in one sitting -- powerful flavor and takes time to get used to.

I'd recommend Chilean sea bass
post #12 of 114
it's hard not to love smoked salmon.
post #13 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by robertorex View Post
it's hard not to love smoked salmon.

While I do enjoy smoked salmon, I disagree. I think it's pretty easy to dislike - the favor is very strong and it is quite oily. I can see people not enjoying it. In fact, I used to rather dislike it.
post #14 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cavalier View Post
I love fish, but salmon is one that is still taking me time to enjoy -- I can get a smaller portion (4-6ozs) but could not eat much more in one sitting -- powerful flavor and takes time to get used to.

I'd recommend Chilean sea bass

There are a number of different varieties of salmon, some oilier and stronger; others are very mild. I have two kids and they prefer Spring salmon (which is also called Chinook or King) over the very rich and oily sockeye. Spring is very mild and a pale colour. In the Fall, it's nearly white fleshed.

Other mild fish to consider are arctic char and rainbow trout.
post #15 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas View Post
Can't understand why people are recommending fishes like salmon and tuna, which are relatively fatty and oily, and have fairly strong flavors.

I'd be eating really bland white, flaky fish... like flounder or cod.

Exactly, salmon has such a distinct fish stench and has strong taste.

If you are just starting out with fish and want something light, what he said above, maybe some tilapila would be good for you.
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