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Will I be ok lifting four days a week? - Page 2

post #16 of 55
I wouldn't reccomend training more than two days in a row. Anyway here are some signs of OTing:


If you experience any of these warning signs, immediately cut back on your training frequency.
Deep-rooted fatique from which you can't seem to recover
Digestion problems
A resting heart rate that is lower than normal
Lower blood pressure

If you experience any of these symptoms, cut back on your training intensity within your workouts.
Troubled sleep
Profuse sweating
A resting heart rate that is higher than normal
A heart rate that stays elevated longer after exercise than normal
Emotional instability
post #17 of 55
Yes, you can lift four days a week. I have lift 5 times in a week when i was younger (out of stupidity, copying professional bodybuilding programs). It's all a matter of volume and intensity and getting enough sleep and food. And not doing excessive amounts of cardio. And yes, you shouldn't train more than two days in a row. While your muscles may recover, your neural system probably won't. But I really wouldn't recommend for that kind of training. Mostly newbies and beginners get far better results by lifting 3 times a week and training the whole body every time or with upper body/lower body split. Or you can just begin training only 2 times a week, training whole body each time. IMHO, total newbie starting that your kind of "bodybuilding" program...it's just stupid, if you don't use AAS. Your trainer should know that. Learn basic compound movements, avoid machines as much as you can. Read information from the dedicated sites to bodybuilding and strength training. With all due respect, this isn't probably the best place to get information for your strength training questions. And have fun pumping.
post #18 of 55
Is it possible for you to take 1 day of rest in the middle of your 4 days? I personally lift on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. I've never had a problem with over-training by doing this.
post #19 of 55
Ducati makes a good point on splitting it up - 4 in a row when you have never lifted is too much.

Couple things..
A. For the first month or two the area you worked two days ago will be killing you. This is normal and just shows that you broke down the muscle and it is repairing. A good soak and a massage will help and glutamine right after workign out will help.

B. If a body part has ANY soreness left in it or feels weak do not work it that day - counterproductive. If it is still sore the muscle is still repairing from last time.

Best of luck, I just went back on my program after gaining a bunch of weight in the last year... I envy you hard gainer types! I can gain muscle with ease but I look at a cheeseburger and my ass expands 2 inches.

Decided it was time for the diet when a couple little liberal kids at the beach tossed water on me and tried to roll me back into the ocean... sigh
post #20 of 55
You should not be training four days in a row. Weeks are just vestigial units of time measurement, and they have no actual bearing on your body's ability to repair muscle. Four days a week is a bit much, honestly. You'll need more frequent training when you start because repair times are shorter (the same degree of exercise later on can be done once or twice a week), but four days is still on the high side. Muscle is built when you're lying in your bed in pain, not when you're lifting anything. Personally, I'd recommend three days a week alternating with one day of complete rest at the end. If you really want to do four days, you can; I'm not sure you'll get anything more out of it. Dusty, out of curiosity, what changed your mind on training?
post #21 of 55
makes sure you are not over training. Consume sufficient amount of high quality protein and mineral, very important.
post #22 of 55
Thread Starter 
Here's what I still don't get: If I'm targeting specific muscles each day of the week, how is it those muscles aren't getting a week of rest? I'm sure there's some degree of muscle cooperation involved for any exercise, but so far I'm only feeling pain in what I've worked specifically. For example, after I did triceps, my triceps hurt terribly, but every other muscle in my arm was fine.

Also, can I run every day?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arethusa
Dusty, out of curiosity, what changed your mind on training?

Just trying to keep in shape, plus I'm bored.
post #23 of 55
Do you really enjoy the gym THAT much? Do you have that much spare time on your hands? maybe it's the novelty of the idea. While I'm sure there are ways that it can be done without long-term consequence. I ask why spend all that time?

As a beginner any exercise will show gains regardless of technique or frequency.

