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Do you take your stuff to the cleaners or iron it yourself? - Page 4

post #46 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarllraC
Let me make sure I understand.

1) Toss shirts in washer.
2) Hang until they are just damp
3) Iron them

Is there a good beginner's guide to ironing anywhere? I can't seem to get the shirt to spread out teh way I want it, and parts like the shoulders and arms are very difficult. I have no problem with the collar, front, or back.

Well, except that flap of cloth that goes down the front on the side with the buttonholes.. I don't know what it's called, but it's about 2mm wide and it always folds itself in half and looks horrible.

Think what you will of Martha Stewart, she knows how to iron a shirt:

http://www.marthastewart.com/page.jh...id=channel1149
post #47 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdawson808
I know this is actually accurate advice, but I hate it. I can wash 8 shirts at once. There is little chance I will notice when they get to the point of being 'slightly damp' and no chance that the others won't have dried completely by the time I work my way through them one at a time.

I do my own most of the time (with a spray bottle in hand) and once in a while just take them to the cleaners when I'm not feeling like doing them myself.

b

Oh yeah, for my part, what I should have said was "dampen them before ironing". I don't even try to iron them when they're fresh out of the wash -- I iron them as I need them and use a spritz bottle.
post #48 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky Strike
I have a shirt laundry service as a perk at work, so I use that. The price is roughly equivalent to $2 per shirt, but I'm afraid they use one of those blow-up things, where they place the shirt on a torso-sized doll, and "blow it up" with steam, and then iron the collars and cuffs and do finishing touches by hand. It's hell on the buttons, and probably wears much harder on the shirts than hand-ironing, so I've started holding back a few favourite shirts to be ironed by self.
Why would your cleaner's steaming method cause any more wear and tear on the shirt than hand-ironing? It's not like steam is bad for either cotton or buttons.
post #49 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by dah328
Why would your cleaner's steaming method cause any more wear and tear on the shirt than hand-ironing? It's not like steam is bad for either cotton or buttons.
Well, they basically "blow up" the shirt like a ballon. There's quite a bit of pressure applied.
post #50 of 82
I see. I doubt the brief pressure on the buttons is all that bad for the shirt.

In either case, up until now, I've washed and ironed all my own shirts, but the ironing takes an inordinate amount of time. I will probably continue to wash all my own shirts, but I will probably take them to the cleaners to have them ironed despite the added wear and cost.
post #51 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by bch
Ironing a shirt is like shaving. It's a skill every man should have.

Don't use starch, use Magic Sizing made by Faultless. It's available at the grocery store.

Word.

Magic Sizing is some good stuff. Works like starch but without the starch. When I am up to it, I iron my own with Magic Sizing. I've been lucky enough to find a dry cleaner that does great shirt work. $1.25/shirt, very good ironing (they hand iron and use the damp method), and in 3 years they've yet to loose or crack a MOP button. I still wash them myself (tide powder, front loader, hand wash cycle) before I take the shirts there as I like to "Shout" my collars, cuffs and I like to be 100% certain that there are no stains on the shirt pre-ironing because once they iron a stain.....
post #52 of 82
For pants I steam and touch up with an iron between wearings, but eventually then take them to the cleaners for a really good clean and press.

I always do my own shirts. I don't want a commercial laundry beating my shirts to death. I used to have them do my cheaper ones, but no more. Even my cheap ones are an investment.

I can wear a shirt twice if I steam it between wearings then touch it up with the iron. After the second wearing I presoak, hand wash, then use the "spin" cycle on my washer to get the last soap residue and excess water out--don't have to twist, and gets more water out than just squeezing.

I don't use a dryer, but instead line dry-- easy to do year round since I set up a clothes rack in my unused bathtub (I guess I better explain that I have a separate shower stall that I DO use).

I always iron them myself--I will not let my wife or daughters touch my clothes with an iron. (This is the only time I ever got my way without a fight!) If I don't iron the item when damp, I use Magic sizing. Works way better than a spray bottle to release dried-in wrinkles.

