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Shirt collar and cuff interfacing

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
What is used in high end (i.e. Charvet, T&A...) shirts for cuff and collar interfacing? Is it just folds of the shirts own fabric, or is it one piece of canvas sewn in? What makes one shirt collar & cuff keep its ridgitity compared to another?
post #2 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post
Is it just folds of the shirts own fabric, or is it one piece of canvas sewn in?

Neither, it's cotton interfacing.
post #3 of 12
in the case of charvet and T & A the collars and cuffs are un fused. (no glue)
post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
But what is it made out of and where could I get some?
post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post
But what is it made out of and where could I get some?

As Sanguis Mortuum stated: in-between the fabric is a piece of cotton interfacing. I have no idea where you could procure some cotton interfacing material.
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post
But what is it made out of and where could I get some?

You can get it anywhere you would normally get tailoring/shirtmaking supplies, e.g B. Black & Sons (though they only seem to have heavy-weight for some reason).
post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 
For some reason whenever I look for the stuff in nyc I can only find one weight and one type of material. I guess quality of canvas interfacing isn't really and issue, it is more of fusable vs non-fusable?
post #8 of 12
Shirts of these quality are not fused, it is usualy the same material as the shirt no glue or anything like that.
post #9 of 12
Is cotton interfacing really required? Can you not use leftover fabrics of the same kind. I'm sure there are remainders that would have otherwise gone to waste after the pattern has been cut.
post #10 of 12
It depends on the kind of collar and the fabric. For one thing, you wouldn't use striped fabric as interfacing for obvious reasons. Another concern is that you don't want it to shrink more than the shirt fabric does.

Then there's the style of the collar. A buttondown should be soft, could be self-interfaced, no interfacing, whatever. On the other hand a spread needs to be stiffer--you can't do that if you interface with 3-oz broadcloth. IIRC most collars with stays actually use two layers of interfacing to keep them from showing through.

If you're going for a soft collar, you could use self-fabric, muslin, whatever. Just shrink it beforehand.

I think the difference between good interfacing and cheap stuff is the thickness and stiffness (i.e., good interfacing would be stiffer without being thicker), but what do I know?
post #11 of 12
I got a similar thread here. But I still think most shirts have plastic interlining ( Finamore ? ) as they sound as it.

http://www.styleforum.net/showthread.php?t=179391
post #12 of 12

I think i know what you are looking for "The  real cotton interfacing for shirt collar and cuff",If you feel  i could be of help please feel free to contact met through my email address  ufomaduclothiers@gmail.com or call 334-349-0986.

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