For more efficient training, go 1 - 2 1/2 times a week and work on complex lifts. Squats, deadlifts, benchpress, pullups, dips, incline shrugs, for example. Prefer free-weights if you can do so safely...in fact, with proper technique, FW's can be safer because they allow natural movement of the body. Some combination of these will provide a more balanced workout that requires less time in the gym than muscle-specific lifts like leg extensions and curls.

Throw in a few laps in the pool.

Cheers,
D

edited to remove flamey comment.
post #24 of 55
I would not recommend targeting specific muscle groups. Aside from this leaving you functionally quite weak, this sort of specific training is also more time consuming. Focusing broadly (eg upper body) is not necessarily a bad idea, but, especially for a beginner, you shouldn't be working single muscles. Hell, even later on, you should work muscle groups and not single muscles. To answer your question specifically, yes, you can work out more frequently if you only do a single muscle each day. But you could also do everything you'd do in a week in a single day, and healing is in many ways a systemic thing. Breaking it up like that is vastly less efficient. Yes you can run every day, though, again, rest is advisable. Leave at least one day a week for complete rest (on that day, all you should do is stretch).
post #25 of 55
Quote:
You should not be training four days in a row. Weeks are just vestigial units of time measurement, and they have no actual bearing on your body's ability to repair muscle.

Four days a week is a bit much, honestly. You'll need more frequent training when you start because repair times are shorter (the same degree of exercise later on can be done once or twice a week), but four days is still on the high side. Muscle is built when you're lying in your bed in pain, not when you're lifting anything.

hmm, it is funny to see how many people weighed in saying that four days a week is too much. As someone who is of average muscular build (6' , 185 lbs.), and who constantly reads about training/health and works out excessively I can tell you that people who are in very good health often train 5-6 days a week. This is not to say that with only 4 days a week you are not going to get great results.

If you want an excellent guide, in my opinion as well as that of a couple of my buddies who are bodybuilders, Arnold Schwarzenegger's book entitled "Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding" is the most thorough guide to understanding the workout and how to get maximum results for each body type. In general, you should be doing aerobic/cardio exercises 4-5 times a week for roughly 35-45 minutes, this includes brisk walks, bicycling, etc. If you want to see results lifting weights, you should be working out at least 4 times a week alternating muscles worked and generally doing ab workouts every time. My brother is a fitness consultant with the Marines and has been whipping my butt into shape my whole life! This book has helped me immensely. Also, don't feel afraid to approach someone at the gym whose physique you admire to ask them their training regimen, it is a good way to find a great workout partner!
post #26 of 55
Oh yeah.

Remember that there are no "quick fixes." Stay away from the steroids.

-Correct execution and form are required on every rep of every lift to stay safe. goes for machine or free weights
-If you cannot lift with correct form due to muscle fatigue or lack of concentration, STOP the lift.
-Don't lift to complete failure without a knowleldgable and attentive spotter and safety equipment.
-Weight/reps should be added in very small incremets. 1-2 lb max each session for a given lift. Which means to increase bench press (or any other lift) by 50 lbs requires a year. This pace will help you maintain correct form. I purchaced 1lb wrist/ankle weights to add to my barbell/etc because my gym doesn't have anything smaller than 2.5lb plates.
-Maintain a workout log to track progress.
-Warm up and cool down.

Cheers,
D
post #27 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Englandmj7
hmm, it is funny to see how many people weighed in saying that four days a week is too much. As someone who is of average muscular build (6' , 185 lbs.), and who constantly reads about training/health and works out excessively I can tell you that people who are in very good health train 5-6 days a week. This is not to say that with only 4 days a week you are not going to get great results.
Lifting six days a week is a great way to permanently injure yourself and never see any gain.
post #28 of 55
Quote:
Lifting six days a week is a great way to permanently injure yourself and never see any gain.

You clearly don't work out correctly if you think this is the case. As long you are not lifting incorrectly/excessively, and alternation between muscles worked is followed whilst maintaining an appropriate diet/water intake you could work out 7 days a week (although you should not). I don't know where you get your info. from but if you know anyone who is extremely athletic and/or a bodybuilder they would laugh at this claim. If you are referring to working EVERY muscle in your body EVERYDAY then yes, that would be extremely unintelligent and you would absolutely hurt yourself. Of course your muscles need time to relax. That is why you ALTERNATE.