As with any job, having the right tools makes all the difference. A really good iron and a high quality ironing board is a must. I use a Rowenta Professional iron, cost $100.00 at Wal Mart. If I ever get a house with more floor space, or when enough kids move out, I'll get a table top steam press.

Sounds a little (or maybe even a lot) lame, but I enjoy the simple task of ironing--its like a form of meditation.
post #53 of 82
Everyone has an opinon on this matter, however if you want to maintain the life of your shirts try taking them to a Premium dry cleaners and ask them to launder the shirts and press them without starch. I don't know if have fused collars and cuffs or hand sewn interlinings(swiss interlinings) inside your collar and cuffs. The chemicals in the starch combined with the heat begin to breakdown the collars and cuffs and you may end up tossing a perfectly good shirt into the trash if not careful.
post #54 of 82
I have ironed my shirts all my life. I have, on occassion, used a commercial launderer but that was when I was traveling. I also iron in the same sequence a vintage gent except I do the back section before I do the front panels.
I'm not prone to ironing damp in fear of scorcing the fabric which can occur if the iron is to hot and the fabric to wet. I wash all my shirts with socks in cold water on a delicate setting and hang to dry. I've used all the canned sprays like Magic Sizing but found in the end they became very expensive in the long run. I know there have been conflicting opinions on starch but I have to admit, my shirts last for years with my method.
I use LINIT It comes in a half gallon bottle and is concentrated. I mix my solution in a spray bottle very diluted (experimented with proportions untill I came to the right finish with no stach residue) and always present a very finished effect with quick results. It takes me approximately 10 minutes to iron the easiest fabrics.
I'm not going to say that that this is the only method but I'm in the menswear business and my shirts always look as though they just came out of the package.


Best Regards,

Gary
post #55 of 82
Where's LINIT available? I'd like to try it.
post #56 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by yachtie
Where's LINIT available? I'd like to try it.
At your local supermarket, in the laundry soap section. Usually right next to Magic Sizing. Gary
post #57 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by von Rothbart
I iron Kiton, Borrelli & Finamore myself anything below that I send them to the cleaner. I hate ironing.



I use Corby (sp?) pant press. I highly recommend it.

Yet another happy Corby user -- for several years now. [BTW, recently picked up a Corby tie press on ebay. Pretty much worthless... ]

I simply don't have the time to iron my own shirts. When I'm in NYC, my best shirts go to Hallak (the rest go to the much cheaper valet service that the building I live in provides).

Shoes, though, are another matter -- that I insist on doing myself.
post #58 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnoldh
Does anyone else out there in SFland get more than one wearing of a shirt per cleaning?

I live in northern Ontario with its two seasons -- winter and July -- so it's not hard for me to get two wearings out of a shirt. During summer (particularly this year), though, it's once and then cleaned.

Responding to the original question, I wash and iron my shirts and send my suits, sport coats and pants off to the cleaners.
post #59 of 82
Maybe I'm not working hard enough, but I live in Houston and I get 2 wearings out of a shirt easily. Then again I wear an undershirt. With the AC in my building the only humidity I face is the 30 yard walk to the car in the morning and the 30 yard walk from the car to the elevator in the parking garage, then the same coming home. Other than that I'm nice and cool inside the building.
post #60 of 82
$1.25 a shirt in Manhattan, hand-ironed? where is this place?

Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel
Word.

Magic Sizing is some good stuff. Works like starch but without the starch. When I am up to it, I iron my own with Magic Sizing. I've been lucky enough to find a dry cleaner that does great shirt work. $1.25/shirt, very good ironing (they hand iron and use the damp method), and in 3 years they've yet to loose or crack a MOP button. I still wash them myself (tide powder, front loader, hand wash cycle) before I take the shirts there as I like to "Shout" my collars, cuffs and I like to be 100% certain that there are no stains on the shirt pre-ironing because once they iron a stain.....
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