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Custom shirts - Page 3

post #31 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
If you don't know how the cloth responds to shrinkage, get an additional 1/4 yard or so. The shirtmaker will then wash the cloth a couple of times before cutting. That will suck most of the shrinkage out.
This sounds like a winner. Thanks! On a somewhat related note...anyone have a source for discounted shirt fabric in Naples?
post #32 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
If you don't know how the cloth responds to shrinkage, get an additional 1/4 yard or so. The shirtmaker will then wash the cloth a couple of times before cutting. That will suck most of the shrinkage out.

If I were to ever get bespoke shirts, I would take the cloth and wash and dry it at home as I would normally do with finished garments to shrink it to the point where it won't shrink anymore during its life as a finished garment, then give the cloth back to tailor for cutting.

Jon.
post #33 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiger02 View Post
This sounds like a winner. Thanks! On a somewhat related note...anyone have a source for discounted shirt fabric in Naples?
which shirtmaker are you going to? and no, I don't know of any fabric discounters, but in general you pay less from the shirtmakers anyway.
post #34 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
which shirtmaker are you going to? and no, I don't know of any fabric discounters, but in general you pay less from the shirtmakers anyway.
Not ready to take that step yet, still paying for for the suits and pants. There's a shirtmaker in Budapest who supposedly does good work who I will go see tomorrow. Leave for Naples Friday.
post #35 of 58
For discount fabrics you should head to the areas where the fabrics are processed. I think that some of the makers sell to the public. In Naples I would imagine that you are more likely to get ripped off on something like that than to actually get a good deal.
post #36 of 58
Tom, I'm not sure what you're intending on using, but it's really worth going with the better fabrics.

For my first shirt, which was intended as disposable because I needed it fast and my pattern wasn't quite perfect, we used my shirt makers' lesser offerings (some italian company, not sure which) and it shrunk quite a bit.

The shrinkage of the alumo stuff on the other hand is negligable.
post #37 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
For discount fabrics you should head to the areas where the fabrics are processed. I think that some of the makers sell to the public. In Naples I would imagine that you are more likely to get ripped off on something like that than to actually get a good deal.
You're probably right. What I was hoping for was something along the lines of Tip Top in the US, but with Riva end bolts and the like. I have a ton of free time while I'm there so will go looking.
post #38 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS View Post
If I were to ever get bespoke shirts, I would take the cloth and wash and dry it at home as I would normally do with finished garments to shrink it to the point where it won't shrink anymore during its life as a finished garment, then give the cloth back to tailor for cutting.

This can be tricky because the interlining shrinks as well. A good method used by many shirtmakers is to make one shirt, and have you live with it for a few weeks following your normal laundering routines. After that, they check the fit and make any necessary adjustments to the pattern and shirt.

--Andre
post #39 of 58
How much fabric is needed for a shirt?
post #40 of 58
Two yards for the average guy, of 60" goods. 3.5 of 36" goods. More if you are tall, fat, muscular, if the cloth has a pattern that needs to be matched, or if the shirtmaker feels skittish with only two yards. 2.5 will get almost anyone a shirt from any maker. I'm 6'4" and my shirtmaker likes to get 2.25, whether solid, striped or plaid.
post #41 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
I'm 6'4" and my shirtmaker likes to get 2.25, whether solid, striped or plaid.

Are you really? I would have never imagined.

Jon.
post #42 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Two yards for the average guy, of 60" goods. 3.5 of 36" goods. More if you are tall, fat, muscular, if the cloth has a pattern that needs to be matched, or if the shirtmaker feels skittish with only two yards. 2.5 will get almost anyone a shirt from any maker. I'm 6'4" and my shirtmaker likes to get 2.25, whether solid, striped or plaid.

Also, I'd imagine you would want more than 2 if you're getting french cuffs or pockets.
post #43 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by chorse123 View Post
Also, I'd imagine you would want more than 2 if you're getting french cuffs or pockets.

Pockets? 'shudder'

Jon.
post #44 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by chorse123 View Post
Also, I'd imagine you would want more than 2 if you're getting french cuffs or pockets.

I think it's best to ask your shirtmaker first, but having said that, mine specifies similar numbers to Manton's no matter what options I'm getting. Once when he mistakenly put on button cuffs instead of FCs, he had enough fabric left over to redo it. Perhaps it depends on the geometry of the rest of your body. FWIW, I'm 6 ft, 165 lbs.

--Andre
post #45 of 58
Yeah, cuffs are not a big deal because on 60" goods they can be cut from almost anywhere. A good pattern maker can squeez collars and cuffs out of the cloth in the margins. The real problem is the length of the fronts and the back, which is why the wearer's height is the most important factor.
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