I work out 6 days a week and see at least 50 other people in my gym on a daily basis who do the same. I have no intention of turning this into an argument, but you are clearly assuming that I am referring to working out for 6 hours a day 6 days a week, which is not the case.

Quote:
I would not recommend targeting specific muscle groups. Aside from this leaving you functionally quite weak, this sort of specific training is also more time consuming. Focusing broadly (eg upper body) is not necessarily a bad idea, but, especially for a beginner, you shouldn't be working single muscles. Hell, even later on, you should work muscle groups and not single muscles.

This is absolutely absurd; You "would not recommend targeting specific muscle groups!" You might as well tell the guy to sit on his arse whilst drinking a beer to get in shape!
post #29 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Englandmj7
hmm, it is funny to see how many people weighed in saying that four days a week is too much. As someone who is of average muscular build (6' , 185 lbs.), and who constantly reads about training/health and works out excessively I can tell you that people who are in very good health train 5-6 days a week. This is not to say that with only 4 days a week you are not going to get great results.

If you want an excellent guide, in my opinion as well as that of a couple of my buddies who are bodybuilders, Arnold Schwarzenegger's book entitled "Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding" is the most thorough guide to understanding the workout and how to get maximum results for each body type. In general, you should be doing aerobic/cardio exercises 4-5 times a week for roughly 35-45 minutes, this includes brisk walks, bicycling, etc. If you want to see results lifting weights, you should be working out at least 4 times a week alternating muscles worked and generally doing ab workouts every time. My brother is a fitness consultant with the Marines and has been whipping my butt into shape my whole life! This book has helped me immensely. Also, don't feel afraid to approach someone at the gym whose physique you admire to ask them their training regimen, it is a good way to find a great workout partner!

All due respect, what works for Schwarzenegger is not going to work for everyone. I've been through this with trainers and seen it in action in my own workouts. I have to fight dearly to gain any weight at all, and if I lift four times a week, I will not see any gains. It's only when I drop down to two, sometimes three days a week of lifting that I start to see any progression at all. Even then it's slow, but at least it's something.

So, I'm calling bullshit. What works for some people won't work for all people. There are plenty of health and bodybuilding resources that will tell you exactly what I've said--that for some people, four days of lifting a week will be overtraining (particularly if you're doing mostly compound exercises, like you should). If dusty is one of those for whom four+ days a week of lifting works, then great. If not, your advice could limit his gains. I had mine limited for a long time due to the very mindset you seem to have.
post #30 of 55
^^ I understand your quip and I did not say that everyone should work out more than 4 days I week, I was simply pointing out that is is ABSOLUTELY not "bad" to work out 4 days a week, which was the poster's question, was it not? And with all due respect, the book is not "what works for Arnold" it is possibly the most definitive work to date as it was done under guidance from several doctors as well as a vast multitude of other bodybuilders. It is not simply what works for them, it shows EVERY exercise under the sun and explains how it works each muscle for each body type; the damn thing weighs 15 lbs.! It leaves no stone unturned.

Quote:
If dusty is one of those for whom four+ days a week of lifting works, then great. If not, your advice could limit his gains. I had mine limited for a long time due to the very mindset you seem to have.

Is this statement not being a bit hypocritical? Again, whilst you may think I am assuming what works for me or Arnold is what will work for the person who posted the thread, you are doing the same thing by saying that less than 4 days works for you so it should work for him. You are right, each body is different, so your advice to him is no better than mine.

It seems I am being made to seem as some sort of workout Nazi, I was simply saying that if you learn to work out correctly (which I suggest you save some money doing by buying the book instead of getting a trainer) you can work out for more than 4 days a week. I did not say you have to, I did not say you need to. All I am saying is that it depends on you and how intensely you work out.



Therefore, I would again mention that you should buy the book.
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