or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Constructing 'spalla camicia' - is it advisable to do it with non-Neapolitan tailors?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Constructing 'spalla camicia' - is it advisable to do it with non-Neapolitan tailors? - Page 2

post #16 of 31
As a related question, what's the difference between a giacca camicia and a spalla camicia? Is there a difference at all? I seem to recall a long-ago discussion Manton had with Giona Grata (sp?) where it was referred to as a giacca camicia meaning "shirt shoulder". Just curious. Thanks!
post #17 of 31
Giaca camicia = shirt jacket. Spalla camicia = shirt shoulder. Basically, with the former, the whole thing is cut and sewn like a shirt. With later, only the shoulder is; the rest is cut and sewn like a tailored jacket.
post #18 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton
Giaca camicia = shirt jacket. Spalla camicia = shirt shoulder. Basically, with the former, the whole thing is cut and sewn like a shirt. With later, only the shoulder is; the rest is cut and sewn like a tailored jacket.

Ah. Excellent. Thank you for that explanation.
post #19 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by EL72
Being in Toronto as well, I am curious about which tailor you are referring to. Care to share this info?

I third this sentiment. Care to share FCS?
post #20 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by FCS
So I am commissioning a suit with this tailor for the first time. While I believe that he is capable of producing high-quality hand-made products, his pedigree is not Neapolitan and I'm interested to get a suit with some Neapolitan traits, especially having the spalla camicia shoulder. Would it be prudent to try that? For whatever it's worth, he's used to apprentice under Caraceni in Milan a long, long time ago and his 'house style' is more toward soft-tailoring, although definitely not as soft as the 'classical' Neapolitan's.

To avoid confusion, I'm using the term spalla camicia as explained by this article from Manton:
http://www.askandyaboutclothes.com/T...anShoulder.htm

I'm curious as to what his name is. I assume he's in Toronto?
post #21 of 31
Common FCS,
give us some 411 on this "master" tailor's info please.

Thanks.
post #22 of 31
Thread Starter 
Gentlemen, I just messaged you his contact info. Truly sorry for the delay in responding, I was quite swamped with works recently.
post #23 of 31
Why does this seem like the beginning of a painful first coming of age bespoke story--version 7666.3? IF you want Napoli, then get Napoli. No subs allowed.
post #24 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by FCS
Yes, I have one, albeit a RTW jacket. And it is slightly roped as well.

I spalla camicia should never be roped, as I understand the term, because the whole point of a spalla camicia is to flatten out any roping by stitching the shoulder seam up against the shoulder side of the seam (on the inside, if you know what I mean).

That is, a roped spalla camicia, while perhaps possible, would be a total waste of time, effort and money. Are we all sure we're using the term in the same way in this discussion?
post #25 of 31
Roping occurs on the sleeve side of the seam, not the shoulder side, where the shirt stitching is done.

--Andre
post #26 of 31
grimslade is right: a true SC has no roping. In fact, I don't see how it could, given the way it is made.
post #27 of 31
Perhaps it's not so much roping but the puff of the sleevehead that resembles roping?

--Andre
post #28 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andre Yew
Perhaps it's not so much roping but the puff of the sleevehead that resembles roping?

--Andre
No, that is achieved with an open seam. The whole point of the SC is to remove any possibility of a puff.
post #29 of 31
Is Bruno Lepore the tailor being discussed?
post #30 of 31
bump
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Constructing 'spalla camicia' - is it advisable to do it with non-Neapolitan tailors?