or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › How to Dress Like a Man
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How to Dress Like a Man - Page 2

post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton
Does that not read like a trad manifesto?

A tradifesto, perhaps?
post #17 of 29
You guys have been unnecessarily harsh on this man and his article. My take on the article is that it was addressed to the typical American man that is constantly derided on this forum: wearing flip-flops to work, wears jacket sleeve too long and shirt sleeve too short, sports a pair of square-toe, corrected grain Kenneth Cole with rubber sole....etc. I do not agree with everything Mr. Tucker wrote, but to a beginner trying to turn away from dressing like a slob, the article is not bad. So get off your sartorial high-horses and cut the guy a break.
post #18 of 29
These are quite similar to the writings by P.J. O'Rourke in his book, Modern Manners: An Etiquette Book for Rude People in which he describes how to dress like a stereotypical rich person. Of course, O'Rourke does it as satire.

Modern Manners: An Etiquette Book for Rude People

I'm not going to transcribe right now, but I will attempt to summarize later.
post #19 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lee_44106
You guys have been unnecessarily harsh on this man and his article. My take on the article is that it was addressed to the typical American man that is constantly derided on this forum: wearing flip-flops to work, wears jacket sleeve too long and shirt sleeve too short, sports a pair of square-toe, corrected grain Kenneth Cole with rubber sole....etc. I do not agree with everything Mr. Tucker wrote, but to a beginner trying to turn away from dressing like a slob, the article is not bad. So get off your sartorial high-horses and cut the guy a break.

I think I agree with Lee--for all its faults (and I re-read the essay on the train last night after posting it; it has many faults), what would the critics say to Lee's proposition: The vast majority of people would still dress better following Mr. Tucker's advice than they would following their own muse? The fact that it contains errors, or that it has little to teach most of the people on these forums, should be set aside in answering that question.

There's a further question, of course, of whether this proposition, if accepted, would be enough to justify everything else about it. Discuss.

Here, by the way, is Tucker's "addendum," for those worried about EGs.

http://blog.lewrockwell.com/lewrw/archives/000746.html
post #20 of 29
Do I really need to say it? No short-sleeve "dress shirts" in public, ever! Also, do I really need to say this? Shirts are not supposed to be worn against the skin. Wear a T-shirt, please.

I'm pretty new, so this is a serious question. I thought nicer fabrics were all right to wear against the skin... just not oxfords...
post #21 of 29
Thread Starter 
Opinions vary around here. I'm a t-shirt kind of guy myself, but I would not express it as a commandment the way Tucker has (I would not express most things the way Tucker does). Especially with nicer fabrics, I'm inclined to protect them by wearing a t-shirt under them, but some people consider them either stuffy or constricting. YMMV.
post #22 of 29
This article has been posted before (either here on on AAAC). I have the same opinion now that I did then. The author might not have all of his facts straight, and he may present a fairly uninspired manner of dress overall, but this article is not aimed at the denizens of this board or of AAAC. It is aimed at the American male who has, at best, a passing interest in clothing, in an attempt to get the general male population to dress and look a little better.

I would guess that if everyone followed the advice in this article, there would be no more reason for the complaints often heard here and at AA about the horrific dress often seen in public.
post #23 of 29
Quote:
Q: Do you recommend tailor-made clothing? A: Not really. You can find good and bad off-the-rack suits and good and bad tailor-made suits. How many times have you had someone mess up your alterations? The risk of tailor-made suits is 100 times that of basic alterations.
WTF?
post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jovan
Quote:
Q: Do you recommend tailor-made clothing?
A: Not really. You can find good and bad off-the-rack suits and good and bad tailor-made suits. How many times have you had someone mess up your alterations? The risk of tailor-made suits is 100 times that of basic alterations.
WTF?
Are we going to have that Baron Boutique = bespoke argument again? Where did I put that smiley?

Ah, right here:

post #25 of 29
Although to be fair, I agree with you that a 100x increase in risk is rather exaggerated, even for the non-SF member who knows little to nothing about suit construction or fit. I think his adviced is targeted to the regular guy who needn't be told that bespoke is the only option for dressing like a man.
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoVaguy
at least he didn't go up 5.

you can check out the rest of his rants at:

http://www.lewrockwell.com/tucker/tucker-arch.html

I just went into court today (case dismissed I might add. Take that CHP) and of the two lawyers present one was wearing a green 4 button and the other a grey 3 button. Personally I think 4 buttons looks fine and I don't see any reason to harp on it other than it being uncommon. Sort of like how a DB suit is uncommon.
post #27 of 29
The article should have been titled:"How to Dress Like A Prole".
I see from the attached pic that he follows none of his prescribed "rules". A black jacket? Why
post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by dah328
Although to be fair, I agree with you that a 100x increase in risk is rather exaggerated, even for the non-SF member who knows little to nothing about suit construction or fit. I think his adviced is targeted to the regular guy who needn't be told that bespoke is the only option for dressing like a man.
No, the argument is not going to start again. But going bespoke should not be completely thrown out the window, especially if one has the money to do it and wants the best quality. A tailor like the respectable Thomas Mahon or Alan Flusser will likely make first time bespokers look pretty damn good, even if they don't want anything that fancy or special. The tailor will advise the person, educate them a bit, and help them make an informed decision.
post #29 of 29
I did not expect lewrockwell.com (one of my favorite sites) to be quoted here for style advice.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › How to Dress Like a Man