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Official Golf Thread - Page 10

post #136 of 1935
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark from Plano View Post

THIS IS HORRIBLE ADVICE FOR ANY ADULT LEARNING TO PLAY THE GAME AND WILL DO NOTHING BUT SCREW YOU UP. However, if you're looking for the reason why pros generate more distance, it's simple physics of force. They have trained themselves to make a really hard swing at the ball, smoothly and efficiently. Paradoxically, the best way for most people to increase clubhead speed over time is to focus not on clubhead speed, but on a smooth and efficient swing that stays on a simple plane. If you eliminate elements of the swing that are inefficient, you actually increase the force, without increasing the effort and you do so on a plane that keeps it in control as well.



It is generally assumed that 1 mph of swing speed increase = 1.5mph of ball velocity increase = 2.5-3 yards of carry distance increase. I think TW swings about 125-130 and a long-drive competitor around low 140s.

Not sure how fast Happy Gilmore's SS was.
post #137 of 1935
Thread Starter 
I will be happy to master my swing so I can start increasing head speed. Trying to hit too hard is still my #1 fault and I have the feeling, will be my constant nemesis in this game.
post #138 of 1935
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
I will be happy to master my swing so I can start increasing head speed. Trying to hit too hard is still my #1 fault and I have the feeling, will be my constant nemesis in this game.

YES! For most players and 100% of beginning players, the best thing is to accept the paradox that to achieve distance you must forget about trying to hit it long and instead focus on hitting it smoothly. Every time you focus on "long" you increase muscle tension which will eff up your swing efficiency. Even if you achieve a 150mph swing speed, if you can't deliver the clubhead squarely to the ball it won't matter.
post #139 of 1935
All things equal, the easiest way to gain distance w/o trying to swing harder is by increasing shoulder turn and increasing the width/arc of your swing. See DLII and TW for example.

Here's an excerpt from an '87 SI article on DLII when he was leading the tour in driving:

In fact, the sheer size of Love's swing is the biggest reason he hits the ball so far. On the practice tee, Love's swing stands out like a windmill among a bunch of electric fans"”it's wider and taller than anyone else's. Love's club head goes faster for much the same reasons a rock on the end of a long string will travel faster than one on the end of a shorter string. Without grunting and groaning, he produces the same kind of long-limbed power that marks Carl Lewis in full stride.
"It's a swing that is powerful and pretty at the same time," says the noted aesthete Ben Crenshaw. "Davis is sort of testing the outer limits. How big an arc can you have? How fast can you swing? It's fun to watch him."
post #140 of 1935
Love golf, I just never have a chance to play anymore.
post #141 of 1935
Thread Starter 
I will be getting one of these in July or August, when I actually start hitting the course:

http://www.bushnellgolf.com/laser/tourv2_se.cfm

Wrote an Excel macro to go with this. I figure Mrs. Piob and I can use the range finder to keep notes of how far we hit which club. This will be random data in a little flip notebook. So we'll keep our raw, random data on one worksheet and just keep adding on to the end of it after each game. Then, when the latest data is entered, copy and paste into a second sheet and run my macro. It will sort per club, in descending order of clubs, and at the end of data for each club give the summary average distance with that club.

Is that slick or what?
post #142 of 1935
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
I will be getting one of these in July or August, when I actually start hitting the course:

http://www.bushnellgolf.com/laser/tourv2_se.cfm

Wrote an Excel macro to go with this. I figure Mrs. Piob and I can use the range finder to keep notes of how far we hit which club. This will be random data in a little flip notebook. So we'll keep our raw, random data on one worksheet and just keep adding on to the end of it after each game. Then, when the latest data is entered, copy and paste into a second sheet and run my macro. It will sort per club, in descending order of clubs, and at the end of data for each club give the summary average distance with that club.

Is that slick or what?


I thought this rangefinder had the ability to load individual club distances into it. Basically when it tells you your distance to the target, it will also tell you which club to hit.
post #143 of 1935
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pscolari View Post
I thought this rangefinder had the ability to load individual club distances into it. Basically when it tells you your distance to the target, it will also tell you which club to hit.

But that has to be just a general recommendation, right? Or does it have the ability for me to enter my actual performance, per club?
post #144 of 1935
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
I will be getting one of these in July or August, when I actually start hitting the course:

http://www.bushnellgolf.com/laser/tourv2_se.cfm

Wrote an Excel macro to go with this. I figure Mrs. Piob and I can use the range finder to keep notes of how far we hit which club. This will be random data in a little flip notebook. So we'll keep our raw, random data on one worksheet and just keep adding on to the end of it after each game. Then, when the latest data is entered, copy and paste into a second sheet and run my macro. It will sort per club, in descending order of clubs, and at the end of data for each club give the summary average distance with that club.

Is that slick or what?

Too complicated for my worldview. I just look for a yardage marker, check the flag color, check the wind, and take a good guess. Last few times I played, I didn't bother pacing off a distance, either.
post #145 of 1935
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas View Post
Too complicated for my worldview. I just look for a yardage marker, check the flag color, check the wind, and take a good guess. Last few times I played, I didn't bother pacing off a distance, either.

It'll remove the need to pace off distance from the tee. Just walk to the ball and target the tee box markers. You'll know just how far you teed off.

Don't forget, Mrs. Piob is an engineer and I'm pretty analytical about things. Couple that with the fact we're both techno-gadget geeks, and this if part of the fun for us.

Won't have to do this for long or all the time. I figure 3-4 rounds when we start, do it again at the end of our first season. Other than that, just use the rangefinder as normal.
post #146 of 1935
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
But that has to be just a general recommendation, right? Or does it have the ability for me to enter my actual performance, per club?

I think you can enter the actual distances you hit your clubs.
post #147 of 1935
that sounds all fine and dandy but i'd be willing to bet the first few times on an actual course is going to be nightmarish. it is for everyone. hell, the first round of a season for most people is usually deplorable, let alone your first time ever.
post #148 of 1935
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdeuce22 View Post
that sounds all fine and dandy but i'd be willing to bet the first few times on an actual course is going to be nightmarish. it is for everyone. hell, the first round of a season for most people is usually deplorable, let alone your first time ever.

You're probably correct. I can still take measurements for decent shots and/or get through the first nightmare rounds then get some readings on our per club distance.
post #149 of 1935
try to go on a crappy day or find a course that isn't busy and play a few balls from where your tee shot lands. maybe throw one ball 10 yards up, one 10 yards back, etc. gives you a better feel of your club distances since at the range you are not taking subtle elevation changes, differences in your lie (ball in a divot, ball above your feet, ball below your feet, side hill lie, etc.) i did this a lot to start and it helped with club selection and just simply more practice in a real golf environment.
post #150 of 1935
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdeuce22 View Post
try to go on a crappy day or find a course that isn't busy and play a few balls from where your tee shot lands. maybe throw one ball 10 yards up, one 10 yards back, etc. gives you a better feel of your club distances since at the range you are not taking subtle elevation changes, differences in your lie (ball in a divot, ball above your feet, ball below your feet, side hill lie, etc.)

i did this a lot to start and it helped with club selection and just simply more practice in a real golf environment.

Great ideas. Yes, we were talking to a couple last night that are pretty avid golfers. They've got two courses they know that are pretty much empty every time they go. We'll probably make our first foray on one of these courses with them.
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