or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › General › General Chat › Dual Passport Holders
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Dual Passport Holders - Page 4

post #46 of 76
I was born in Canada and Naturalized in the US. I carry two passports, but mainly use my Canadian. Once, flying back from backpacking around Europe I was flying into the US and my American passport was nearly in tatters. In a moment of stupidty I handed over my Canadian (figuring Canadians dont need a visa to get into the US).

Bad move.

I had to spend 30 minutes explaining myself to an immigration officer who seemed only able to say "I do NOT recognize that you are anything but an American".

Dumbass mistake, luckily nothing worse happened.

K
post #47 of 76
Four ... and I keep each passport separately.

These days I travel with the passport that is likely to give me the least amount of trouble should I encounter a difficult situation.
post #48 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post
as of next year, I will have dual citizenship - in the US and in Korea. My mother and sister hold US and Australian passports due to my sister's birth there. I wouldn't mind having a third passport, in Japan or something.

Assuming that you are male and between the age of 18 to 35, how do you plan to avoid ROK military service?

http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_p.../cis_1018.html
post #49 of 76
to anyone that has canadian/us and lives as a canadian, is there any weird loopholes i need to be concerned about before i apply? like if america has a draft am i going to be conscripted, or do i get off on that (or have the option to renounce the dual citizenship at that point?) what are the biggest advantages and disadvantages you've experienced (aside from border hassling i suppose)? thanks for any replies. trying to get some real world feedback on this before i commit.
post #50 of 76
You mean weird loopholes other than the fact that you owe taxes abroad no matter where you go and that yes, you could be drafted?
post #51 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post
You mean weird loopholes other than the fact that you owe taxes abroad no matter where you go and that yes, you could be drafted?

well, mostly those ones i suppose.

by taxes do you mean on anything i earn while living away from canada/us? even if i'm just visiting?
post #52 of 76
I meant to get my British/EU one years ago, but the price has gone up so much, like $400. My siblings hold dual passports, but are US citizens and only have the UK ones for EU work purposes.
post #53 of 76
i have 2 also. i hate the holders that look like menu's want something smaller to hold my passports only.
post #54 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by zeeth View Post
to anyone that has canadian/us and lives as a canadian, is there any weird loopholes i need to be concerned about before i apply? like if america has a draft am i going to be conscripted, or do i get off on that (or have the option to renounce the dual citizenship at that point?)

what are the biggest advantages and disadvantages you've experienced (aside from border hassling i suppose)?

thanks for any replies. trying to get some real world feedback on this before i commit.

First of all, "conscription?" Really?

Secondly, if you live in the US and are the right age, you should have already registered with Selective Services. Even when I was over 25 and going to grad school in the US, I had to show proof of Selective Services registration. You can get drafted whether you are a citizen or just a legal, permanent resident is what I learned.
post #55 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post
as of next year, I will have dual citizenship - in the US and in Korea. My mother and sister hold US and Australian passports due to my sister's birth there. I wouldn't mind having a third passport, in Japan or something.

yeah, good luck with that one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ruben View Post
I meant to get my British/EU one years ago, but the price has gone up so much, like $400.

My siblings hold dual passports, but are US citizens and only have the UK ones for EU work purposes.

EU citizenship opens up a ton of possibilities in terms of working in Europe without having to get work authorization. I'd say that's worth a lot more than just $400.

In general, I'd like to add: having a passport doesn't mean you have the citizenship.
Especially wrt Norway/Germany, they'll let you keep your dual/triple citizenship until a certain age (if you have dual citizenship through your parents), but then you have to decide. There are exemptions to this but you have to apply to get them.
So you may hold a passport for a country, eg Germany, but it may not consider you a citizen due to your having another citizenship. In this case, you cannot rely on having all rights of a German/EU citizen should you get into trouble abroad, and if you use your German passport to travel, you are basically entering a country with an invalid or even falsified travel document. that could mean all kinds of fun...
post #56 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by VKK3450 View Post
I was born in Canada and Naturalized in the US. I carry two passports, but mainly use my Canadian. Once, flying back from backpacking around Europe I was flying into the US and my American passport was nearly in tatters. In a moment of stupidty I handed over my Canadian (figuring Canadians dont need a visa to get into the US).

Bad move.

I had to spend 30 minutes explaining myself to an immigration officer who seemed only able to say "I do NOT recognize that you are anything but an American".

Dumbass mistake, luckily nothing worse happened.

K
Damn, that sucks..

How'd they know you were a dual citizen? I've entered into the US before on my Canadian passport, and nothing happened.
post #57 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by zeeth View Post
to anyone that has canadian/us and lives as a canadian, is there any weird loopholes i need to be concerned about before i apply? like if america has a draft am i going to be conscripted, or do i get off on that (or have the option to renounce the dual citizenship at that point?) what are the biggest advantages and disadvantages you've experienced (aside from border hassling i suppose)? thanks for any replies. trying to get some real world feedback on this before i commit.
Be aware that Americans are responsible for taxation on worldwide income, and it remains that way for 10 years after you renounce your citizenship. So if you move to Canada and renounce your US citizenship, you're still paying taxes to the IRS for 10 years, despite benefiting from no services. Ability to work in both countries is helpful. Don't worry about conscription. There's not going to be a draft, if there is, you likely won't be selected, and if you're selected, you can always dodge the draft. I definitely wouldn't go overseas to die in the service of some corporation.
post #58 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by red120 View Post
Damn, that sucks..

How'd they know you were a dual citizen? I've entered into the US before on my Canadian passport, and nothing happened.

My dumbass blabbed when they asked me why I was visiting the US. I said "going home"...

K
post #59 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustinW View Post
Not a problem, but it will cost you an extra 30 mins in the immigration office while the pissed-off officer fills-out additional paperwork and makes a gazillion extra copies of your documents. I won't make that mistake again at Australian Immigration!

That's odd, I often leave the UK on a British passport and enter Australia on an Australian one, then travel back likewise. Australian citizens are specifically forbidden from entering Australia on a foreign passport I believe. The Poms don't really seem to care much, they glimpse the cover of the passport and just wave you through.
post #60 of 76
yikes
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Chat
Styleforum › Forums › General › General Chat › Dual Passport Holders